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Commands using file from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using file - 142 results
find /var/log -type f -exec file {} \; | grep 'text' | cut -d' ' -f1 | sed -e's/:$//g' | grep -v '[0-9]$' | xargs tail -f
2009-06-03 09:47:08
User: mohan43u
Functions: cut file find grep sed tail xargs
Tags: tail
5

Works in Ubuntu, I hope it will work on all Linux machines. For Unixes, tail should be capable of handling more than one file with '-f' option.

This command line simply take log files which are text files, and not ending with a number, and it will continuously monitor those files.

Putting one alias in .profile will be more useful.

season=1; for file in $(ls) ; do dir=$(echo $file | sed 's/.*S0$season\(E[0-9]\{2\}\).*/\1/'); mkdir $dir ; mv $file $dir; done
2009-05-27 03:30:58
User: lonecat
Functions: echo file mkdir mv sed
-1

It happened to me that I got a season of a tv-show which had all files under the same folder like /home/blah/tv_show/season1/file{1,2,3,4,5,...}.avi

But I like to have them like this:

/home/blah/tv_show/season1/e{1,2,3,4,5,...}/file{1,2,3,4,5,...}.avi

So I can have both the srt and the avi on one folder without cluttering much. This command organizes everything assuming that the filename contains Exx where xx is the number of the episode.

You may need to set:

IFS=$'\n'

if your filenames have spaces.

for file in <directory A>/*; do rm <directory B>/`basename $file`; done
2009-05-04 12:44:50
User: jamiebullock
Functions: file rm
Tags: delete rm
10

This command is useful if you accidentally untar or unzip an archive in a directory and you want to automatically remove the files. Just untar the files again in a subdirectory and then run the above command e.g.

for file in ~/Desktop/temp/*; do rm ~/Desktop/`basename $file`; done
for file in $(find -type f -iname "*wav"); do mv $file "$file"_orig.WAV; mplayer -ao pcm "$file"_orig.WAV -ao pcm:file=$file; done
find . \( -type d -name .svn -prune \) -o -print | while read file ; do mergeinfo=`svn propget svn:mergeinfo $file` ; [ "$mergeinfo" != "" ] && echo -e "$file\n $mergeinfo\n" ; done
for file in `find . -type f`; do cat $file; done | wc -l
awk -F "=| "
2009-03-02 21:09:51
User: Bender
Functions: awk cat file
9

You can use multiple field separators by separating them with | (=or).

This may be helpful when you want to split a string by two separators for example.

#echo "one=two three" | awk -F "=| " {'print $1, $3'}

one three

count=`wc -l file | cut -d ' ' -f1`
split -b 19m file Nameforpart
2009-02-25 15:24:06
User: vranx
Functions: file split
10

Split File in 19 MB big parts, putting parts together again via

cat Nameforpartaa Nameforpartab Nameforpartac >> File

smbcacls //server/sharename file -U username
2009-02-16 18:52:14
User: drossman
Functions: file
1

You can read, add, delete and modify Windows permissions from Linux using smbcacls from the smb-client package.

bzr init .;for file in `ls *.bz2`; do bzr import $file; bzr ci -m $file; done
for h in host1 host2 host3 host4 ; { scp file user@$h:/destination_path/ ; }
2009-02-16 01:02:35
Functions: file scp
7

Just a quick and simple one to demonstrate Bash For loop. Copies 'file' to multiple ssh hosts.

for file in *.png; do convert "$file" "$(basename $file .png).gif"; done
2009-02-15 23:39:08
User: brettalton
Functions: file
3

(relies on 'imagemagick')

Convert all .png files to .gif. This can also go the other way if you reverse the file extensions in the command, e.g.:

for file in *.gif; do convert "$file" "$(basename $file .gif).png"; done

If the file is named 'example1.png' it will be named 'example1.gif' when it is complete.

for file in `ls *.pdf`; do convert -verbose -colorspace RGB -resize 800 -interlace none -density 300 -quality 80 $file `echo $file | sed 's/\.pdf$/\.jpg/'`; done
2009-02-15 23:27:43
User: brettalton
Functions: file sed
28

(relies on 'imagemagick')

This command will convert all .pdf files in a directory into a 800px (wide or height, whichever is smaller) image (with the aspect ratio kept) .jpg.

If the file is named 'example1.pdf' it will be named 'example1.jpg' when it is complete.

This is a VERY worthwhile command! People pay hundreds of dollars for this in the Windows world.

My .jpg files average between 150kB to 300kB, but your's may differ.

split -b 1k file ; cat x* > file
2009-02-08 23:10:18
User: abcde
Functions: cat file split
2

`split -b 1k file` splits files into 1k chunks. Rejoin them with `cat x* > file`.

file !$
2009-02-06 15:41:08
User: leprasmurf
Functions: file
14

Bash shortcut to work with the last argument of your last command

fsutil file createnew FILENAME filesize(inbytes)
2009-02-05 17:36:33
User: archlich
Functions: file
0

This command creates a file of arbitrary size in a windows environment.