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Commands using mv from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using mv - 180 results
find . -name "-help" -exec mv {} help.txt \;
find . -maxdepth 2 -name "*somepattern" -print0 | xargs -0 -I "{}" echo mv "{}" /destination/path
2009-08-01 01:55:47
User: jonasrullo
Functions: echo find mv xargs
3

Only tested on Linux Ubunty Hardy. Works when file names have spaces. The "-maxdepth 2" limits the find search to the current directory and the next one deeper in this example. This was faster on my system because find was searching every directory before the current directory without the -maxdepth option. Almost as fast as locate when used as above. Must use double quotes around pattern to handle spaces in file names. -print0 is used in combination with xargs -0. Those are zeros not "O"s. For xargs, -I is used to replace the following "{}" with the incoming file-list items from find. Echo just prints to the command line what is happening with mv. mv needs "{}" again so it knows what you are moving from. Then end with the move destination. Some other versions may only require one "{}" in the move command and not after the -I, however this is what worked for me on Ubuntu 8.04. Some like to use -type f in the find command to limit the type.

md5sum * | sed 's/^\(\w*\)\s*\(.*\)/\2 \1/' | while read LINE; do mv $LINE; done
buffer () { tty -s && return; tmp=$(mktemp); cat > "${tmp}"; if [ -n "$1" ] && ( ( [ -f "$1" ] && [ -w "$1" ] ) || ( ! [ -a "$1" ] && [ -w "$(dirname "$1")" ] ) ); then mv -f "${tmp}" "$1"; else echo "Can't write in \"$1\""; rm -f "${tmp}"; fi }
2009-07-27 20:21:15
User: Josay
Functions: cat echo mv rm tty
Tags: redirection
2

A common mistake in Bash is to write command-line where there's command a reading a file and whose result is redirected to that file.

It can be easily avoided because of :

1) warnings "-bash: file.txt: cannot overwrite existing file"

2) options (often "-i") that let the command directly modify the file

but I like to have that small function that does the trick by waiting for the first command to end before trying to write into the file.

Lots of things could probably done in a better way, if you know one...

Keys=$HOME/.ssh/authorized_keys;Back=$Keys.tmp.bak;Time=${1:-15};cp $Keys $Back;cat /dev/stdin >>$Keys;echo mv $Back $Keys|at now+${Time}minutes;
2009-07-15 23:45:02
User: 5z474n
Functions: at mv
1

If you frequently need to connect to your ubersecure mainframe from various uberunsafe machines, you have to face difficult decision: (a) type the password everytime during the session (lame), (b) add local public key to mainframes authorized_keys file (unsafe), (c) as above, but remove this key at the end of the session (pain in the a55). So let's say you save The Command to tempauth file in bin directory of your mainframe's account and make it executable. Then, while you're on one of these unsafe ones, do:

cat $HOME/.ssh/id_rsa.pub|ssh 5z474n@mainframe.nl bin/tempauth 30

and password prompts stop the harassment for 30 minutes and you don't have to care to remove the unsafe key after that.

for f in *; do mv $f <target_path>; done;
2009-07-09 12:07:49
User: fritz_monroe
Functions: mv
-5

In my job I often have to deal with moving 100,000 files or more. A mv won't do it because there are too many. This will move everything in the current directory to the target path.

for f in $(find * -maxdepth 0 -type f); do file=$(find ~/target -name $f); if [ -n "$file" ]; then cp $file ${file}.bak; mv $f $file; fi; done
2009-07-08 10:18:06
User: sanmiguel
Functions: cp find mv
0

You could start this one with

for f in *; do

BUT using the find with "-type f" ensures you only get files not any dirs you might have

It'll also create backups of the files it's overwriting

Of course, this assumes that you don't have any files with duplicated filenames in your target structure

for i in *;do mv "$i" "$(echo $i | sed s/PROBLEM/FIX/g)";done
2009-06-28 01:50:25
User: AlecSchueler
Functions: mv
3

Useful if non-ascii characters in filenames have been improperly encoded. Replace "PROBLEM" with the incorrect characters (e.g. 'é'), and "FIX" with the correct ones (e.g. '?').

season=1; for file in $(ls) ; do dir=$(echo $file | sed 's/.*S0$season\(E[0-9]\{2\}\).*/\1/'); mkdir $dir ; mv $file $dir; done
2009-05-27 03:30:58
User: lonecat
Functions: echo file mkdir mv sed
-1

It happened to me that I got a season of a tv-show which had all files under the same folder like /home/blah/tv_show/season1/file{1,2,3,4,5,...}.avi

But I like to have them like this:

/home/blah/tv_show/season1/e{1,2,3,4,5,...}/file{1,2,3,4,5,...}.avi

So I can have both the srt and the avi on one folder without cluttering much. This command organizes everything assuming that the filename contains Exx where xx is the number of the episode.

You may need to set:

IFS=$'\n'

if your filenames have spaces.

mv $1 $2 && ln -s $2/$(basename $1) $(dirname $1)
for files in $(ls -A directory_name); do sed 's/search/replaced/g' $files > $files.new && mv $files.new $files; done;
2009-05-07 20:13:07
User: bassu
Functions: ls mv sed
-3

Yeah, there are many ways to do that.

Doing with sed by using a for loop is my favourite, because these are two basic things in all *nix environments. Sed by default does not allow to save the output in the same files so we'll use mv to do that in batch along with the sed.

for i in `ls *xml`; do sed -e 's,oldpassword,newpassword,g' $i > $i.2 && mv -f $i.2 $i ; done
i=10;for o in *.mp3; do i=$(printf "%02d" $i); mv $o $i$o; ((i = $i + 2)); done
2009-04-13 12:33:52
User: bazzawill
Functions: mv printf
-1

This command adds the numbers 10, 12, 14 to a bunch of mp3's in the current working directory. You can then run the command replacing the inital i=10 with i=11 to add 11,13,15 in another directory then mv the files together and the first files interweave with the second group of files. I used this to weave a backlog of a podcast with other podcast so I didn't get sick of one while I was catching up. I started at 10 because printf blows up with 0 padded numbers 08 and 09 which kind of makes the printf command redundant as it was used to pad numbers 1 - 9 so they would come first and not get sorted incorrectly

find ~ -mtime +365 -exec mv {} /tmp/mybackup \;
2009-04-11 12:16:48
User: kayowas
Functions: find mv
-5

This example uses the -exec option to move all matching files into a backup directory

for f in * ; do mv -- "$f" "${f/[0-9][0-9] \- /}" ; done
2009-04-10 11:06:13
Functions: mv
-4

I have often file like this

01 - file.file

02 - file.file

03 - file.file

I rename all with this command

for f in * ; do mv -- "$f" "${f/[0-9][0-9] \- /}" ; done

then it looks like this

file.file

file.file

file.file

etc

for file in $(find -type f -iname "*wav"); do mv $file "$file"_orig.WAV; mplayer -ao pcm "$file"_orig.WAV -ao pcm:file=$file; done
mv `find .zip ./` .
2009-03-27 04:42:48
User: smcpherson
Functions: mv
Tags: find
-8

This is useful if you have a collection of files in folders (for example, a bunch of .zip files that are contained in folders) and you want to move them all to a common folder.

find -depth . | (while read FULLPATH; do BASENAME=`basename "${FULLPATH}"`; DIRNAME=`dirname "${FULLPATH}"`; mv "${DIRNAME}/${BASENAME}" "${DIRNAME}/${BASENAME// /_}"; done)
2009-03-24 21:04:32
User: mohan43u
Functions: find mv read
-9

Takes filenames and directory names and replace space to '_'.

$mkdir mydir -> mv !$ yourdir -> $cd !$
for x in *s.yml; do mv $x `echo $x | sed 's/s\.yml/\.yml/'`; done
2009-03-10 17:51:19
Functions: mv sed
-1

Jan Nelson from Grockit came up with this for us when we needed to rename all of our fixtures.

mv file_name.extension ..
2009-03-09 15:35:58
User: takealeft
Functions: mv
-3

cd into the directory that contains the file.

this is just the usual move command but shortcut'd.

say you wanted to move a photo img1.png from ~/photos/holidayphotos into the parent directory which is ~/photos

command would be:

~/photos/holidayphotos$ mv img1.png ..

I use Ubuntu so this'll work in debian but not sure what else.

for i in *.html ; do mv $i ${i%.html}.htm ; done
mv filename.{old,new}
ls -1 | while read a; do mv "$a" `echo $a | sed -e 's/\ /\./g'`; done
alias wordpress='mkdir wordpress && cd wordpress && wget http://wordpress.org/latest.tar.gz && tar -xvzf latest.tar.gz && mv wordpress/* . && rm -rf latest.tar.gz wordpress && cp wp-config-sample.php wp-config.php'