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Commands using grep from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using grep - 1,625 results
ps axww | grep SomeCommand | awk '{ print $1 }' | xargs kill
2009-02-28 17:48:51
User: philiph
Functions: awk grep ps xargs
-7

This command kills all processes with 'SomeCommand' in the process name. There are other more elegant ways to extract the process names from ps but they are hard to remember and not portable across platforms. Use this command with caution as you could accidentally kill other matching processes!

xargs is particularly handy in this case because it makes it easy to feed the process IDs to kill and it also ensures that you don't try to feed too many PIDs to kill at once and overflow the command-line buffer.

Note that if you are attempting to kill many thousands of runaway processes at once you should use 'kill -9'. Otherwise the system will try to bring each process into memory before killing it and you could run out of memory. Typically when you want to kill many processes at once it is because you are already in a low memory situation so if you don't 'kill -9' you will make things worse

svn status | grep '^\?' | sed -e 's/^\?//g' | xargs svn add
2009-02-28 03:00:28
User: dollyaswin
Functions: grep sed xargs
0

These part of the command:

svn status | grep '^\?' => find new file or directory on working copy

sed -e 's/^\?//g' => remove "^" character on the first character of file name

xargs svn add => add file to subversion repository

You can modify above command to other circumtances, like revert addition files or commit files that have been modified. ^_^

aptitude show $PROGRAM | grep Vers
2009-02-27 23:24:37
User: aabilio
Functions: grep
-1

Output: Version 3.2-0 (for example if you type # aptitude show bash | grep Vers

Depends on the language of your distribution, because the name of the word "Version" in other languages may be different.

grep "FOUND" /var/log/squidclamav.log | awk '{print $5"-"$2"-"$3","$4","$11}' | sed -e 's/\,http.*url=/\,/g' | sed -e 's/&/\,/g' | sed -e 's/source=//g' |sed -e 's/user=//g' | sed -e 's/virus=//g' | sed -e 's/stream\:+//g' | sed -e 's/\+FOUND//g'
2009-02-27 13:28:18
User: nablas
Functions: awk grep sed
0

This command will list a CSV list of infected files detected by clamav through squidclamav redirector.

ls -l | grep ^d
2009-02-26 20:28:10
User: sysadmn
Functions: grep ls
1

Show only the subdirectories in the current directory. In the example above, /lib has 135 files and directories. With this command, the 9 dirs jump out.

rpm -qa | grep PACKAGENAME | xargs rpm -q --filesbypkg
2009-02-26 14:32:12
User: piscue
Functions: grep rpm xargs
1

rpm, sometimes, is not wildcard friendly. To search files installed from package this could be useful.

change PACKAGENAME to any package do you want to search

dmidecode | grep -i prod
2009-02-25 23:05:17
User: rockon
Functions: grep
6

This command gives a model information of a computer. Also useful in determining the host is a VM machine or actual physical machine.

IPADDR=`ifconfig eth0 | grep -i inet | awk -F: '{print $2}'| awk '{print $1}'`
2009-02-25 22:58:19
User: rockon
Functions: awk grep
0

Useful in scripts while you just need an IP address in a variable.

svn st | grep ^? | xargs svn add 2> /dev/null
ps -ef | grep [t]clsh
on="off"; off="on"; now=$(amixer get Master | tr -d '[]' | grep "Playback.*%" |head -n1 |awk '{print $7}'); amixer sset Master ${!now}
grep --color=auto -iRnH "$search_word" $directory
2009-02-21 19:16:33
User: tobiasboon
Functions: grep
12

greps for search word in directory and below (defaults to cd).

-i case insensitive

-n shows line number

-H shows file name

find /path/to/files -type f -mtime +7 | grep -v \.gz | xargs gzip
N="filepath" ; P=/proc/$(lsof +L1 | grep "$N" | awk '{print $2}')/fd ; ls -l $P | sed -rn "/$N/s/.*([0-9]+) ->.*/\1/p" | xargs -I_ cat $P/_ > "$N"
2009-02-21 02:31:24
User: laburu
Functions: awk cat grep ls sed xargs
5

Note that the file at the given path will have the contents of the (still) deleted file, but it is a new file with a new node number; in other words, this restores the data, but it does not actually "undelete" the old file.

I posted a function declaration encapsulating this functionality to http://www.reddit.com/r/programming/comments/7yx6f/how_to_undelete_any_open_deleted_file_in_linux/c07sqwe (please excuse the crap formatting).

for i in `ps aux | grep ssh | grep -v grep | awk {'print $2'}` ; do kill $i; done
HOST=127.0.0.1;for((port=1;port<=65535;++port)); do echo -en "$port ";if echo -en "open $HOST $port\nlogout\quit" | telnet 2>/dev/null | grep 'Connected to' > /dev/null; then echo -en "\n\nport $port/tcp is open\n\n";fi;done | grep open
ps auxwww | grep outofcontrolprocess | awk '{print $9}' | xargs kill -9
netstat -tap | grep mysql
netstat -alnp | grep ::80
find . -type d -execdir du -sh '{}' ';' | grep -E "[0-9]+K" | sed 's/^[0-9\.]\+K[\t ]\+//' | tr "\n" "\0" | xargs -0 rm -rf
grep lm /proc/cpuinfo
2009-02-19 22:48:47
User: bobbydale
Functions: grep
-2

If the 'lm' flag is present, then the CPU is 64-bit.

If no output, then CPU is 32-bit.

netstat -an | grep -i listen
2009-02-19 19:27:49
User: scubacuda
Functions: grep netstat
-2

From 'man netstat'

"netstat -i | -I interface [-abdnt] [-f address_family] [-M core] [-N system]

Show the state of all network interfaces or a single interface

which have been auto-configured (interfaces statically configured

into a system, but not located at boot time are not shown). An

asterisk (``*'') after an interface name indicates that the

interface is ``down''. If -a is also present, multicast

addresses currently in use are shown for each Ethernet interface

and for each IP interface address. Multicast addresses are shown

on separate lines following the interface address with which they

are associated. If -b is also present, show the number of bytes

in and out. If -d is also present, show the number of dropped

packets. If -t is also present, show the contents of watchdog

timers."

ps aux | grep -i firefox | grep -v grep | awk '{print $2}' | xargs -t -i kill -9 {}
2009-02-19 18:50:00
User: blackdude
Functions: awk grep kill ps xargs
-7

This is a nice way to kill processes.. the example here is for firefox!!! substitute firefox for whatever the process name is...

grep -v "^$" file
2009-02-19 18:11:58
User: hkyeakley
Functions: grep
0

To save the result, redirect the output to another file.

grep -v "^$" file1 > file2
lsof | grep "/var/spool/mail/"