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Functions

Commands using find from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using find - 1,081 results
find . \( -iname '*.[ch]' -o -iname '*.php' -o -iname '*.pl' \) -exec wc -l {} \; | sort
2010-04-28 07:18:21
User: rkulla
Functions: find wc
Tags: find count code
2

Gives you a nice quick summary of how many lines each of your files is comprised of. (In this example, we just check .c, .h, .php and .pl). Since we just use wc -l to count, you'll just get a very rough estimate of how many lines of actual code there are. Use a more sophisticated algorithm instead if you need to.

find . -type d -name .svn -exec chmod g+s "{}" \;
2010-04-27 16:51:00
User: mitzip
Functions: chmod find
2

The above command will set the GID bit on all directories named .svn in the current directory recursively. This makes the group ownership of all .svn folders be the group ownership for all files created in that folder, no matter the user.

This is useful for me as the subversion working directory on my server is also the live website and needs to be auto committed to subversion every so often via cron as well as worked on by multiple users. Setting the GID bit on the .svn folders makes sure we don't have a mix of .svn metadata created by a slew of different users.

for dir in $(find -type d ! -name CVS); do for file in $(find $dir -maxdepth 1 -type f); do rm $file; cvs delete $file; done; done
2010-04-27 16:03:33
User: ubersoldat
Functions: cvs dir file find rm
Tags: bash cvs delete rm
2

This will search all directories and ignore the CVS ones. Then it will search all files in the resulting directories and act on them.

find ~ -maxdepth 2 -name .git -print | while read repo; do cd $(dirname $repo); git pull; done
find . -maxdepth 1 -type f | xargs stat
2010-04-26 20:51:54
User: asolkar
Functions: find xargs
2

Possible simplification of egrep-awk-sort with find and -exec with xargs.

find -name `egrep -s '.' * | awk -F":" '{print $1}' | sort -u` -exec stat {} \;
2010-04-26 20:01:44
Functions: awk find sort stat
1

This will run stat on each file in the directory.

find ./ -name *.h -exec egrep -cH "// | /\*" {} \; | awk -F':' '{print $2 ":" $1}' | sort -gr
2010-04-23 19:00:07
User: blocky
Functions: awk egrep find sort
1

This shows you which files are most in need of commenting (one line of output per file)

find ~/.mozilla/firefox/*/Cache -exec file {} \; | awk -F ': ' 'tolower($2)~/mpeg/{print $1}'
2010-04-19 06:59:55
User: sata
Functions: awk file find
2

Grab a list of MP3s (with full path) out of Firefox's cache

Ever gone to a site that has an MP3 embedded into a pesky flash player, but no download link? Well, this one-liner will yank the *full path* of those tunes straight out of FF's cache in a clean list.

Shorter and Intuitive version of the command submitted by (TuxOtaku)

mplayer -playlist <(find $PWD -type f)
2010-04-17 00:20:08
User: rkulla
Functions: find
0

Press > or < to go to the next or previous track. Space to toggle play/pause, etc.

It creates a temp file descriptor. To see where the file descriptor gets created type: echo <(echo foo)

This works better than running find first, then piping to mplayer with xargs or something, because that won't let you use keyboard shortcuts.

printf "\n%25s%10sTOTAL\n" 'FILE TYPE' ' '; for ext in $(find . -iname \*.* | egrep -o '\.[^[:space:].]+$' | egrep -v '\.svn*' | sort -f | uniq -i); do count=$(find . -iname \*$ext | wc -l); printf "%25s%10s%d\n" $ext ' ' $count; done
2010-04-16 21:12:11
User: rkulla
Functions: egrep find printf sort uniq wc
0

I created this command to give me a quick overview of how many file types a directory, and all its subdirectories, contains. It works based off file extension, rather than file(1)'s magic output, because it ended up being more accurate and less confusing.

Files that don't have an ext (README) are generally not important for me to want to count, but you're free to customize this fit your needs.

S='<iframe src=\"http:\/\/254.254.254.254\/bad\/index.php\" width=\"1\" height=\"1\" frameborder=\"0\"><\/iframe>' && R=''; find . -name "*.html" -exec grep -l "$S" {} \; | xargs sed -i -e "s/$S/$R/g"
2010-04-12 21:45:16
User: rexington
Functions: find grep sed xargs
-1

Removes the given string from all files under the given path - in this case the path given is "." This demonstrates the characters that must be escaped for the grep and sed commands to do their work correctly. Very handy for fixing hacked html files.

find . -name "*.html" -exec grep -l 'string' {} \;
2010-04-12 20:47:25
User: rexington
Functions: find grep
0

This will search for "string" in all files under the given path "." and provide a listing of the files with their relative locations.

find . -mtime +10 -delete
2010-04-12 15:05:17
User: rexington
Functions: find
2

This will find all files under the path "." which are older than 10 days, and delete them. If you wish to use the "rm" command instead, replace "-delete" with "-exec rm [options] {} \;"

find . -mtime +10
2010-04-12 14:50:08
User: rexington
Functions: find
0

This will find all files in the path "." which are older than 10*24hrs (10 days). This will find any type of file.

vim $(find . ! -path \*.svn\* -type f -iname \*foo\*)
2010-04-11 23:32:41
User: rkulla
Functions: find vim
Tags: vim find
2

This command searches the current directory, and all of its subdirs, for files that have the string "foo" in their filename (foo.c, two-foo.txt, index-FOO-bar.php, etc), and opens them in Vim. It ignores any hidden .svn directories. Change -iname to -name if you want to do case-sensitive matches.

Files open in buffers by default, so to verify that the correct files were opened, type ":list". You can load all the files in tabs by doing ":tab ball" or use 'vim -p' on the command-line to load files straight to tabs.

If you get permission denied errors, do: vim $(find . ! -path \*.svn\* -type -f iname \*foo\* 2>/dev/null)

To narrow it down to a single file extension, such as .php files, use \*foo\*.php (or '*foo*.php'. Which ever you prefer)

find . \( -type d -empty \) -and \( -not -regex ./\.git.* \) -exec touch {}/.gitignore \;
find ./ -iname "*.djvu" -execdir perl -e '@s=`djvutxt \"$ARGV[0]\"\|grep -c Berlekamp`; chomp @s; print $s[0]; print " $ARGV[0]\n"' '{}' \;|sort -n
2010-04-07 11:15:26
Functions: find grep perl sort
0

Count the occurences of the word 'Berlekamp' in the DJVU files that are in the current directory, printing file names from the one having the least to the most occurences.

find . -name 'pattern'| xargs du -hc
find . -type d -name '*[A-Z]*' -execdir bash -c '! test -f "$(echo "$0" | tr "[:upper:]" "[:lower:]")"' {} \; -execdir bash -c 'mv "$0" "$(echo "$0" | tr "[:upper:]" "[:lower:]")"' {} \;
find . -type f -iname '*.msh' -exec ls -lG {} \; | awk '{total = total + $4}END{print "scale=2;" total "/2^20"}' | bc
find . -maxdepth 1 -name "*.zip" -exec unzip -tqq {} \;
2010-03-30 08:28:36
User: shantanuo
Functions: find
0

if you remove maxdepth, then all the folders will be searched and the status of zip file will be displayed only if it is corrupt.

find . -name file.txt | xargs -e grep "token" -o | wc -l
find ${PATH//:/ } -iname "*admin*" -executable -type f
2010-03-29 10:20:07
User: sanmiguel
Functions: find
Tags: bash find unix
1

While it seems (to me at least) a little counter-intuitive to filter on name first, this requires less work for find, as it allows it to immediately discount any files that do not match the name directly from the directory listing on disk. Querying against file attributes requires reading the file attributes, which is performed for all files matching any name based predicates.

find -D rates . -name "*.mp3" -type f
find * \( -name "*.[hc]pp" -or -name "*.py" -or -name "*.i" \) -print0 | xargs -0 wc -l | tail -n 1
2010-03-25 18:58:29
User: neologism
Functions: find tail wc xargs
Tags: find xargs wc
1

Finds all C++, Python, SWIG files in your present directory (uses "*" rather than "." to exclude invisibles) and counts how many lines are in them. Returns only the last line (the total).