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Commands using perl from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using perl - 345 results
find . -iname "*.cpp" -exec perl -ni -e 'chomp; print "$_\n"' {} \;
2009-02-18 14:12:24
User: grundprinzip
Functions: find perl

Adds a newline to the end of all cpp files in the directory to avoid warnings from gcc compiler.

perl -pe 's/\d+/++$n/e' file.txt
perl -pi -e 's:^V^M::g' <filenames>
2009-02-16 21:17:40
User: starchox
Functions: perl

That "^M" is Ctrl-M, which is a carriage return, and is not needed in Unix file systems.

Where ^V is actually Ctrl-V and ^M is actually Ctrl-M (you must type these yourself, don't just copy and paste this command). ^V will not be displayed on your screen.

find . -type f -exec grep -l XXX {} \;|tee /tmp/fileschanged|xargs perl -pi.bak -e 's/XXX/YYY/g'
2009-02-16 02:55:23
User: drossman
Functions: find grep perl tee xargs

Find all files that contain string XXX in them, change the string from XXX to YYY, make a backup copy of the file and save a list of files changed in /tmp/fileschanged.

cat file.php | perl -p -e 's/(\$|->)(str|arr|obj|int|flt|boo|bool|mix|res)([A-Z])/$1\L$3/g'
2009-02-10 14:37:12
User: root
Functions: cat perl

This removes the type prefix used in Hungarian notation (v. bad) for PHP variables. Eg. variables of the form $intDays, $fltPrice, $arrItems, $objLogger convert to $days, $price, $Items, $logger.

perl -e "''=~('(?{'.('-^@.]|(;,@/{}/),[\\\$['^'],)@)[\`^@,@[*@[@?}.|').'})')"
find . -name "*.jpg" | perl -ne'chomp; $name = $_; $quote = chr(39); s/[$quote\\!]/_/ ; print "mv \"$name\" \"$_\"\n"'
perl -e "use SOAP::Lite"
2009-02-06 15:26:37
User: leprasmurf
Functions: perl

Quick command to check if Perl library is installed on your server.

perl -pe 's/.+;//' ~/.zsh_history | sort | uniq -c | sort -r|head -10
perl -le 'print join ", ", map { chomp; $_ } <>'
2009-02-06 12:50:43
User: jozef
Functions: join perl

joins multiple lines to create single line with comma separated values. for example if we have an email addresses one per line (copy&paste from spreadsheet) it will oputput one line with comman separated addresses to put it to email client.

perl -MHTML::Entities -ne 'print encode_entities($_)' /tmp/subor.txt
2009-02-06 12:44:24
User: jozef
Functions: perl

Encodes HTML entities from input (file or stdin) so it's possible to directly past the result to a blog or HTML source file.

grep -r -l xxxxx . | xargs perl -i -pe "s/xxxxx/yyyyy/g"
2009-02-06 08:18:50
User: hassylin
Functions: grep perl xargs

This script first find all files which contains word xxxxx recursively. Then replace the word xxxxx to yyyyy of the files.

Use case:

- Web site domain change

- Function name change of the program

find . -name "*.txt" | xargs perl -pi -e 's/old/new/g'
2009-02-06 00:28:03
User: neztach
Functions: find perl xargs

syntax follows regular command line expression.

example: let's say you have a directory (with subdirs) that has say 4000 .php files.

All of these files were made via script, but uh-oh, there was a typo!

if the typo is "let's go jome!" but you meant it to say "let's go home!"

find . -name "*.php" | xargs perl -pi -e "s/let\'s\ go\ jome\!/let\'s\ go\ home\!/g"

all better :)

multiline: find . -name "*.php" | xargs perl -p0777i -e 's/knownline1\nknownline2/replaced/m'

indescriminate line replace: find ./ -name '*.php' | xargs perl -pi -e 's/\".*$\"/\new\ line\ content/g'

perl -pi -e 's/THIS/THAT/g' fileglob*
2009-02-05 19:19:52
User: elofland
Functions: perl

changes THIS to THAT in all files matching fileglob* without using secondary files

perl -e '$b="bork"; while(<STDIN>){$l=`$_ 2>&1`; $l=~s/[A-Za-z]+/$b/g; print "$l$b\@$b:\$ ";}'
2009-02-05 18:33:40
User: fonik
Functions: perl

Bork, bork, bork!

To keep it short, the first terminal line doesn't show a prompt.

perl -pi -e 's/localhost/replacementhost/g' *.php
perl -i -pe "s/old/new/g" *
2009-02-05 12:07:27
User: pandres
Functions: perl

Replaces every ocurrence of 'old' for 'new' in all files specified. After the 'i' char you can put a '~' or whatever to create a backup file for each replaced with the name equal to the original plus character.

function sshdel { perl -i -n -e "print unless (\$. == $1)" ~/.ssh/known_hosts; }
2009-02-03 16:20:50
User: xsawyerx
Functions: perl

sometimes you got conflicts using SSH (host changing ip, ip now belongs to a different machine) and you need to edit the file and remove the offending line from known_hosts. this does it much easier.

perl -pi.bk -e's/foo/bar/g' file1 file2 fileN
2009-01-29 09:51:11
User: xsawyerx
Functions: perl

the addition of ".bk" to the regular "pie" idiom makes perl create a backup of every file with the extension ".bk", in case it b0rks something and you want it back

perl -pi -e's/foo/bar/g' file1 file2 fileN
2009-01-29 09:47:01
User: xsawyerx
Functions: perl

The "g" at the end is for global, meaning replace all occurrences and not just the first one.