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May 19, 2015 - A Look At The New Commandlinefu
I've put together a short writeup on what kind of newness you can expect from the next iteration of clfu. Check it out here.
March 2, 2015 - New Management
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Commands using echo from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using echo - 1,303 results
echo "some cool message from terminal" | mail -s "test" email@address.com
echo "Dave" | grep -o "bob" | sed 's/D/f/'; echo ${PIPESTATUS[1]};
2014-06-21 04:00:53
User: davethomas11
Functions: echo grep sed

Using the $PIPESTATUS array you can get the results of a command in a sequence of commands piped together. The command above returns the result of grep -o "bob", which is exit result of 1 since no match was made.

message="I have a nice easy typing pace"; for ((i=0; i<${#message}; i++)); do echo "after 200" | tclsh; printf "${message:$i:1}"; done; echo;
echo "I am $BASH_SUBSHELL levels nested";
echo $(ifconfig) | egrep -o "en.*?inet [^ ]* " | sed 's/.*inet \(.*\)$/\1/' | tail -n +2
function google { Q="$@";GOOG_URL='https://www.google.com/search?tbs=li:1&q=';AGENT="Mozilla/4.0";stream=$(curl -A "$AGENT" -skLm 10 "${GOOG_URL}${Q//\ /+}");echo "$stream" | grep -o "href=\"/url[^\&]*&amp;" | sed 's/href=".url.q=\([^\&]*\).*/\1/';}
find -type f -exec bash -c 'if ffmpeg -i "{}" 2>&1 | grep -qi h264 ; then echo "{}"; fi' \;
F=136; [[ $(($F % 4)) == 0 ]] && for i in $(seq 1 $(($F/4))); do echo -n $(($F-2*($i-1))),$((2*$i-1)),$((2*$i)),$(($F-2*$i+1)),; done | sed 's/,$/\n/' || echo "Make F a multiple of 4."
2014-06-11 01:21:08
User: Kayvlim
Functions: echo sed seq

Useful if you don't have at hand the ability to automatically create a booklet, but still want to.

F is the number of pages to print. It *must* be a multiple of 4; append extra blank pages if needed.

In evince, these are the steps to print it, adapted from https://help.gnome.org/users/evince/stable/duplex-npage.html.en :

1) Click File ▸ Print.

2) Choose the General tab.

Under Range, choose Pages.

Type the numbers of the pages in this order (this is what this one-liner does for you):

n, 1, 2, n-1, n-2, 3, 4, n-3, n-4, 5, 6, n-5, n-6, 7, 8, n-7, n-8, 9, 10, n-9, n-10, 11, 12, n-11...

...until you have typed n-number of pages.

3) Choose the Page Setup tab.

- Assuming a duplex printer:

Under Layout, in the Two-side menu, select Short Edge (Flip).

- If you can only print on one side, you have to print twice, one for the odd pages and one for the even pages.

In the Pages per side option, select 2.

In the Page ordering menu, select Left to right.

4) Click Print.

NUM=-1; while NUM=`echo $NUM + 1 | bc`; do echo $NUM && sleep 1; done
2014-06-07 20:48:45
User: tomivs
Functions: echo sleep

Chronometer using the bc calculator.

col() { awk '{print $('$(echo $* | sed -e s/-/NF-/g -e 's/ /),$(/g')')}'; }
2014-06-05 18:01:31
User: tekniq
Functions: awk col echo sed

Something I do a lot is extract columns from some input where cut is not suitable because the columns are separated by not a single character but multiple spaces or tabs. So I often do things like:

... | awk '{print $7, $8}'

... which is a lot of typing, additionally slowed down when typing symbols like '{}$ ... Using the simple one-line function above makes it easier and faster:

... | col 7 8

How it works:

The one-liner defines a new function with name col

The function will execute awk, and it expects standard input (coming from a pipe or input redirection)

The function arguments are processed with sed to use them with awk: replace all spaces with ,$ so that for example 1 2 3 becomes 1,$2,$3, which is inserted into the awk command to become the well formatted shell command: awk '{print $1,$2,$3}'

Allows negative indexes to extract columns relative to the end of the line.

Credit: http://www.bashoneliners.com/oneliners/oneliner/144/

while true; do clear; cat /proc/[0-9]*/stat | cut -d' ' -f 3 | sort | uniq -c | awk '{print $2" "$1}'; echo '---'; sleep 1; done
echo 'flush_all' | nc localhost 11211
echo thisIsATest | sed -E 's/([A-Z])/_\L\1/g'
for i in $(cat vulns.txt); do echo $i; rpm -qa ?changelog | grep -i $i; done
2014-04-30 16:11:14
User: sonny108
Functions: cat echo grep rpm

Found it online and could be very useful

csvcount() { for dir in $@; do echo -e "$(find $dir -name '*.csv' | wc -l)\t$dir"; done }
echo 16384 > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/neigh/default/gc_thresh1; echo 32768 > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/neigh/default/gc_thresh2; echo 65535 > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/neigh/default/gc_thresh3; echo 1 > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/icmp_ignore_bogus_error_responses
2014-04-25 00:18:58
User: andregyn62
Functions: echo

This command solve the problem ping: sendmsg: No buffer space available to.

for i in `grep -ri "?\|?\|?\|?\|?" * --col | cut -d: -f1 |sort -u `;do sed -i "s/?/\&aacute;/g" $i; sed -i "s/?/\&eacute;/g" $i; sed -i "s/?/\&iacute;/g" $i; sed -i "s/?/\&oacute;/g" $i; sed -i "s/?/\&uacute;/g" $i; echo "HTMLizing file [$i]";done
2014-04-24 11:43:36
User: linuxninja
Functions: cut echo sed sort

If we've many files containing (?, ?, ?, ?, ? ) characters instead of ?, ?,... etc,...

we can ue this simple command line running a sed command inside a for loop searching for files containing that characters.

Hope u like it! Enjoy! ;)

for file in /usr/bin/*; do pacman -Qo "$file" &> /dev/null || echo "$file"; done
2014-04-22 21:57:08
User: malathion
Functions: echo file

In this example I am returning all the files in /usr/bin that weren't put there by pacman, so that they can be moved to /usr/local/bin where they (most likely) belong.

getlunid() { lv=$(df -P $1|grep "^/dev/"|awk '{print $1}'|awk -F/ '{print $3}'); hd=$(lslv -l $lv|tail -1|awk '{print $1}');id=$(odmget -q "name like $hd AND attribute=unique_id" CuAt|grep "value ="|awk -F= '{print $2}'|tr -d '"');echo $id;}
2014-04-20 18:43:21
User: bigstupid
Functions: awk df echo grep tail tr
Tags: aix lvm SAN odm

For a given filesystem return the LUN ID. Command assumes 1:1 relationship between fs:lv:hdisk:lun which may not be the case in all environments.

: $(cal [$month $year]) ; echo $_
echo -n test@example.com | md5sum | (read hash dash ; echo "https://secure.gravatar.com/avatar/${hash}")
cat dictionary.txt|while read a; do echo $a|cryptsetup luksOpen /dev/sda5 sda5 $a && echo KEY FOUND: $a; done
2014-04-16 18:49:53
User: rodolfoap
Functions: cat echo read

Lost your luks passphrase? You can always bruteforce from the command line. See the sample output, a simple command using a dictionary.

for a in {p,P}{a,A,4}{s,S,5}{s,S,5}; do echo $a|cryptsetup luksOpen /dev/sda5 $a && echo KEY FOUND: $a; done
2014-04-16 18:41:50
User: rodolfoap
Functions: echo

Lost your luks passphrase? You can always bruteforce from the command line. See the sample output, a simple command for the "pass" word, using combinations of upper/lowercase or number replacement. The generated combinations are:

for a in {p,P}{a,A,4}{s,S,5}{s,S,5}; do echo $a; done








for id in `ls -1 ~/.ssh | grep -v "authorized\|known_hosts\|config\|\."` ; do echo -n "$id: " ; ssh-keygen -l -f .ssh/$id ; done
2014-04-16 14:12:20
User: drockney
Functions: echo grep id ssh-keygen

Find all private keys and dump their fingerprints.

for file in $(find . -name *.mp4); do ogv=${file%%.mp4}.ogv; if test "$file" -nt "$ogv"; then echo $file' is newer then '$ogv; ffmpeg2theora $file; fi done