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Commands using grep from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using grep - 1,628 results
ipcs -a | grep 0x | awk '{printf( "-Q %s ", $1 )}' | xargs ipcrm
svn add $(svn st|grep ^\?|cut -c2-)
2010-01-28 09:48:46
User: inkel
Functions: cut grep
Tags: bash svn grep cut
0

This version makes uses of Bash shell expansion, so it might not work in all other shells.

svn status |grep '\?' |awk '{print $2}'| parallel -Xj1 svn add
2010-01-28 08:47:54
Functions: awk grep
Tags: xargs parallel
-2

xargs deals badly with special characters (such as space, ' and "). To see the problem try this:

touch important_file

touch 'not important_file'

ls not* | xargs rm

Parallel https://savannah.nongnu.org/projects/parallel/ does not have this problem.

grep -rl oldstring . | parallel sed -i -e 's/oldstring/newstring/'
2010-01-28 08:44:16
Functions: grep sed
4

xargs deals badly with special characters (such as space, ' and "). To see the problem try this:

touch important_file

touch 'not important_file'

ls not* | xargs rm

Parallel https://savannah.nongnu.org/projects/parallel/ does not have this problem.

grep -E '^(cn|mail):' file.ldif | sed -e 's/^[a-z]*: //'
find filepath -type f -iname "*.html" -o -iname "*.htm" -o -iname "*.php" | xargs grep "Exception\|LGPL\|CODE1"
mgc() { grep --exclude=cscope* --color=always -rni $1 . |perl -pi -e 's/:/ +/' |perl -pi -e 's/^(.+)$/vi $1/g' |perl -pi -e 's/:/ /'; }
2010-01-26 17:00:01
Functions: grep perl
1

This is a big time saver for me. I often grep source code and need to edit the findings. A single highlight of the mouse and middle mouse click (in gnome terminal) and I'm editing the exact line I just found. The color highlighting helps interpret the data.

grep -rni string dir
2010-01-26 16:34:06
Functions: grep
2

Print line numbers also, so you don't have to search through the files once its open for the string you already grepped for.

grep -r -i "phrase" directory/
2010-01-26 16:27:00
User: TheFox
Functions: grep
8

-R, -r, --recursive

Read all files under each directory, recursively; this is equivalent to the -d recurse option.

for host in $(cat ftps.txt) ; do if echo -en "o $host 21\nquit\n" |telnet 2>/dev/null |grep -v 'Connected to' >/dev/null; then echo -en "FTP $host KO\n"; fi done
2010-01-26 15:34:18
User: vlan7
Functions: cat echo grep host telnet
1

I must monitorize a couple of ftp servers every morning WITHOUT a port-scanner

Instead of ftp'ing on 100 ftp servers manually to test their status I use this loop.

It might be adaptable to other services, however it may require a 'logout' string instead of 'quit'.

The file ftps.txt contains the full list of ftp servers to monitorize.

find directory/ |xargs grep -i "phrase"
ls /usr/bin | xargs whatis | grep -v nothing | less
2010-01-26 12:59:47
User: michelsberg
Functions: grep ls whatis xargs
12

no loop, only one call of grep, scrollable ("less is more", more or less...)

if [ $(synclient -l | grep TouchpadOff | awk '{print $3}') = "2" ]; then synclient TouchpadOff=1; elif [ $(synclient -l | grep TouchpadOff | awk '{print $3}') == "1" ]; then synclient TouchpadOff=2; else synclient TouchpadOff=2; fi
2010-01-26 07:52:55
User: GinoMan2440
Functions: awk grep
-3

This command toggles the touchpad on and off, when it's on, the right side scroll strip (annoying) and the tap-clicking are disabled, you can change this by changing occurances of 2 in the command to 0. this whole command can then be given a keyboard shortcut so that the touchpad is disableable without using a special fn key (which linux doesn't recognize on some computers) or a seperate button.

for i in $(ls /usr/bin); do whatis $i | grep -v nothing; done | more
dpkg -l | grep ^rc | awk '{print $2}' | sudo xargs dpkg -P
find . -type f -exec stat \{\} \; | grep Modify: | awk '{a[$2]++}END{for(i in a){print i " : " a[i] }}' | sort
fping -r1 -g <subnet> 2> /dev/null | grep unreachable | cut -f1 -d' '
curl -u <username> http://app.boxee.tv/api/get_queue | xml2 | grep /boxeefeed/message/description | awk -F= '{print $2}'
2010-01-20 16:17:19
User: Strawp
Functions: awk grep
Tags: curl xml boxee
0

Might be able to do it in less steps with xmlstarlet, although whether that would end up being shorter overall I don't know - xmlstarlet syntax confuses the heck out of me.

Prompts for your password, or if you're a bit mental you can add your password into the command itself in the format "-u user:password".

sqlite3 -list /home/$USER/.mozilla/firefox/*.default/places.sqlite 'select url from moz_places ;' | grep http
2010-01-18 15:25:00
User: bubo
Functions: grep
2

if firefox is running the database is locked, so you need to copy the places.sqlite file temporarily somewhere to be able to query it...

find . -exec grep -l "sample" {} \;
2010-01-16 13:12:52
User: whoami
Functions: find grep
-8

Will find all files containing "sample" in the current directory and in the directories below.

find . -name "*.php" -exec grep -il searchphrase {} \;
2010-01-16 05:09:30
Functions: find grep
-1

This is very similar to the first example except that it employs the 'exec' argument of the find command rather than piping the result to xargs. The second example is nice and tidy but different *NIXs may not have as capable a grep command.

grep -rHi searchphrase *.php
find . -name "*.php" | xargs grep -il searchphrase
2010-01-14 22:42:36
User: refrax
Functions: find grep xargs
2

This command will find all files recursively containing the phrase entered, represented here by "searchphrase". This particular command searches in all php files, but you could change that to just be html files or just log files etc.

while (ps -ef | grep [r]unning_program_name); do sleep 10; done; command_to_execute
2010-01-14 16:26:34
User: m_a_xim
Functions: grep ps sleep
-2

The '[r]' is to avoid grep from grepping itself. (interchange 'r' by the appropriate letter)

Here is an example that I use a lot (as root or halt will not work):

while (ps -ef | grep [w]get); do sleep 10; done; sleep 60; halt

I add the 'sleep 60' command just in case something went wrong; so that I have time to cancel.

Very useful if you are going to bed while downloading something and do not want your computer running all night.

find /lib/modules/`uname -r`/ -type f -iname '*.o' -or -iname '*.ko' |grep -i -o '[a-z0-9]*[-|_]*[0-9a-z]*\.ko$' |xargs -I {} echo '# {}' >>/etc/modules.autoload.d/kernel-2.6
2010-01-13 02:12:08
User: paragao
Functions: echo find grep xargs
-1

Whenever you compile a new kernel, there are always new modules. The best way to make sure you have the correct modules loaded when you boot is to add all your modules in the modules.autoload file (they will be commented) and uncomment all those modules you need.

Also a good way to keep track of the available modules in your system.

For other distros you may have to change the name of the file to /etc/modprobe.conf