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Commands using grep from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using grep - 1,581 results
lsof -nP +p 24073 | grep -i listen | awk '{print $1,$2,$7,$8,$9}'
kill_daemon() { echo "Daemon?"; read dm; kill -15 $(netstat -atulpe | grep $dm | cut -d '/' -f1 | awk '{print $9}') }; alias kd='kill_daemon
2009-05-26 20:39:56
User: P17
-5

Just find out the daemon with $ netstat -atulpe. Then type in his name and he gets the SIGTERM.

cpp /usr/include/stdio.h | grep -v '^#' | grep -v '^$' | less
2009-05-22 22:40:25
User: mohan43u
Functions: cpp grep
4

will display typedefs, structs, unions and functions declared in 'stdio.h'(checkout _IO_FILE structure). It will be helpful if we want to know what a particular header file will offer to us. Command 'cpp' is GNU's C Preprocessor.

F="$HOME/.moz*/fire*/*/session*.js" ; grep -Go 'entries:\[[^]]*' $F | cut -d[ -f2 | while read A ; do echo $A | sed s/url:/\n/g | tail -1 | cut -d\" -f2; done
2009-05-21 21:58:42
User: b2e
Functions: cut echo grep read sed tail
3

Tuned for short command line - you can set the path to sessionstore.js more reliable instead of use asterixes etc.

Usable when you are not at home and really need to get your actual opened tabs on your home computer (via SSH). I am using it from my work if I forgot to bookmark some new interesting webpage, which I have visited at home. Also other way to list tabs when your firefox has crashed (restoring of tabs doesn't work always).

This script includes also tabs which has been closed short time before.

expr $(fdisk -s ` grep ' / ' /etc/mtab |cut -d " " -f1`) / 1024
curl -s checkip.dyndns.org | grep -Eo '[0-9\.]+'
2009-05-21 16:12:21
User: haivu
Functions: grep
4

The curl command retrieve the HTML text containing the IP address. The grep command picks out the IP address from that HTML text.

grep --color=always | less -R
2009-05-20 20:30:19
User: dinomite
Functions: grep less
31

Get your colorized grep output in less(1). This involves two things: forcing grep to output colors even though it's not going to a terminal and telling less to handle those properly.

netstat -ntlp | grep -w 80 | awk '{print $7}' | cut -d/ -f1
find / -iname '*.pdf' -print -exec pdftotext '{}' - \; | grep --color -i "unix"
grep -lir "some text" *
2009-05-20 19:44:35
User: decept
Functions: grep
Tags: find text
22

-l outputs only the file names

-i ignores the case

-r descends into subdirectories

find . -name "*.jar" | while read file; do echo "Processing ${file}"; jar -tvf $file | grep "Foo.class"; done
grep -ao -HP "http://[^/]*/" *
2009-05-20 14:45:34
User: binarycodes
Functions: grep
2

Replace * with any filename matching glob or an individual filename

cat -n FILE | grep -C3 "^[[:blank:]]\{1,5\}NUMBER[[:blank:]]"
2009-05-17 18:19:55
User: lv4tech
Functions: cat grep
-1

This is useful for displaying a portion of a FILE that contains an error at line NUMBER

/sbin/dumpe2fs /dev/hda2 | grep 'Block size'
2009-05-15 22:23:21
User: rez0r
Functions: grep
Tags: size output block
0

Useful to know, especially if you are dealing with output configurations in block size.

Tested on 'Red Hat'.

svn log | grep "bodge\|fudge\|hack\|dirty"
2009-05-15 09:55:44
User: root
Functions: grep
-4

A good way to understand what you've let yourself in for. Potential project metric could be the count:

svn log | grep -c "bodge\|fudge\|hack\|dirty"
svn st | grep '^\?' | awk '{print $2}' | xargs svn add; svn st | grep '^\!' | awk '{print $2}' | xargs svn rm
2009-05-14 14:34:50
User: stedwick
Functions: awk grep xargs
0

automatically add and remove files in subversion so that you don't have to do it through the annoying svn commands anymore

curl -s http://checkip.dyndns.org/ | grep -o "[[:digit:].]\+"
grep -i '<searchTerm>\|<someOtherSearchTerm>' <someFileName>
2009-05-11 23:05:54
User: scifisamurai
Functions: grep
-1

This is a simple but useful command to search for multiple terms in a file at once. This prevents you from having to do mutliple grep's of the same file.

echo 2006-10-10 | grep -c '^[0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9]-[0-9][0-9]-[0-9][0-9]$'
2009-05-11 22:18:43
User: rez0r
Functions: echo grep
-1

Quick and easy way of validating a date format of yyyy-mm-dd and returning a boolean, the regex can easily be upgraded to handle "in betweens" for mm dd or to validate other types of strings, ex. ip address.

Boolean output could easily be piped into a condition for a more complete one-liner.

curl -s http://bash.org/?random1|grep -oE "<p class=\"quote\">.*</p>.*</p>"|grep -oE "<p class=\"qt.*?</p>"|sed -e 's/<\/p>/\n/g' -e 's/<p class=\"qt\">//g' -e 's/<p class=\"qt\">//g'|perl -ne 'use HTML::Entities;print decode_entities($_),"\n"'|head -1
2009-05-07 13:13:21
User: Iftah
Functions: grep head perl sed
7

bash.org is a collection of funny quotes from IRC.

WARNING: some of the quotes contain "adult" jokes... may be embarrassing if your boss sees them...

Thanks to Chen for the idea and initial version!

This script downloads a page with random quotes, filters the html to retrieve just one liners quotes and outputs the first one.

Just barely under the required 255 chars :)

Improvment:

You can replace the head -1 at the end by:

awk 'length($0)>0 {printf( $0 "\n%%\n" )}' > bash_quotes.txt

which will separate the quotes with a "%" and place it in the file.

and then:

strfile bash_quotes.txt

which will make the file ready for the fortune command

and then you can:

fortune bash_quotes.txt

which will give you a random quote from those in the downloaded file.

I download a file periodically and then use the fortune in .bashrc so I see a funny quote every time I open a terminal.

for i in *jpg; do jpeginfo -c $i | grep -E "WARNING|ERROR" | cut -d " " -f 1 | xargs -I '{}' find /mnt/sourcerep -name {} -type f -print0 | xargs -0 -I '{}' cp -f {} ./ ; done
2009-05-07 00:30:36
User: vincentp
Functions: cp cut find grep xargs
0

Find all corrupted jpeg in the current directory, find a file with the same name in a source directory hierarchy and copy it over the corrupted jpeg file.

Convenient to run on a large bunch of jpeg files copied from an unsure medium.

Needs the jpeginfo tool, found in the jpeginfo package (on debian at least).

lsof -i | grep -i estab
find . -name "*.[ch]" -exec grep -i -H "search pharse" {} \;
2009-05-06 15:22:49
User: bunedoggle
Functions: find grep
Tags: find grep
33

I have a bash alias for this command line and find it useful for searching C code for error messages.

The -H tells grep to print the filename. you can omit the -i to match the case exactly or keep the -i for case-insensitive matching.

This find command find all .c and .h files

awk -F\" '{print $4}' *.log | grep -v "eviljaymz\|\-" | sort | uniq -c | awk -F\ '{ if($1>500) print $1,$2;}' | sort -n
2009-05-05 22:21:04
User: jaymzcd
Functions: awk grep sort uniq
1

This prints a summary of your referers from your logs as long as they occurred a certain number of times (in this case 500). The grep command excludes the terms, I add this in to remove results Im not interested in.

lynx -dump randomfunfacts.com | grep -A 3 U | sed 1D
2009-05-05 07:52:10
User: xizdaqrian
Functions: grep sed
0

This is a working version, though probably clumsy, of the script submitted by felix001. This works on ubuntu and CygWin. This would be great as a bash function, defined in .bashrc. Additionally it would work as a script put in the path.