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Commands using grep from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using grep - 1,632 results
dmesg | grep -Po 'csum failed ino\S* \d+' | sort | uniq | xargs -n 3 find / -inum 2> /dev/null
2014-03-20 06:27:15
User: Sepero
Functions: dmesg find grep sort uniq xargs
Tags: find inode btrfs

Btrfs reports the inode numbers of files with failed checksums. Use `find` to lookup the file names of those inodes.

psql -h <SERVER NAME HERE> -c 'SELECT version();' | grep -v 'version\|---\|row\|^ *$' | sed 's/^\s*//'
2014-03-17 18:36:40
User: pnelsonsr
Functions: grep sed

In a multiple PostgreSQL server environment knowing the servers version can be important. Note that psql --version returns just the local psql apps version which may not be what you want. This command dumps the PostgreSQL servers version out to one line. You may need to add more command line options to the psql command for your connection environment.

for i in `sudo /sbin/fdisk -l |grep Disk |grep dev |awk '{ print $2 }' |sed s/://g` ; do sudo /usr/bin/dd if=/dev/urandom of=$i bs=8M & done
2014-03-16 12:04:59
User: aimana007
Functions: awk grep sed sudo
Tags: bash Linux

This command will use the fdisk utility to find all block devices on your system, and overwrite them with data from the /dev/urandom non-blocking random number generator.

CAUTION: This will irrevocably erase EVERY SINGLE physical block storage device visible to the fdisk utility, including plugged USB devices, RAID sets, LVM, etc.

wmic OS get OSArchitecture /value | grep -Eo '[^=]*$'
2014-03-15 02:04:08
User: lowjax
Functions: get grep

Using "wmic get * /value" within any Cygwin shell will return lots of Win/Dos newline junk ie "^M$" at the end of found value line, two lines ("$" Unix newline) above, and three below. This makes storing and or evaluating wmic queries as variables a pain. The method i suggest strips the mentioned junk, only returns the value after "OSArchitecture=", and includes only one Unix style newline. Other methods using sed|awk|cut can only handle the output of wmic cleanly when piped or using multiple sed statements.

wmic OS get OSArchitecture /value | sed 's/\r//g;s/^M$//;/^$/d;s/.*=//'


wmic OS get OSArchitecture /value | grep -Eo '[^=]*$'

a much cleaner and slightly less costly alternative.

ls | grep ".txt$" | xargs -i WHATEVER_COMMAND {}
/usr/bin/lynx -dump -width 500 | grep GET | awk '{print $12 $14}' | sort | uniq -c | sort -rn | head
2014-03-12 13:24:40
User: copocaneta
Functions: awk grep sort uniq

List the busiest scripts/files running on a cPanel server with domain showing (column $12).

netstat -tn 2>/dev/null | grep ':80 ' | awk '{print $5}' |sed -e 's/::ffff://' | cut -f1 -d: | sort | uniq -c | sort -rn | head
2014-03-12 12:43:07
User: copocaneta
Functions: awk cut grep netstat sed sort uniq

IP addresses and number of connections connected to port 80.

/usr/bin/lynx -dump -width 500 | grep GET | awk '{print $12}' | sort | uniq -c | sort -rn | head
2014-03-12 12:31:34
User: copocaneta
Functions: awk grep sort uniq

Easiest way to obtain the busiest website list (sorted by number of process running).

lsof | grep -i deleted | grep REG | grep -v txt | ruby -r 'pp' -e 'STDIN.each do |v| a = v.split(/ +/); puts `:> /proc/#{a[1]}/fd/#{a[3].chop}`; end'
2014-03-11 06:02:09
User: jim80net
Functions: grep

Be careful, first run:

lsof | grep -i deleted | grep REG | grep -v txt

Then, give it the boot!

grep -r --include=*.php "something" /foo/bar
2014-03-07 13:26:12
User: avpod2
Functions: grep

Actually grep can do recursive search based on file extensions.

grep -o -P '[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\:[0-9]{1,5}\s->\s{5}[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\:[0-9]{1,5}' <capture file> | tr -d ' ' | sed 's/:.....//g' | sort -n | uniq -c | sort -nr
2014-03-05 21:34:42
User: santizo
Functions: grep sed sort tr uniq

Sort netflow packet capture by unique connections excluding source port.

lspci -vv | grep 'Ethernet\|Serial' | awk 'NR == 1{ printf $1 } NR == 2 { print " mac " $7 }' | sed ?e 's/-/:/g' -e 's/:f[ef]:f[ef]//g' -e 's/01:00.0/eth0/g' -e 's/01:00.1/eth1/g' -e 's/01:00.2/eth2/g' -e 's/01:00.3/eth3/g' > /etc/iftab && ifrename
2014-03-01 20:07:18
Functions: awk grep lspci printf sed

for redhat systems works sometimes :S tested on dell poweredge r7+ systems

cat /proc/cpuinfo | grep BogoMIPS | uniq | sed 's/^.*://g' | awk '{print($1 / 4) }'
locate *\\.php|xargs grep --color=always -i -5 "namespace\s.*\W"|less
2014-02-28 13:52:15
Functions: grep locate xargs

Another way to view some code by keyword and basic regular expression

arecord -q -f cd -d 1 recvol.wav;sox recvol.wav -n stat 2>&1|grep RMS|grep amplitude|cut -d"." -f2|cut -c 1-2>recvol;echo $((`cat recvol`+1))>recvol;rec -t wav - silence 1 0.1 `cat recvol` -1 1.0 `cat recvol`%|lame -s 44.1 -a -v - >record.mp3
2014-02-27 23:23:55
User: geaplanet
Functions: arecord cd cut echo grep stat

It find out the mic recording level at the moment of run the command and if a noise level is higher it starts to record an mp3 file. The resulting file will have only the sounds not the silences.

eval $(history | cut -c 8- | grep "adb connect [0-9]" | tail -1)
2014-02-27 14:44:27
User: CanOrhan
Functions: cut eval grep tail

Connects to the last adb connection in history.

ps -eo pmem,comm | grep application-name
2014-02-23 13:21:29
User: Darkstar
Functions: grep ps

Displays memory usage for individual instances of an application that spawns multiple instances of itself. This command also works on single process applications.

sudo lsof -i -n -P | grep TCP
udevadm info -q all -n /dev/sdb | grep ID_PATH | cut -d'-' -f 2 | xargs -n 1 lspci -s
echo "Memory:" $(dmidecode --type memory | grep " MB" | awk '{sum += $2; a=sum/1024} END {print a}') "GB"
find . -exec grep -Hn what \{\} \; | less
2014-02-17 09:59:01
User: ynedelchev
Functions: find grep what

This command will traverse all of the folders and subfolders under current working directory. For every file inside it, it will do a search inside the content of the file for a specific term 'what'. Then it will print a list of the lines that contain that term (and match that pattern). Each matching line will be preceded with the path and name to the file and then the line number iside taht file wehre the pattern was found. Then the actual content of the matching lien will be printed.

The output will be piped throug less, so that the user can scroll through it if it goes beyond the limits of the current display window.

find . -name *.properties -exec /bin/echo {} \; -exec cat {} \; | grep -E 'listen|properties'
YYYY=2014; MM=02; for d in $(cal $MM $YYYY | grep "^ *[0-9]"); do DD=$(printf "%02d" $d); echo $YYYY$MM$DD; done
2014-02-06 11:31:57
User: fibo
Functions: cal echo grep printf
Tags: cal for loop

Edit YYYY and MM at the beginning of the command with the year and month you want.

Note that `DD=$(printf "%02d" $d)` will pad single digit integers with a leading zero.

Substitute `echo $YYYY$MM$DD` at the end of the line with the command you want to launch, for instance

script.pl --yyyymmdd $YYYY$MM$DD

lsblk | grep <mountpoint>
npm ls -g|grep "^[&#9500;&#9492;]\(.\+\)\?[&#9516;&#9472;] "