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Commands using grep from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using grep - 1,668 results
awk '/d[a-z]+$/{print $4}' /proc/partitions | xargs -i sudo hdparm -I /dev/{} | grep 'device size with M'
for I in $(awk '/d[a-z]+$/{print $4}' /proc/partitions); do sudo hdparm -I '/dev/'$I; done | grep 'device size with M'
2010-03-02 18:56:32
User: ElAlecs
Functions: awk grep hdparm size sudo
Tags: hdparm
0

I know this sucks in some way but if someone can improve it please be my guest

sed 's+href="\([^"]*\)"+\n\1\n+g' bookmarks.html | grep '^http' |clive
2010-03-01 20:17:22
Functions: grep sed
0

Parses your exported bookmarks to generate a clean list of http lines and passes it on to clive to try to download the video file from various sites.

grep "^V<TAB>" your_file
2010-03-01 08:46:02
User: sathyz
Functions: grep
Tags: grep
9

mixing tabs and spaces for indentation in python would confuse the python interpreter, to avoid that, check if the file has any tab based indentation.

"^V" => denotes press control + v and press tab within quotes.

cat improper_indent.py

class Tux(object):

print "Hello world.."

grep " " improper_indent.py

print "Hello world.."

ifconfig -a| grep -o -E '([[:xdigit:]]{1,2}:){5}[[:xdigit:]]{1,2}'
2010-02-27 14:30:43
User: evenme
Functions: grep ifconfig
Tags: ifconfig grep
3

Get mac address listed for all interfaces.

psgrep() { if [ ! -z $1 ]; then echo "Grepping for processes matching $1..." ps aux | grep -i $1 | grep -v grep; else echo "!! Need name to grep for"; fi }
2010-02-27 13:47:28
User: evenme
Functions: echo grep ps
Tags: grep ps
-4

Grep for a named process.

svn status | grep -v ? | awk '{print $2}' > file.svn.txt && svn ci --targets file.svn.txt -m "[your commit message here]"
TOTAL_RAM=`free | head -n 2 | tail -n 1 | awk '{ print $2 }'`; PROC_RSS=`ps axo rss,comm | grep [h]ttpd | awk '{ TOTAL += $1 } END { print TOTAL }'`; PROC_PCT=`echo "scale=4; ( $PROC_RSS/$TOTAL_RAM ) * 100" | bc`; echo "RAM Used by HTTP: $PROC_PCT%"
2010-02-26 20:29:45
User: d34dh0r53
Functions: awk echo grep head tail
6

Change the name of the process and what is echoed to suit your needs. The brackets around the h in the grep statement cause grep to skip over "grep httpd", it is the equivalent of grep -v grep although more elegant.

function skreemplay() { lynx -dump "http://skreemr.com/results.jsp?q=$*" | grep mp3$ | sed 's/^.* //' | xargs mplayer }
2010-02-24 08:44:01
User: thelan
Functions: grep sed xargs
1

This use the Screemr search engine to play mp3 songs

ls -RAx | grep "svn:$" | sed -e "s/svn:/svn/" | xargs rm -fr
/usr/sbin/dmidecode | grep -i "current speed"
svn log -r {`date "+%Y-%m-%d"`}:HEAD|grep '^r[0-9]' |cut -d\| -f2|sort|uniq -c
file /usr/bin/* | grep ELF | cut -d":" -f1
2010-02-17 14:01:52
Functions: cut file grep
-1

This is a dirty raw way to simply list ELF objects in a folder.

The output is ready to be parsed i.e to the stripper or what else needs a path to an ELF object.

spellcheck(){ typeset [email protected];curl -sd "<spellrequest><text>$y</text></spellrequest>" https://www.google.com/tbproxy/spell|sed -n '/s="[0-9]"/{s/<[^>]*>/ /g;s/\t/ /g;s/ *\(.*\)/Suggestions: \1\n/g;p}'|tee >(grep -Eq '.*'||echo -e "OK");}
2010-02-17 08:20:48
User: eightmillion
Functions: echo grep sed tee
5

I took matthewbauer's cool one-liner and rewrote it as a shell function that returns all the suggestions or outputs "OK" if it doesn't find anything wrong. It should work on ksh, zsh, and bash. Users that don't have tee can leave that part off like this:

spellcheck(){ typeset [email protected];curl -sd "<spellrequest><text>$y</text></spellrequest>" https://google.com/tbproxy/spell|sed -n '/s="[1-9]"/{s/<[^>]*>/ /g;s/\t/ /g;s/ *\(.*\)/Suggestions: \1\n/g;p}';}
spellcheck(){ curl -sd "<spellrequest><text>$1</text></spellrequest>" https://www.google.com/tbproxy/spell | sed 's/.*<spellresult [^>]*>\(.*\)<\/spellresult>/\1/;s/<c \([^>]*\)>\([^<]*\)<\/c>/\1;\2\n/g' | grep 's="1"' | sed 's/^.*;\([^\t]*\).*$/\1/'; }
ls *.jpg | grep -n "" | sed 's,.*,0000&,' | sed 's,0*\(...\):\(.*\).jpg,mv "\2.jpg" "image-\1.jpg",' | sh
curl -s -u $username:$password http://192.168.1.1/DHCPTable.htm | grep '<td>.* </td>' | sed 's|\t<td>\(.*\) </td>\r|\1|' | tr '\n' ';' | sed 's/\([^;]*\);\([^;]*\);/\2\t\1\n/g'
2010-02-16 02:27:11
User: matthewbauer
Functions: grep sed tr
0

Will create a sample etc host file based on your router's dhcp list.

Now I know this won't work on most routers, so please don't downvote it just because it doesn't work for you.

for i in `ndd /dev/ip \? | awk '{ print $1 }' | egrep -v "ip6|status|icmp|igmp|\?"` ; do echo $i `ndd -get /dev/ip $i` ; done | grep -v \?
2010-02-15 12:32:33
User: felix001
Functions: awk echo egrep grep
0

This command is jsut for the main IP settings of ndd. if you need ip6 or icmp edit the text within the egrep inclusion area.

Felix001 - www.Fir3net.com

pdftotext [file] - | grep 'YourPattern'
2010-02-14 21:42:35
User: drewk
Functions: grep
Tags: pipe grep pdf
27

PDF files are simultaneously wonderful and heinous. They are wonderful in being ubiquitous and mostly being cross platform. They are heinous in being very difficult to work with from the command line, search, grep, use only the text inside the PDF, or use outside of proprietary products.

xpdf is a wonderful set of PDF tools. It is on many linux distros and can be installed on OS X. While primarily an open PDF viewer for X, xpdf has the tool "pdftotext" that can extract formated or unformatted text from inside a PDF that has text. This text stream can then be further processed by grep or other tool. The '-' after the file name directs output to stdout rather than to a text file the same name as the PDF.

Make sure you use version 3.02 of pdftotext or later; earlier versions clipped lines.

The lines extracted from a PDF without the "-layout" option are very long. More paragraphs. Use just to test that a pattern exists in the file. With "-layout" the output resembles the lines, but it is not perfect.

xpdf is available open source at http://www.foolabs.com/xpdf/

grep -c ^processor /proc/cpuinfo
xrandr -q | grep -w Screen
username=matthewbauer; curl -s http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/by/$username/json | tr '{' '\n' | grep -Eo ',"votes":"[0-9\-]+","' | grep -Eo '[0-9\-]+' | tr '\n' '+' | sed 's/+$/\n/' | bc
2010-02-14 04:32:36
User: matthewbauer
Functions: grep sed tr
8

This will calculate the your commandlinefu votes (upvotes - downvotes).

Hopefully this will boost my commandlinefu points.

curl -s http://www.google.com/ig/api?weather=$(curl -s "http://api.hostip.info/get_html.php?ip=$(curl -s icanhazip.com)" | grep City | sed 's/City: \(.*\)/\1/' | sed 's/ /%20/g' | sed "s/'/%27/g") | sed 's|.*<temp_f data="\([^"]*\)"/>.*|\1\n|'
uri_escape(){ echo -E "[email protected]" | sed 's/\\/\\\\/g;s/./&\n/g' | while read -r i; do echo $i | grep -q '[a-zA-Z0-9/.:?&=]' && echo -n "$i" || printf %%%x \'"$i" done }
2010-02-13 01:39:51
User: infinull
Functions: echo grep printf read sed
1

This one uses hex conversion to do the converting and is in shell/sed only (should probably still use the python/perl version).

grep -rF --include='*.txt' stringYouLookFor *
2010-02-12 18:07:07
User: maxleonca
Functions: grep
1

The -r is for recursive, -F for fixed strings, --include='*.txt' identifies you want all txt files to be search any wildcard will apply, then the string you are looking for and the final * to ensure you go through all files and folders within the folder you execute it.