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Commands using grep from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using grep - 1,637 results
N="filepath" ; P=/proc/$(lsof +L1 | grep "$N" | awk '{print $2}')/fd ; ls -l $P | sed -rn "/$N/s/.*([0-9]+) ->.*/\1/p" | xargs -I_ cat $P/_ > "$N"
2009-02-21 02:31:24
User: laburu
Functions: awk cat grep ls sed xargs

Note that the file at the given path will have the contents of the (still) deleted file, but it is a new file with a new node number; in other words, this restores the data, but it does not actually "undelete" the old file.

I posted a function declaration encapsulating this functionality to http://www.reddit.com/r/programming/comments/7yx6f/how_to_undelete_any_open_deleted_file_in_linux/c07sqwe (please excuse the crap formatting).

for i in `ps aux | grep ssh | grep -v grep | awk {'print $2'}` ; do kill $i; done
HOST=;for((port=1;port<=65535;++port)); do echo -en "$port ";if echo -en "open $HOST $port\nlogout\quit" | telnet 2>/dev/null | grep 'Connected to' > /dev/null; then echo -en "\n\nport $port/tcp is open\n\n";fi;done | grep open
ps auxwww | grep outofcontrolprocess | awk '{print $9}' | xargs kill -9
netstat -tap | grep mysql
netstat -alnp | grep ::80
find . -type d -execdir du -sh '{}' ';' | grep -E "[0-9]+K" | sed 's/^[0-9\.]\+K[\t ]\+//' | tr "\n" "\0" | xargs -0 rm -rf
grep lm /proc/cpuinfo
2009-02-19 22:48:47
User: bobbydale
Functions: grep

If the 'lm' flag is present, then the CPU is 64-bit.

If no output, then CPU is 32-bit.

netstat -an | grep -i listen
2009-02-19 19:27:49
User: scubacuda
Functions: grep netstat

From 'man netstat'

"netstat -i | -I interface [-abdnt] [-f address_family] [-M core] [-N system]

Show the state of all network interfaces or a single interface

which have been auto-configured (interfaces statically configured

into a system, but not located at boot time are not shown). An

asterisk (``*'') after an interface name indicates that the

interface is ``down''. If -a is also present, multicast

addresses currently in use are shown for each Ethernet interface

and for each IP interface address. Multicast addresses are shown

on separate lines following the interface address with which they

are associated. If -b is also present, show the number of bytes

in and out. If -d is also present, show the number of dropped

packets. If -t is also present, show the contents of watchdog


ps aux | grep -i firefox | grep -v grep | awk '{print $2}' | xargs -t -i kill -9 {}
2009-02-19 18:50:00
User: blackdude
Functions: awk grep kill ps xargs

This is a nice way to kill processes.. the example here is for firefox!!! substitute firefox for whatever the process name is...

grep -v "^$" file
2009-02-19 18:11:58
User: hkyeakley
Functions: grep

To save the result, redirect the output to another file.

grep -v "^$" file1 > file2
lsof | grep "/var/spool/mail/"
svn st | grep ^\? | awk '{print $2}' | xargs svn add
netstat -alpn | grep :80 | awk '{print $4}' |awk -F: '{print $(NF-1)}' |sort | uniq -c | sort -n
psg () { ps auxwww | egrep "$1|PID" | grep -v grep }
2009-02-18 23:37:35
User: mulad
Functions: egrep grep ps

Yet another ps grep function, but this one includes the column headings.

psg() { if [ -z "$2" ]; then psargs="aux"; greparg="$1"; else psargs="$1"; greparg="$2"; fi; ps $psargs | grep -i "$(echo $greparg | sed -e 's/^\(.\)/[\1]/')\|^$(ps $psargs | head -1)" ; }
2009-02-18 20:57:17
User: DEinspanjer
Functions: grep ps

My variant on this common function. Some highlights:

Allows you to override the default ps args of "aux"

Uses bracket trick to omit the grep process itself without having to use a second grep

Always prints the correct header row of ps output

Limitations: Ugly ps error output if you forget to quote your multi word grep argument

last | grep -v "^$" | awk '{ print $1 }' | sort -nr | uniq -c
2009-02-18 16:38:59
User: hkyeakley
Functions: awk grep last sort uniq

This command takes the output of the 'last' command, removes empty lines, gets just the first field ($USERNAME), sort the $USERNAMES in reverse order and then gives a summary count of unique matches.

grep -iR find_me ./
2009-02-18 15:38:59
User: lfamorim
Functions: grep

Searching for a String in Multiple Files With Grep

sudo dmidecode | grep Serial\ Number | head -n1
2009-02-18 14:54:28
User: nlinux
Functions: grep head sudo

This will give you the Dell Service tag number associated with your machine. Incredibly useful when you need that number for tech support or downloads.

find . | grep deleteme | while read line; do rm $line; done
2009-02-18 00:55:57
User: tec
Functions: find grep read rm

This command deletes all files in all subfolders if their name or path contains "deleteme".

To dry-run the command without actually deleting files run:

find . | grep deleteme | while read line; do echo rm $line; done
ps -ef | grep $USERNAME | awk {'print $2'} | xargs kill [-9]
2009-02-17 20:35:35
User: TheNomad
Functions: awk grep kill ps xargs

This is a 'killall' command equivalent where it is not available.

Prior to executing it, set the environment variable USERNAME to the username, whose processes you want to kill or replace the username with the $USERNAME on the command above.

Side effect: If any processes from other users, are running with a parameter of $USERNAME, they will be killed as well (assuming you are running this as root user)

[-9] in square brackets at the end of the command is optional and strongly suggested to be your last resort. I do not like to use it as the killed process leaves a lot of mess behind.

find apps/ -name "*.svn-base" -prune -o -print -name "*.php" | xargs grep -E 'new .+Form\('
2009-02-17 14:56:01
User: ubermuda
Functions: find grep xargs

finds all forms instanciated into a symfony project, pruning svn files.

ls -1 /bin | xargs -l1 whatis 2>/dev/null | grep -v "nothing appropriate"
2009-02-17 14:46:01
User: stinger
Functions: grep ls whatis xargs

Get simple description on each file from /bin dir, in list form, usefull for newbies.

grep -c -e '^cpu[0-9]\+' /proc/stat
find /directory/to/search/ -type f -print0 | xargs -0 grep "findtext"
2009-02-17 07:16:32
User: dingobytes
Functions: find grep xargs

this will find text in the directory you specify and give you line where it appears.