Hide

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again.

Delete that bloated snippets file you've been using and share your personal repository with the world. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.


If you have a new feature suggestion or find a bug, please get in touch via http://commandlinefu.uservoice.com/

Get involved!

You can sign-in using OpenID credentials, or register a traditional username and password.

First-time OpenID users will be automatically assigned a username which can be changed after signing in.

Hide

Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for:

Hide

News

2011-03-12 - Confoo 2011 presentation
Slides are available from the commandlinefu presentation at Confoo 2011: http://presentations.codeinthehole.com/confoo2011/
2011-01-04 - Moderation now required for new commands
To try and put and end to the spamming, new commands require moderation before they will appear on the site.
2010-12-27 - Apologies for not banning the trolls sooner
Have been away from the interwebs over Christmas. Will be more vigilant henceforth.
2010-09-24 - OAuth and pagination problems fixed
Apologies for the delay in getting Twitter's OAuth supported. Annoying pagination gremlin also fixed.
Hide

Tags

Hide

Functions

Commands using echo from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using echo - 1,269 results
newest () { DIR=${1:-'.'}; CANDIDATE=`find $DIR -type f|head -n1`; while [[ ! -z $CANDIDATE ]]; do BEST=$CANDIDATE; CANDIDATE=`find $DIR -newer "$BEST" -type f|head -n1`; done; echo "$BEST"; }
2010-02-04 12:40:44
User: shadycraig
Functions: echo head
1

Works recusivley in the specified dir or '.' if none given.

Repeatedly calls 'find' to find a newer file, when no newer files exist you have the newest.

In this case 'newest' means most recently modified. To find the most recently created change -newer to -cnewer.

echo '.dump' | sqlite3 your_sqlite.db > your_sqlite_text.txt
2010-02-04 07:58:41
User: alamati
Functions: echo
4

If you want edit your sqlite database in any uft8 supported editor, you can dump whole sqlite database to plain text.

echo {1..199}" bottles of beer on the wall, cold bottle of beer, take one down, pass it around, one less bottle of beer on the wall,, " | espeak -v english -s 140
2010-02-04 04:38:52
User: op4
Functions: echo
20

you know the song... sing along

echo "DISPLAY=$DISPLAY xmessage setup suphp perms htscanner acct#101101 host2.domain.com" | at 23:00 Feb 8
2010-02-04 04:26:24
User: op4
Functions: at echo
1

setup for reminder in 5 days, added the date in the future. To run a job at 4pm three days from now, you would do at 4pm + 3 days, to run a job at 10:00am on July 31, you would do at 10am Jul 31 and to run a job at 1am tomorrow, you would do at 1am tomorrow.

echo "DISPLAY=$DISPLAY xmessage convert db to innodb" | at 00:00
while read l; do echo $RANDOM "$l"; done | sort -n | cut -d " " -f 2-
2010-02-03 22:36:34
User: ketil
Functions: cut echo read sort
0

If you need to randomize the lines in a file, but have an old sort commands that doesn't support the -R option, this could be helpful. It's easy enough to remember so that you can create it as a script and use that.

It ain't real fast. It ain't safe. It ain't super random. Do not use it on untrusted data. It requires bash for the $RANDOM variable to work.

echo 'c84fa6b830e38ee8a551df61172d53d7 myfile' | md5sum -c
ruler() { for s in '....^....|' '1234567890'; do w=${#s}; str=''; for (( i=1; i<=(COLUMNS + w) / $w; i=i+1 )); do str+=$s; done; str=${str:0:COLUMNS} ; echo $str; done; }
2010-01-31 05:55:00
User: dennisw
Functions: echo
1

A similar version for Bash that doesn't require cut and shortens the function in a few places. And it uses local variables. (similar to a version by eightmillion in a comment on the another version)

echo alias xkcd="gwenview `w3m -dump http://xkcd.com/|grep png | awk '{print $5}'` 2> /dev/null" >> .bashrc
2010-01-30 20:38:16
User: GinoMan2440
Functions: alias echo
-5

Add an alias to your .bashrc that allows you to issue the command xkcd to view (with gwenview) the newest xkcd comic... I know there are thousands of them out there but this one is at least replete with installer and also uses a more concise syntax... plus, gwenview shows you the downloading progress as it downloads the comic and gives you a more full featured viewing experience.

[ "c84fa6b830e38ee8a551df61172d53d7" = "$(md5sum myfile | cut -d' ' -f1)" ] && echo OK || echo FAIL
md5 myfile | awk '{print $4}' | diff <(echo "c84fa6b830e38ee8a551df61172d53d7") -
2010-01-29 16:57:13
User: voidpointer
Functions: awk diff echo
2

Makes sure the contents of "myfile" are the same contents that the author intended given the author's md5 hash of that file ("c84fa6b830e38ee8a551df61172d53d7").

echo $(echo $(seq $MIN $MAX) | sed 's/ /+/g') | bc -l
ruler() { for s in '....^....|' '1234567890'; do w=${#s}; str=$( for (( i=1; $i<=$(( ($COLUMNS + $w) / $w )) ; i=$i+1 )); do echo -n $s; done ); str=$(echo $str | cut -c -$COLUMNS) ; echo $str; done; }
a="www.commandlinefu.com";b="/index.php";for n in $(seq 1 7);do echo -en "GET $b HTTP/1.0\r\nHost: "$a"\r\n\r\n" |nc $a 80 2>&1 |grep Set-Cookie;done
2010-01-28 14:19:43
User: vlan7
Functions: echo grep seq
Tags: bash cookies
3

The loop is to compare cookies. You can remove it...

Maybe you wanna use curl...

curl www.commandlinefu.com/index.php -s0 -I | grep "Set-Cookie"
echo $(( $( cat count.txt | tr "\n" "+" | xargs -I{} echo {} 0 ) ))
2010-01-27 10:02:30
User: glaudiston
Functions: cat echo tr xargs
0

if you, like me, do not have the numsum, this way can do the same.

for host in $(cat ftps.txt) ; do if echo -en "o $host 21\nquit\n" |telnet 2>/dev/null |grep -v 'Connected to' >/dev/null; then echo -en "FTP $host KO\n"; fi done
2010-01-26 15:34:18
User: vlan7
Functions: cat echo grep host telnet
1

I must monitorize a couple of ftp servers every morning WITHOUT a port-scanner

Instead of ftp'ing on 100 ftp servers manually to test their status I use this loop.

It might be adaptable to other services, however it may require a 'logout' string instead of 'quit'.

The file ftps.txt contains the full list of ftp servers to monitorize.

savesIFS=$IFS;IFS=$(echo -en "\n\b"); for items in `ls *.7z`; do 7zr e $items ; done; IFS=$saveIFS
nmap -sP <subnet>.* | egrep -o '[0-9]+\.[0-9]+\.[0-9]+\.[0-9]+' > results.txt ; for IP in {1..254} ; do echo "<subnet>.${IP}" ; done >> results.txt ; cat results.txt | sort -n -t . -k 1,1 -k 2,2 -k 3,3 -k 4,4 | uniq -u
for i in $(ps -ef | awk '{print $2}') ; { swp=$( awk '/Swap/{sum+=$2} END {print sum}' /proc/$i/smaps ); if [[ -n $swp && 0 != $swp ]] ; then echo -n "\n $swp $i "; cat /proc/$i/cmdline ; fi; } | sort -nr
(IFS=; sed 's/^[]0;[^^G]*^G/^M/g' <SessionLog> | while read -n 1 ITEM; do [ "$ITEM" = "^M" ] && ITEM=$'\n'; echo -ne "$ITEM"; sleep 0.05; done; echo)
2010-01-20 16:11:32
User: jgc
Functions: echo read sed sleep
Tags: read script
0

This command will play back each keystroke in a session log recorded using the script command. You'll need to replace the ^[ ^G and ^M characters with CTRL-[, CTRL-G and CTRL-M. To do this you need to press CTRL-V CTRL-[ or CTRL-V CTRL-G or CTRL-V CTRL-M.

You can adjust the playback typing speed by modifying the sleep.

If you're not bothered about seeing each keypress then you could just use:

cat session.log
echo $VARIABLE | xargs -d'\40' -n 6 echo
2010-01-20 15:12:53
User: SuperFly
Functions: echo xargs
1

Print out the contents of $VARIABLE, six words per line, ignoring any single or double quotes in the text. Useful when $VARIABLE contains a sentence that changes periodically, and may or may not contain quoted text.

removedir(){ read -p "Delete the current directory $PWD ? " human;if [ "$human" = "yes" ]; then [ -z "${PWD##*/}" ] && { echo "$PWD not set" >&2;return 1;}; rm -Rf ../"${PWD##*/}"/ && cd ..; else echo "I'm watching you" | pv -qL 10; fi; }
for /f "delims==" %a in (' dir "%USERPROFILE%\*.sqlite" /s/b ') do echo vacuum;|"sqlite3.exe" "%a"
2010-01-18 20:56:00
User: vutcovici
Functions: dir echo
-3

This command defragment the SQLite databases found in the home folder of the current Windows user.

This is usefull to speed up Firefox startup.

The executable sqlite3.exe must be located in PATH or in the current folder.

In a script use:

for /f "delims==" %%a in (' dir "%USERPROFILE%\*.sqlite" /s/b ') do echo vacuum;|"sqlite3.exe" "%%a"
removedir () { echo "Deleting the current directory $PWD Are you sure?"; read human; if [[ "$human" = "yes" ]]; then blah=$(echo "$PWD" | sed 's/ /\\ /g'); foo=$(basename "$blah"); rm -Rf ../$foo/ && cd ..; else echo "I'm watching you" | pv -qL 10; fi; }
2010-01-17 11:34:38
User: oshazard
Functions: basename cd echo read rm sed
-3

CHANGELOG

Version 1.1

removedir () { echo "You are about to delete the current directory $PWD Are you sure?"; read human; if [[ "$human" = "yes" ]]; then blah=$(echo "$PWD" | sed 's/ /\\ /g'); foo=$(basename "$blah"); rm -Rf ../$foo/ && cd ..; else echo "I'm watching you" | pv -qL 10; fi; }

BUG FIX:

Folders with spaces

Version 1.0

removedir () { echo "You are about to delete the current directory $PWD Are you sure?"; read human; if [[ "$human" = "yes" ]]; then blah=`basename $PWD`; rm -Rf ../$blah/ && cd ..; else echo "I'm watching you" | pv -qL 10; fi; }

BUG FIX:

Hidden directories (.dotdirectory)

Version 0.9

rmdir () { echo "You are about to delete the current directory $PWD. Are you sure?"; read human; if [[ "$human" = "yes" ]]; then blah=`basename $PWD`; rm -Rf ../$blah/ && cd ..; else echo "I'm watching you" | pv -qL 10; fi; }

Removes current directory with recursive and force flags plus basic human check. When prompted type yes

1. [user@host ~]$ ls

foo bar

2. [user@host ~]$ cd foo

3. [user@host foo]$ removedir

4. yes

5. rm -Rf foo/

6. [user@host ~]$

7. [user@host ~]$ ls

bar

echo -e "swap=me\n1=2"|sed 's/\(.*\)=\(.*\)/\2=\1/g'