Hide

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again.

Delete that bloated snippets file you've been using and share your personal repository with the world. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.


Get involved!

You can sign-in using OpenID credentials, or register a traditional username and password.

First-time OpenID users will be automatically assigned a username which can be changed after signing in.

Universal configuration monitoring and system of record for IT.
Hide

Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for:

Hide

News

May 19, 2015 - A Look At The New Commandlinefu
I've put together a short writeup on what kind of newness you can expect from the next iteration of clfu. Check it out here.
March 2, 2015 - New Management
I'm Jon, I'll be maintaining and improving clfu. Thanks to David for building such a great resource!
Hide

Top Tags

Hide

Functions

Psst. Open beta.

Wow, didn't really expect you to read this far down. The latest iteration of the site is in open beta. It's a gentle open beta-- not in prime-time just yet. It's being hosted over at UpGuard (link) and you are more than welcome to give it a shot. Couple things:

  • » The open beta is running a copy of the database that will not carry over to the final version. Don't post anything you don't mind losing.
  • » If you wish to use your user account, you will probably need to reset your password.
Your feedback is appreciated via the form on the beta page. Thanks! -Jon & CLFU Team

Commands using find from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using find - 1,074 results
sudo find /etc/rc{1..5}.d -name S99myservice -type l -exec sh -c 'NEWFN=`echo {} | sed 's/S99/K99/'` ; mv -v {} $NEWFN' \;
2010-01-03 00:56:57
User: zoomgarden
Functions: find mv sed sh sudo
0

Change run control links from start "S" to stop "K" (kill) for whatever run levels in curly braces for a service called "myservice". NEWFN variable is for the new filename stored in the in-line shell. Use different list of run levels (rc*.d, rc{1,3,5}.d, etc.) and/or swap S with K in the command to change function of run control links.

find /path/to/images -name '*.JPG' -exec rename "s/.JPG/.jpg/g" \{\} \;
2010-01-02 19:12:37
User: renich
Functions: find rename
Tags: find rename
8

This command is useful for renaming a clipart, pic gallery or your photo collection. It will only change the big caps to small ones (on the extension).

find . -exec grep $foo {} \; -print
2009-12-30 17:41:44
User: linuxgeek
Functions: find grep
-1

The command will help to print the location of the pattern. Above command will print all the files which contain variable "$foo" along with line containing that pattern.

Specify pattern after "grep"

find dir -size -1024k -type f -print0 | du --files0-from - -bc
2009-12-29 01:33:55
User: bhepple
Functions: dir du find
Tags: size sum
2

The original didn't use -print0 which fails on weird file names eg with spaces.

The original parsed the output of 'ls -l' which is always a bad idea.

find dir -size -1024k -type f | xargs -d $'\n' -n1 ls -l | cut -d ' ' -f 5 | sed -e '2,$s/$/+/' -e '$ap' | dc
2009-12-28 04:23:01
User: zhangweiwu
Functions: cut dir find ls sed xargs
Tags: size sum
1

The command gives size of all files smaller than 1024k, this information, together with disk usage, can help determin file system parameter (e.g. block size) or storage device (e.g. SSD v.s. HDD).

Note if you use awk instead of "cut| dc", you easily breach maximum allowed number of records in awk.

find /home/bubo/ -type f \( -iname \*.jpg -print0 , -iname \*.png -print0 , -iname \*gif -print0 \) | du -cm --files0-from - | tail -1
find . -name '*png' -printf '%h\0' | xargs -0 ls -l --hide=*.png | grep -ZB1 ' 0$'
find . -print -exec chmod 777 {} \;
2009-12-23 13:16:31
User: ringlerun
Functions: chmod find
-10

sometimes if directories are too deep, chmod -R fails... in those cases, a find comes in most handy :)

find | xargs chmod 777
find . \! -type d | rev | sort | rev | tar c --files-from=- --format=ustar | bzip2 --best > a.tar.bz2
2009-12-20 14:04:39
User: pornel
Functions: bzip2 c++ find rev sort tar
2

Avoids creating useless directory entries in archive, and sorts files by (roughly) extension, which is likely to group similar files together for better compression. 1%-5% improvement.

find . -name "*.php" -exec php -l {} \;
find ./wp-content/themes/rotce2009/ -name '*.php' -type f | xargs sed -i 's/<? /<?php /g'
tar -cvzf arch.tgz $(find /path/dir -not -type d)
2009-12-15 13:46:54
User: pysquared
Functions: find tar
3

If you give tar a list of filenames, it will not add the directories, so if you don't care about directory ownership or permissions, you can save some space.

Tar will create directories as necessary when extracting.

This command is limited by the maximum supported size of the argument list, so if you are trying to tar up the whole OS for instance, you may just get "Argument list too long".

find . -maxdepth 1 -type d -not -name . -exec du -sh {} +
2009-12-11 14:37:26
User: sorpigal
Functions: du find
-6

Parsing the output of ls is never a good idea for any reason. Using find this way:

- works with files that have spaces in their names.

- actually lists "sub folders" and not of all files and folders.

- does not break if there are a huge number of files in the current directory.

find . -iname "*.jpg" -print0 | tr '[A-Z]' '[a-z]' | xargs -0 cp --backup=numbered -dp -u --target-directory {location} &
2009-12-10 08:47:04
User: oracular
Functions: cp find tr xargs
4

Use if you have pictures all over the place and you want to copy them to a central location

Synopsis:

Find jpg files

translate all file names to lowercase

backup existing, don't overwrite, preserve mode ownership and timestamps

copy to a central location

find /path/to/dir/ -type f -exec rm {} +
mkdir myicons; find /usr/share/icons/ -type f -exec cp {} ./myicons/ \;
mkdir myicons && find /usr/share/icons/ -type f | xargs cp -t myicons
2009-12-09 17:43:28
User: rodolfoap
Functions: cp find mkdir xargs
Tags: icons
2

Today I needed to choose an icon for an app. My simpler way: put all of /usr/share/icons in myicons folder and brows'em with nautilus. Then rm -r 'ed the entire dir.

find /path/to/dir -type f -delete
2009-12-09 01:30:52
User: SlimG
Functions: find
9

Optimal way of deleting huge numbers of files

Using -delete is faster than:

find /path/to/dir -type f -print0 | xargs -0 rm find /path/to/dir -type f -exec rm {} + find /path/to/dir -type f -exec rm \-f {} \;
find . -type f -exec sed -i s/oldstring/newstring/g {} +
2009-12-09 00:46:13
User: SlimG
Functions: find sed
Tags: sed find
15

This command find all files in the current dir and subdirs, and replace all occurances of "oldstring" in every file with "newstring".

find . -type f -iname '*.mp3' -exec cp {} ~/mp3/ \;
2009-12-09 00:19:14
User: SlimG
Functions: cp find
1

This command copies all filenames in the current dir and subdirs that end in .mp3 regardless of case (also matches .MP3 .mP3 and .Mp3)

It copies all the files to the "mp3" folder in your home directory.

If you want to see the files that are beeing copied, replace "cp {}" with "cp -v {}"

find . -iname '*.mp3' -type f -print0 | xargs -I{} -0 cp {} </path>
2009-12-08 20:50:48
User: sputnick
Functions: cp find xargs
5

No problem with word splitting. That should works on many Unix likes.

find . -name '*.mp3' -type f -exec sh -c 'exec cp -f "$@" /home/user/dir' find-copy {} +
2009-12-08 19:31:16
User: mariusz
Functions: cp find sh
1

I used this command to recursively gather all mp3 files that were previously imported into their own directories (sorted by band name) in Songbird.

find . -type d -exec sh -c "normalize-audio -b \"{}\"/*.mp3" \;
2009-12-08 03:13:13
Functions: find sh
-2

Execute this in the root of your music library and this recurses through the directories and normalizes each folder containing mp3s as a batch. This assumes those folders hold an album each. The command "normalize-audio" may go by "normalize" on some systems.

find . -type f -perm +200 -print