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Commands using find from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using find - 1,064 results
find * -maxdepth 0 -type d
2013-02-25 21:10:49
User: sonic
Functions: find

the advantage to doing it this way is that you can adjust the max depth to get more recursive results and run it on non GNU systems. It also won't print trailing slashes, which can easily be removed, but can be slightly annoying..

You could run:

# for file in `find * -maxdepth 0 -type d`;do ls -d $file;done

and in the ls -d part of the command you can put in whatever parameters you want to get things like permissions, time stamps, and ownership.

find ./ -name "*.sh" -exec chmod +x {} \;
2013-02-25 17:14:55
User: Renato
Functions: chmod find

This command is useful to recursively make executable all "*.sh" files in a folder.

This command is useful to apply chmod recursively in a determined kind of file.

find . -type f -size +0 -printf "%-25s%p\n" | sort -n | uniq -D -w 25 | sed 's/^\w* *\(.*\)/md5sum "\1"/' | sh | sort | uniq -w32 --all-repeated=separate
2013-02-23 20:44:20
User: jimetc
Functions: find sed sh sort uniq

Avoids the nested 'find' commands but doesn't seem to run any faster than syssyphus's solution.

sudo find / -type f -name config.inc.php -exec vim -p {} +
2013-02-12 11:00:02
User: sinevar
Functions: find sudo vim

Opening several files at once in Vim can be very easy in connection with find command.

find /path/ -type f -exec grep -l '<string of text>' {} \; | xargs sed -i -e 's%<string of text>%<new text string>%g'
find . -type f -size +100M
find . -name '*.jpg' | awk 'BEGIN{ a=0 }{ printf "mv %s name%01d.jpg\n", $0, a++ }' | bash
2013-02-07 06:12:37
User: doublescythe
Functions: awk find printf

This command will take the files in a directory, rename them, and then number them from 1...N.

Black belt stuff.

Hell of a time saver.

find . -type f -name "*.txt" | while read; do (($(cat $THISFILE | wc -l) < 10)) && rm -vf "$THISFILE"; done
find . -iname '*jpg' -print0 | xargs -0 exiftool -warning; find . -iname '*jpg' -print0 | xargs -0 jpeginfo -c
2013-01-28 16:44:19
Functions: find xargs

This checks jpeg data and metadata, should be grepped as needed, maybe a -B1 Warning for the first, and a -E "WARNING|ERROR" for the second part....

echo '#!/bin/bash' > junk.sh ; find . -iname *.pdf -type f -printf \p\s\2\a\s\c\i\i\ \"%p\"\ \ \"%p\.\t\x\u\"\;\ \p\a\r\ \<\"%p\.\t\x\u\"\ \>\"%p\.\t\x\t\"\ \;\ \r\m\ \"%p\.\t\x\u\"\ \\n >>junk.sh; chmod 766 junk.sh; ./junk.sh ; rm junk.sh
2013-01-27 21:29:08
User: p0g0
Functions: chmod echo find rm

Linux users wanting to extract text from PDF files in the current directory and its sub-directories can use this command. It requires "bash", "ps2ascii" and "par", and the PARINIT environment variable sanely set (see man par). WARNING: the file "junk.sh" will be created, run, and destroyed in the current directory, so you _must_ have sufficient rights. Edit the command if you need to avoid using the file name "junk.sh"

find /var/www/ -name file -exec cp {}{,.bak} \;
2013-01-27 01:03:28
User: joepd
Functions: cp file find

Let the shell handle the repetition in stead of find :)

find /var/www/ -name file -exec cp {} {}.bak \;
for i in `pfiles pid|grep S_IFREG|awk '{print $5}'|awk -F":" '{print $2}'`; do find / -inum $i |xargs ls -lah; done
2013-01-24 13:57:19
User: giorger
Functions: awk find grep ls xargs

Executing pfiles will return a list of all descriptors utilized by the process

We are interested in the S_IFREG entries since they are pointing usually to files

In the line, there is the inode number of the file which we use in order to find the filename.

The only bad thing is that in order not to search from / you have to suspect where could possibly be the file.

Improvements more than welcome.

lsof was not available in my case

find-duplicates () { find "$@" -not -empty -type f -printf "%s\0" | sort -rnz | uniq -dz | xargs -0 -I{} -n1 find "$@" -type f -size {}c -print0 | xargs -0 md5sum | sort | uniq -w32 --all-repeated=separate; }
2013-01-23 23:20:26
User: mpeschke
Functions: find md5sum sort uniq xargs

This is a modified version of the OP, wrapped into a bash function.

This version handles newlines and other whitespace correctly, the original has problems with the thankfully rare case of newlines in the file names.

It also allows checking an arbitrary number of directories against each other, which is nice when the directories that you think might have duplicates don't have a convenient common ancestor directory.

find $folder -name "[1-9]*" -type f -print|while read file; do echo $file $(sed -e '/^$/Q;:a;$!N;s/\n //;ta;s/ /_/g;P;D' $file|awk '/^Received:/&&!r{r=$0}/^From:/&&!f{f=$0}r&&f{printf "%s%s",r,f;exit(0)}');done|sort -k 2|uniq -d -f 1
2013-01-21 22:50:51
User: lpb612
Functions: awk echo find read sed sort uniq

# find assumes email files start with a number 1-9

# sed joins the lines starting with " " to the previous line

# gawk print the received and from lines

# sort according to the second field (received+from)

# uniq print the duplicated filename

# a message is viewed as duplicate if it is received at the same time as another message, and from the same person.

The command was intended to be run under cron. If run in a terminal, mutt can be used:

mutt -e "push otD~=xq" -f $folder

find . -name \*.swp -type f -delete
2013-01-19 07:38:03
User: ashwinkumark
Functions: find
Tags: file remove

Removes all *.swp files underneath the current directory. Replace "*.swp" with your file pattern(s).

find . | while read line; do test `stat -c %u $line` -eq 1003 && chown android:android $line && echo $line; done
perl -MFile::Find=find -MFile::Spec::Functions -Tlwe '$found=1; find { wanted => sub { if (/$ARGV[0]\.pm\z/) { print canonpath $_; $found=0; } }, no_chdir => 1 }, @INC; exit $found;' Collectd/Plugins/Graphite
2013-01-11 11:01:46
User: keymon
Functions: exit find perl

Will check if the given module is installed in the @INC. It will print the path and return 0 if found, or 1 otherwise.

Based on script from SharpyWarpy in http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/linux-general-1/how-to-list-all-installed-perl-modules-216603/

find . -name "*.pdf" -exec pdftk {} dump_data output \; | grep NumberOfPages | awk '{s+=$2} END {print s}'
find . -maxdepth 1 -type l
find . -type l -exec test ! -e {} \; -delete
2012-12-26 06:27:13
User: seb1245
Functions: find test
Tags: find

This command is adapted from http://otomaton.wordpress.com/2012/12/26/find-broken-symbolic-links/

Solutions with

find -L

don't work when the link is a loop, an error message is printed.

find -type f | xargs file | grep ".*: .* text" | sed "s;\(.*\): .* text.*;\1;"
find . -type d | while read dir ; do num=`ls -l $dir | grep '^-' | wc -l` ; echo "$num $dir" ; done | sort -rnk1 | head
diff <(cd dir1 && find . | sort) <(cd dir2 && find . | sort)
find . -name "*.[ch]" -exec grep -i /dev/null "search pharse" {} \;
2012-12-04 20:51:04
User: MikeGoerling
Functions: find grep
Tags: find grep

Old Sys5 system and SUN computers don't have the -H option. Adding /dev/null forces grep to use the multi-file output and report the file name.