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Commands using du from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using du - 204 results
du -sh * | grep -v '\.\/\.'
du --max-depth=1 | grep -v '\.\/\.'
du -cks * | sort -rn | while read size fname; do for unit in k M G T P E Z Y; do if [ $size -lt 1024 ]; then echo -e "${size}${unit}\t${fname}"; break; fi; size=$((size/1024)); done; done
find . -name 'pattern'| xargs du -hc
tar pcf - home | pv -s $(du -sb home | awk '{print $1}') --rate-limit 500k | gzip > /mnt/c/home.tar.gz
2010-04-02 15:29:03
User: Sail
Functions: awk du gzip tar
1

tar directory and compress it with showing progress and Disk IO limits. Pipe Viewer can be used to view the progress of the task, Besides, he can limit the disk IO, especially useful for running Servers.

du -kd | egrep -v "/.*/" | sort -n
2010-03-30 15:40:35
User: rmbjr60
Functions: du egrep sort
-1

Thanks for the submit! My alternative produces summaries only for directories. The original post additionally lists all files in the current directory. Sometimes the files, they just clutter up the output. Once the big directory is located, *then* worry about which file(s) are consuming so much space.

du -hs *|grep M|sort -n
2010-03-25 19:20:24
User: tuxlifan
Functions: du grep sort
3

This is easy to type if you are looking for a few (hundred) "missing" megabytes (and don't mind the occasional K slipping in)...

A variation without false positives and also finding gigabytes (but - depending on your keyboard setup - more painful to type):

du -hs *|grep -P '^(\d|,)+(M|G)'|sort -n

(NOTE: you might want to replace the ',' according to your locale!)

Don't forget that you can

modify the globbing as needed! (e.g. '.[^\.]* *' to include hidden files and directories (w/ bash))

in its core similar to:

http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/706/show-sorted-list-of-files-with-sizes-more-than-1mb-in-the-current-dir

( du -xSk || du -kod ) | sort -nr | head
2010-03-16 04:05:14
Functions: du sort
4

No need to type out the full OR clause if you know which OS you're on, but this is easy cut-n-paste or alias to get top ten directories by singleton.

To avoid the error output from du -xSk you could always 2>/dev/null but you might miss relevant STDERR.

du -sh some/directory
2010-02-21 02:08:28
User: Jacolyte
Functions: du
-5

Displays only the subtotal size of a directory with the -s option, and in human readable format.

du -x --max-depth=1 | sort -n | awk '{ print $2 }' | xargs du -hx --max-depth=0
2010-02-18 19:46:47
User: d34dh0r53
Functions: awk du sort xargs
4

Provides numerically sorted human readable du output. I so wish there was just a du flag for this.

du -sk ./* | sort -nr
2010-02-04 04:08:05
User: op4
Functions: du sort
4

full command below, would not let me put full command in text box

du -sk ./* | sort -nr | awk 'BEGIN{ pref[1]="K"; pref[2]="M"; pref[3]="G";} { total = total + $1; x = $1; y = 1; while( x > 1024 ) { x = (x + 1023)/1024; y++; } printf("%g%s\t%s\n",int(x*10)/10,pref[y],$2); } END { y = 1; while( total > 1024 ) { total = (total + 1023)/1024; y++; } printf("Total: %g%s\n",int(total*10)/10,pref[y]); }'

find . -type f -size +1100000k |xargs -I% du -sh %
2010-01-31 22:04:07
User: 4fthawaiian
Functions: du find xargs
1

simple find -> xargs sort of thing that I get a lot of use out of. Helps find huge files and gives an example of how to use xargs to deal with them. Tested on OSX snow leopard (10.6). Enjoy.

du -s * | sort -nr | head | cut -f2 | parallel -k du -sh
2010-01-28 12:59:14
Functions: cut du head sort
Tags: du xargs parallel
-2

If a directory name contains space xargs will do the wrong thing. Parallel https://savannah.nongnu.org/projects/parallel/ deals better with that.

dir='path to file'; tar cpf - "$dir" | pv -s $(du -sb "$dir" | awk '{print $1}') | tar xpf - -C /other/path
2010-01-19 19:05:45
User: starchox
Functions: awk dir du tar
Tags: copy tar cp
-2

This may seem like a long command, but it is great for making sure all file permissions are kept in tact. What it is doing is streaming the files in a sub-shell and then untarring them in the target directory. Please note that the -z command should not be used for local files and no perfomance increase will be visible as overhead processing (CPU) will be evident, and will slow down the copy.

You also may keep simple with, but you don't have the progress info:

cp -rpf /some/directory /other/path
file='path to file'; tar -cf - "$file" | pv -s $(du -sb "$file" | awk '{print $1}') | gzip -c | ssh -c blowfish user@host tar -zxf - -C /opt/games
2010-01-19 16:02:45
User: starchox
Functions: awk du file gzip ssh tar
3

You set the file/dirname transfer variable, in the end point you set the path destination, this command uses pipe view to show progress, compress the file outut and takes account to change the ssh cipher. Support dirnames with spaces.

Merged ideas and comments by http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/4379/copy-working-directory-and-compress-it-on-the-fly-while-showing-progress and http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/3177/move-a-lot-of-files-over-ssh

find dir -size -1024k -type f -print0 | du --files0-from - -bc
2009-12-29 01:33:55
User: bhepple
Functions: dir du find
Tags: size sum
2

The original didn't use -print0 which fails on weird file names eg with spaces.

The original parsed the output of 'ls -l' which is always a bad idea.

find /home/bubo/ -type f \( -iname \*.jpg -print0 , -iname \*.png -print0 , -iname \*gif -print0 \) | du -cm --files0-from - | tail -1
tar -cf - . | pv -s $(du -sb . | awk '{print $1}') | gzip > out.tgz
2009-12-18 17:09:08
User: opertinicy
Functions: awk du gzip tar
25

What happens here is we tell tar to create "-c" an archive of all files in current dir "." (recursively) and output the data to stdout "-f -". Next we specify the size "-s" to pv of all files in current dir. The "du -sb . | awk ?{print $1}?" returns number of bytes in current dir, and it gets fed as "-s" parameter to pv. Next we gzip the whole content and output the result to out.tgz file. This way "pv" knows how much data is still left to be processed and shows us that it will take yet another 4 mins 49 secs to finish.

Credit: Peteris Krumins http://www.catonmat.net/blog/unix-utilities-pipe-viewer/

find . -maxdepth 1 -type d -not -name . -exec du -sh {} +
2009-12-11 14:37:26
User: sorpigal
Functions: du find
-6

Parsing the output of ls is never a good idea for any reason. Using find this way:

- works with files that have spaces in their names.

- actually lists "sub folders" and not of all files and folders.

- does not break if there are a huge number of files in the current directory.

ls | xargs du -sh
du -ms * 2>/dev/null |sort -nr|head
du | sort -nr | cut -f2- | xargs du -hs
dh() { du -ch --max-depth=1 "${@-.}"|sort -h }