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Commands using echo from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using echo - 1,291 results
echo $PATH|tr : '\n'|sort|uniq -d
host A: cat /proc/dev/ttyS0 host B: echo hello > /dev/ttyS0
2009-09-24 13:22:23
User: flart
Functions: cat echo host
2

If the connection works you should see a "hello" on host A. If not: check your cabeling etc :-)

mplayer -vo dummy -ao dummy -identify * 2>&1 | grep ID_LENGTH | sed 's/.*=\([0-9]*\)/\1/' | xargs echo | sed 's/ /+/g' | bc | awk 'S=$1; {printf "%dh:%dm:%ds\n",S/(60*60),S%(60*60)/60,S%60}'
2009-09-24 10:33:19
User: Strawp
Functions: awk bc echo grep sed xargs
5

You're behind on your TV catch-up, but how far behind? This command tries to open mplayer against all files in the current dir. If it's a video file it will contain ID_LENGTH, which is summed and output in hours, minutes and seconds.

Someone better at awk could probably reduce this down a lot.

(echo "set terminal png;plot '-' u 1:2 t 'cpu' w linespoints;"; sudo vmstat 2 10 | awk 'NR > 2 {print NR, $13}') | gnuplot > plot.png
for each in `cut -d " " -f 1 inputfile.txt`; do echo "select * from table where id = \"$each\";"; done
2009-09-23 13:29:16
User: hfs
Functions: echo
Tags: echo cut for-each
0

I never can remember the syntax of awk. You can give a different -d option to cut to separate by e.g. commas. Also this allows to do more things with the generated SQL, e.g. to redirect it into different files.

echo 'Enter Picasa album RSS URL:"; read -e feedurl; GET "$feedurl" |sed 's/</\n</g' | grep media:content |sed 's/.*url='"'"'\([^'"'"']*\)'"'"'.*$/\1/' > wgetlist
2009-09-22 10:51:08
User: kamathln
Functions: echo
0

Grab the RSS link to the Picasa album. Feed it to the script when its hungry. When its done writing the shopping list, just use

wget -c -i wgetlist

to get your stuff.

echo "see attached file" | mail -a filename -s "subject" email@address
2009-09-21 11:58:49
User: gnpf
Functions: echo mail
Tags: mail
1

if "mail -a" fail, try "mutt -a" or "nail -a"

sleeper(){ while `ps -p $1 &>/dev/null`; do echo -n "${2:-.}"; sleep ${3:-1}; done; }; export -f sleeper
13

Very useful in shell scripts because you can run a task nicely in the background using job-control and output progress until it completes.

Here's an example of how I use it in backup scripts to run gpg in the background to encrypt an archive file (which I create in this same way). $! is the process ID of the last run command, which is saved here as the variable PI, then sleeper is called with the process id of the gpg task (PI), and sleeper is also specified to output : instead of the default . every 3 seconds instead of the default 1. So a shorter version would be sleeper $!;

The wait is also used here, though it may not be needed on your system.

echo ">>> ENCRYPTING SQL BACKUP" gpg --output archive.tgz.asc --encrypt archive.tgz 1>/dev/null & PI=$!; sleeper $PI ":" 3; wait $PI && rm archive.tgz &>/dev/null

Previously to get around the $! not always being available, I would instead check for the existance of the process ID by checking if the directory /proc/$PID existed, but not everyone uses proc anymore. That version is currently the one at http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html but I plan on upgrading to this new version soon.

xmms2 mlib search added \> $(echo $(date +%s) - 604800|bc)
echo $(date +%s) > start-time; URL=http://www.google.com; while true; do echo $(curl -L --w %{speed_download} -o/dev/null -s $URL) >> bps; sleep 10; done &
2009-09-19 21:26:06
User: matthewbauer
Functions: date echo sleep
9

This will log your internet download speed.

You can run

gnuplot -persist <(echo "plot 'bps' with lines")

to get a graph of it.

(IFS=:;for p in $PATH; do test -d $p || echo $p; done)
2009-09-19 17:51:06
User: haivu
Functions: echo test
Tags: bash PATH
9

I often need to know of my directory in the PATH, which one DOES NOT exist. This command answers that question

* This command uses only bash's built-in commands

* The parentheses spawn a new sub shell to prevent the modification of the IFS (input field separator) variable in the current shell

echo -ne "\033]0;`id -un`:`id -gn`@`hostname||uname -n|sed 1q` `who -m|sed -e "s%^.* \(pts/[0-9]*\).*(\(.*\))%[\1] (\2)%g"` [`uptime|sed -e "s/.*: \([^,]*\).*/\1/" -e "s/ //g"` / `ps aux|wc -l`]\007"
2009-09-19 06:57:53
User: AskApache
Functions: echo
4

I usually have 5 or more ssh connections to various servers, and putting this command in my .bash_profile file makes my putty window or x terminal window title change to this easily recognizable and descriptive text. Includes the username, group, server hostname, where I am connecting from (for SSH tunneling), which device pts, current server load, and how many processes are running.

You can also use this for your PROMPT_COMMAND variable, which updates the window title to the current values each time you exec a command.

I prefix running this in my .bash_profile with

[[ ! -z "$SSH_TTY" ]] &&

which makes sure it only does this when connecting via SSH with a TTY.

Here's some rougher examples from http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html

# If set, the value is executed as a command prior to issuing each primary prompt. #H=$((hostname || uname -n) 2>/dev/null | sed 1q);W=$(whoami) #export PROMPT_COMMAND='echo -ne "\033]0;${W}@${H}:${PWD/#$HOME/~} ${SSH_TTY/\/dev\//} [`uptime|sed -e "s/.*: \([^,]*\).*/\1/" -e "s/ //g"`]\007"' #PROMPT_COMMAND='echo -ne "\033]0;`id -un`:`id -gn`@`hostname||uname -n 2>/dev/null|sed 1q` `command who -m|sed -e "s%^.* \(pts/[0-9]*\).*(\(.*\))%[\1] (\2)%g"` [`uptime|sed -e "s/.*: \([^,]*\).*/\1/" -e "s/ //g"` / `command ps aux|wc -l`]\007"' #[[ -z "$SSH_TTY" ]] || export PROMPT_COMMAND #[[ -z "$SSH_TTY" ]] && [[ -f /dev/stdout ]] && SSH_TTY=/dev/stdout

And here's a simple function example for setting the title:

function set_window_title(){ echo -e "\033]0; ${1:-$USER@$HOST - $SHLVL} \007"; }
for p in ${PATH//:/ }; do [[ -d $p && -x $p ]] && echo $p; done
2009-09-19 06:43:57
User: AskApache
Functions: echo
1

Finds executable and existing directories in your path that can be useful if migrating a profile script to another system. This is faster and smaller than any other method due to using only bash builtin commands.

See also:

+ http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/743/list-all-execs-in-path-usefull-for-grepping-the-resulting-list

+ http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html

for s in `seq -f %02.0f 5 15`; do echo $s; done
2009-09-18 13:21:38
User: Yeraze
Functions: echo
Tags: bash seq
0

Uses 'seq' with formatting parameter to generate the necessary padded sequence. Change '%02.0f' to how many digits you need (for 3, use %03.0f, etc) and replace 5 & 15 with your desired min and max.

echo "Decode this"| tr [a-zA-Z] $(echo {a..z} {A..Z}|grep -o .|sort -R|tr -d "\n ")
for i in {0..1}{0..9}; do echo $i; done
2009-09-18 02:51:12
User: dennisw
Functions: echo
Tags: bash strings
-1

Bash 4 will let you do {00..19} to get leading zeros, but Bash 3 doesn't have that feature. This technique gets you partway there (the sequences need be such that the last digit ranges from zero to nine - you can't use this for something like Bash 4's {03..27}, for example). When this limitation is not a problem, you can avoid some complicated string manipulation for concatenating leading zeros.

You can add more digits like this: {0..1}{0..9}{0..9} (ranges from 0 to 99 with up to two leading zeros). To pad with additional zeros:

for i in 000{0..1}{0..9}; do echo $i; done

or

for i in {0..1}{0..9}; do echo "000$i"; done

This is useful for creating values to sort or for creating filenames with a fixed format. Note that this will also work:

touch {0..1}{0..9}
echo 127.0.0.1 | egrep -e '^(([01]?[0-9]{1,2}|2[0-4][0-9]|25[0-4])\.){3}([01]?[0-9]{1,2}|2[0-4][0-9]|25[0-4])$'
2009-09-17 17:40:48
User: arcege
Functions: echo egrep
-1

Handles everything except octets with 255. Ran through ip generator with variable octet lengths.

echo 254.003.032.3 | grep -P '^((25[0-4]|2[0-4]\d|[01]?[\d]?[1-9])\.){3}(25[0-4]|2[0-4]\d|[01]?[\d]?[1-9])$'
2009-09-17 12:59:44
User: foob4r
Functions: echo grep
0

This obey that you don't match any broadcast or network addresses and stay between 1.1.1.1 - 254.254.254.254

echo "123.32.12.134" | grep -P '([01]?\d\d?|2[0-4]\d|25[0-5])\.([01]?\d\d?|2[0-4]\d|25[0-5])\.([01]?\d\d?|2[0-4]\d|25[0-5])\.([01]?\d\d?|2[0-4]\d|25[0-5])'
find repMainPath -maxdepth 1 -mindepth 1 -type d | while read dir; do echo processing $dir; sudo svnadmin dump --deltas $dir >dumpPath/`basename $dir`; done
2009-09-15 20:14:51
User: Marco
Functions: dump echo find read sudo
Tags: bash svn
2

This command dumps all SVN repositories inside of folder "repMainPath" (not recursively) to the folder "dumpPath", where one dump file will be created for each SVN repository.

echo a,b,c | sed -e s/,/\',\'/g -e s/^/\(\'/ -e s/$/\'\)/
echo {'1,2,3',4}" o'clock" ROCK
2009-09-15 10:12:49
User: danam
Functions: echo
5

AFAIR this is the wording ;)

find -type f |while read a;do [ "`head -c3 -- "${a}"`" == $'\xef\xbb\xbf' ] && echo "Match: ${a}";done
[ -z "$VAR" ] && echo "VAR has not been set" && exit 1
echo {1..3}" o'clock" ROCK