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Functions

Commands using ls from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using ls - 467 results
while :;do if [ ! $(ls -l commander |cut -d ' ' -f5) -eq 0 ]; then echo "Ran command: $(less commander) @ $(date +%D) $(date +%r)" >> comm_log;"$(less commander)";> commander;fi;done
2010-06-15 01:20:27
User: evil
Functions: cut echo ls
0

This is a simple solution to running a remote program on a remote computer on the remote display through ssh.

1. Create an empty 'commander' file in the directory where you intend on running these commands.

2. Run the command

3. Hop on another computer and ssh in to the PC where you ran the command

4. cd to the directory where the 'commander' file is.

5. Test it by doing the following: echo "xeyes" > commander

6. If it worked properly, then xeyes will popup on the remote computer.

Combined with my other one liner, you can place those in some start-up scripts and be able to screw with your wife/daughter/siblings, w/e by either launching programs or sending notifications(my other one liner).

Also, creates a log file named comm_log in working directory that logs all commands ran.

while : ; do if [ ! $(ls -l commander | cut -d ' ' -f5) -eq 0 ]; then notify-send "$(less commander)"; > commander; fi; done
2010-06-13 18:45:02
User: evil
Functions: cut ls
2

Run this command when you are physically at the computer you wish to send pop-up messages to. Then when you ssh in to it, you can do this: echo "guess who?" > commander

guess who? will then pop up on the screen for a few moments, then disappear. You will need to create the commander file first. I mess with my wife all the time with this. i.e. echo "You have given the computer a virus. Computer will be rendered useless in 10 seconds." > commander

lol

find directory -maxdepth 1 -type f | xargs ls -l | awk 'BEGIN { SUM=0} { SUM+=$5 } END { print SUM/2^20 }'
ls -l directory | awk 'BEGIN { SUM=0 } { SUM+=$5 } END { print SUM/1024/1024"M" }'
find / -type f -size +500000k -exec ls -lh {} \; | awk '{ print $9 ": " $5 }'
find . -type f -exec ls -s \{\} \; | sort -n
2010-06-02 11:03:31
User: Insti
Functions: find ls sort
-2

Finds all files below the current directory.

Orders the result from smallest to largest.

Good for finding the largest files in the tree.

find . -type f | xargs ls -ltrhg
2010-05-28 01:23:53
User: emacs
Functions: find ls xargs
-1

find and normal files and list them sorting with modification time without group

l: with detailed information

t: sort with modification time

r: reverse order

h: show file's size in human-readable format, such as K(kilobytes), M(megabyes) etc.

g: do not show group

ls -rl --time-style=+%s * | sed '/^$/,/^total [0-9]*$/d' | sort -nk6
find . -type f -mtime -14 -exec ls -ltd \{\} \; | less
find . -type f -exec ls -tr {} +
2010-05-27 14:52:28
Functions: find ls
-2

List all files from the current directory and subdirectories, sorted by modification time, oldest first.

ls -lt | more
2010-05-27 12:44:39
User: eludom
Functions: ls
3

Simple but useful; list files in the current directory in mtime order. Useful if you've been working on something and then take a day or two off.

rm-but() { ls -Q | grep -v "$1" | xargs rm -r ; }
2010-05-13 09:28:56
User: sata
Functions: grep ls rm xargs
0
rm-but() { ls -Q | grep -v "$1" | xargs rm -r ; }

Add this to your .bashrc file.

Then whenever you need to remove all files/directories but one from present working directory. Run:

rm-but <important-file-or-directory>

Notes:

1. This doesn't affect the hidden files.

2. Argument is actually as string. And all files/directories having this string in there name are left untouched.

find / -type f -size +512000 | xargs ls -lh | awk '{ print $5 " " $6$7 ": " $9 }'
2010-05-12 17:21:12
User: johnss
Functions: awk find ls xargs
0

This is an updated version that some one provided me via another "find" command to find files over a certain size. Keep in mind you may have to mess around with the print values depending on your system to get the correct output you want. This was tested on FC and Cent based servers. (thanks to berta for the update)

s3cmd ls s3://bucket.example.com | s3cmd del `awk '{print $4}'`
ls | grep *.txt | while read file; do cat $file >> ./output.txt; done;
goyoutube() { d=/path/to/videos p=$d/playlist m=$d/*.mp4 f=$d/*.flv if [ "$1" == 'rand' ]; then ls -1 $m $f | shuf >$p else ls -1t $m $f >$p fi mplayer -geometry 500x400 -playlist $p }
2010-04-11 18:53:49
User: meathive
Functions: ls
-1

newly downloaded videos

goyoutube

random

goyoutube rand

This command assumes you've already downloaded some YouTube .mp4 or .flv video files via other means. Requires 'shuf', or your own stdin shuffler.

ls -lS
open-command $(ls -rt *.type | tail -n 1)
2010-04-04 20:43:38
User: RBerenguel
Functions: ls tail
0

Change open-command and type to suit your needs. One example would be to open the last .jpg file with Eye Of Gnome:

eog $(ls -rt *.jpg | tail -n 1)

function wherepath () { for DIR in `echo $PATH | tr ":" "\n" | awk '!x[$0]++ {print $0}'`; do ls ${DIR}/$1 2>/dev/null; done }
2010-04-02 20:32:36
User: mscar
Functions: awk ls tr
Tags: find locate PATH
0

The wherepath function will search all the directories in your PATH and print a unique list of locations in the order they are first found in the PATH. (PATH often has redundant entries.) It will automatically use your 'ls' alias if you have one or you can hardcode your favorite 'ls' options in the function to get a long listing or color output for example.

Alternatives:

'whereis' only searches certain fixed locations.

'which -a' searches all the directories in your path but prints duplicates.

'locate' is great but isn't installed everywhere (and it's often too verbose).

ls | egrep -v "[REGULAR EXPRESSION]" | xargs rm -v
2010-04-01 02:40:40
User: Saxphile
Functions: egrep ls rm xargs
Tags: files rm
-1

This is a slight variation of an existing submission, but uses regular expression to look for files instead. This makes it vastly more versatile, and one can easily verify the files to be kept by running ls | egrep "[REGULAR EXPRESSION]"

find . -type f -iname '*.msh' -exec ls -lG {} \; | awk '{total = total + $4}END{print "scale=2;" total "/2^20"}' | bc
ls | while read filename; do tar -czvf "$filename".tar.gz "$filename"; rm "$filename"; done
2010-03-29 08:10:38
User: Thingymebob
Functions: ls read rm tar
-2

Compresses each file individually, creating a $fileneame.tar.gz and removes the uncompressed version, usefull if you have lots of files and don't want 1 huge archive containing them all. you could replace ls with ls *.pdf to just perform the action on pdfs for example.

ls -d $(echo ${PATH//:/ }) > /dev/null
ls -l | grep ^-
ls -l | awk '{if (NR % 5 == 0) print "-- COMMIT --"; print}'