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May 19, 2015 - A Look At The New Commandlinefu
I've put together a short writeup on what kind of newness you can expect from the next iteration of clfu. Check it out here.
March 2, 2015 - New Management
I'm Jon, I'll be maintaining and improving clfu. Thanks to David for building such a great resource!

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Commands using find from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using find - 1,064 results
find directory -type l -lname string
2014-05-02 14:44:24
User: gumption
Functions: find
Tags: find

Finds all symbolic links in the specified directory which match the specified string pattern.

I used this when upgrading from an Apple-supported version of Java 6 (1.6.0_65) to an Oracle-supported version (1.7.0_55) on Mac OS X 10.8.5 to find out which executables were pointing to /System/Library/Frameworks/JavaVM.framework/Versions/Current/Commands (Apple version) vs. /Library/Java/JavaVirtualMachines/jdk1.7.0_55.jdk/Contents/Home/bin (Oracle version). However, it appears the current JDK installation script already takes care of modifying the links.

find /some/directory/* -prune -type f -name *.log
2014-05-02 00:14:32
User: bigstupid
Functions: find

This find syntax seems a little easier to remember for me when I have to use -prune on AIX's find. It works with gnu find, too.

Add whatever other find options after -prune

for file in $(find . -name *.mp4); do ogv=${file%%.mp4}.ogv; if test "$file" -nt "$ogv"; then echo $file' is newer then '$ogv; ffmpeg2theora $file; fi done
find . -name \*.svg -print0 | xargs -0 -n1 -P4 -I{} bash -c 'X={}; convert "$X" "${X%.svg}.png"'
2014-04-11 14:30:30
User: flatcap
Functions: bash find xargs

Convert some SVG files into PNG using ImageMagick's convert command.

Run the conversions in parallel to save time.

This is safer than robinro's forkbomb approach :-)

xargs runs four processes at a time -P4

find -type f -exec grep -q "regexp" {} \; -delete
2014-04-06 19:06:50
User: gumnos
Functions: find grep
Tags: find grep

Deletes files in the current directory or its subdirectories that match "regexp" but handle directories, newlines, spaces, and other funky characters better than the original #13315. Also uses grep's "-q" to be quiet and quit at the first match, making this much faster. No need for awk either.

find . | xargs grep -l "FOOBAR" | awk '{print "rm -f "$1}' > doit.sh
2014-04-06 15:48:41
User: sergeylukin
Functions: awk find grep xargs
Tags: awk find grep

After this command you can review doit.sh file before executing it.

If it looks good, execute: `. doit.sh`

for output in $(find . ! -name movie.nfo -name "*.nfo") ; do rm $output ; done
2014-04-01 17:41:50
User: analbeard
Functions: find rm

Finds all nfo files without the filename movie.nfo and deletes them.

find directory -maxdepth 1 -iname "*" | awk 'NR >= 2'
2014-04-01 00:09:12
User: chilicuil
Functions: awk find

find . -maxdepth 1 -iname ".*" | awk 'NR >= 2'

Can be used to list only dotfiles without . nor ..

find . -name '*.mp3' | sort | while read -r mp3; do echo -e "<h3>$mp3</h3>\n<audio controls src=\"$mp3\"></audio>"; done > index.html; python -m http.server
2014-03-24 15:01:49
User: hendry
Functions: echo find python read sort
Tags: audio browser

I tried a few curses based mp3 players for playing back choir practice songs for my wife.

Unfortunately none of the ones I tried were capable of scrubbing a track.

Firefox saves the day.

dmesg | grep -Po 'csum failed ino\S* \d+' | awk '{print $4}' | sort -u | xargs -n 1 find / -inum 2> /dev/null
2014-03-22 12:22:46
User: Sepero
Functions: awk dmesg find grep sort xargs
Tags: find inode btrfs

Btrfs reports the inode numbers of files with failed checksums. Use `find` to lookup the file names of those inodes. The files may need to be deleted and replaced with backups.

find ./ -type l -ls
find ./ -type l -print0 | xargs -0 ls -plah
2014-03-20 20:36:39
Functions: find ls xargs

shows you the symlinks in the current directory, recursively, but without following them

dmesg | grep -Po 'csum failed ino\S* \d+' | sort | uniq | xargs -n 3 find / -inum 2> /dev/null
2014-03-20 06:27:15
User: Sepero
Functions: dmesg find grep sort uniq xargs
Tags: find inode btrfs

Btrfs reports the inode numbers of files with failed checksums. Use `find` to lookup the file names of those inodes.

dsquery computer DC=example,DC=com -limit 150 | find /c /v ""
find . -name "*.txt" -exec WHATEVER_COMMAND {} \;
find . \( -iname "*.doc" -o -iname "*.docx" \) -type f -exec ls -l --full-time {} +|sort -k 6,7
find . -name "*.txt" | xargs -n 1 perl -pi -w -e "s/text([0-9])/other\$1/g;"
2014-02-28 06:38:38
User: kennethjor
Functions: find perl xargs

Does a search and replace across multiple files with a subgroup replacement.

for i in $(find . -regex '.*\/C.*\.cpp'); do svn mv `perl -e 'my $s=$ARGV[0]; $s=~m/(.*\/)C(.*)/; print "$s $1$2"' "$i"`; done
find . -type d| while read i; do echo $(ls -1 "$i"|wc -m) $(du -s "$i"); done|sort -s -n -k1,1 -k2,2 |awk -F'[ \t]+' '{ idx=$1$2; if (array[idx] == 1) {print} else if (array[idx]) {print array[idx]; print; array[idx]=1} else {array[idx]=$0}}'
2014-02-25 22:50:09
User: knoppix5
Functions: awk du echo find ls read sort wc

Very quick! Based only on the content sizes and the character counts of filenames. If both numbers are equal then two (or more) directories seem to be most likely identical.

if in doubt apply:

diff -rq path_to_dir1 path_to_dir2

AWK function taken from here:


find . -exec chmod o+rx {}\;
find . -exec grep -Hn what \{\} \; | less
2014-02-17 09:59:01
User: ynedelchev
Functions: find grep what

This command will traverse all of the folders and subfolders under current working directory. For every file inside it, it will do a search inside the content of the file for a specific term 'what'. Then it will print a list of the lines that contain that term (and match that pattern). Each matching line will be preceded with the path and name to the file and then the line number iside taht file wehre the pattern was found. Then the actual content of the matching lien will be printed.

The output will be piped throug less, so that the user can scroll through it if it goes beyond the limits of the current display window.

find . -name *.properties -exec /bin/echo {} \; -exec cat {} \; | grep -E 'listen|properties'
find . \( -not -path "./boost*" \) -type f \( -name "*.jpg" -or -name "*.png" -or -name "*.jpeg" \) 2>/dev/null
2014-02-13 09:11:11
Functions: find

If you need to find some pictures on your disk but excluding some path.

find /logdir -type f -mtime +7 -print0 | xargs -0 -n 1 nice -n 20 bzip2 -9
find $1 -not -iwholename "*.svn*" -type f | xargs md5sum | awk '{print $2 "\t" $1}'
2014-02-12 19:04:08
User: dronamk
Functions: awk find md5sum xargs

recurse through all files, get the message hash, flip the output as filename, hash value