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Commands using perl from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using perl - 344 results
for i in `screen -ls | perl -ne'if(/^\s+\d+\.([^\s]+)/){print $1, " "}'`; do gnome-terminal -e "screen -x $i"; done
2009-04-25 22:39:24
User: hank
Functions: perl
Tags: screen Linux perl
2

There was another line that was dependent on having un-named screen sessions. This just wouldn't do. This one works no matter what the name is. A possible improvement would be removing the perl dependence, but that doesn't effect me.

ldapsearch -v -H ldap://<server> -x -D cn=<johndoe>,cn=<users>,dc=<ourdomain>,dc=<tld> -w<secret> -b ou=<lazystaff>,dc=<ourdomain>,dc=<tld> -s sub sAMAccountName=* '*' | perl -pne 's/(\d{11})\d{7}/"DATE-AD(".scalar(localtime($1-11644473600)).")"/e'
2009-04-22 00:57:34
User: flux
Functions: perl
4

When Ldapsearch queries an Active directory server, all the dates are shown using a timestamp of 18 digits. This perl regexp decodes them in a more human friendly notation. 11644473600 corresponds to some microsoft epoch.

cat <filename> | perl -e '$/ = ""; $_ = <>; s/<!--.*?-->//gs; print;'
2009-04-15 20:29:11
User: unixx
Functions: cat perl
0

xml with verbose commenting can be difficult to read. remove comments from xml.

$ perl -pi -e 's/\r\n/\n/g' <finelame>
2009-04-10 22:22:31
Functions: perl
Tags: perl dos2unix
0

Converts windows lined-style file to unix.

see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Newline

Can be used to convert from linux2dos : just invert \r\n and \n.

u=`curl -d 'dl.start=Free' $(curl $1|perl -wpi -e 's/^.*"(http:\/\/rs.*)" method.*$/$1/'|egrep '^http'|head -n1)|grep "Level(3) \#2"|perl -wpi -e 's/^.*(http:\/\/rs[^\\\\]*).*$/$1/'`;sleep 60;wget $u
perl -ne 'while (/([0-9]+\.){3}[0-9]+/g) {print "$&\n"};' file.txt
watch -tn1 'bc<<<"`date -d'\''friday 21:00'\'' +%s`-`date +%s`"|perl -ne'\''@p=gmtime($_);printf("%dd %02d:%02d:%02d\n",@p[7,2,1,0]);'\'
2009-03-29 19:53:36
User: penpen
Functions: perl watch
Tags: Linux unix date
-2

An improved version of http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/1772/simple-countdown-from-a-given-date that uses Perl to pretty-print the output. Note that the GNU-style '--no-title' option has been replaced by its one-letter counterpart '-t'.

perl -pi -e 's/foo/bar/g' $(grep -rl foo ./*)
2009-03-27 17:21:35
User: dopeman
Functions: grep perl
Tags: perl
-1

This command will replace all instances of 'foo' with 'bar' in all files in the current working directory and any sub-directories.

perl -pi -e 's/foo/bar/g' $(grep -l foo ./*)
2009-03-27 17:18:08
User: dopeman
Functions: grep perl
-1

This command will replace all instances of 'foo' with 'bar' in all files in the current working directory.

function crtonl { perl -i -ape 's/\r\n?/\n/g;' $* ; }
2009-03-25 20:28:32
User: totoro
Functions: perl
Tags: files
-2

Many Mac OS X programs, especially those in Microsoft:Office, create ASCII files with lines terminated by CRs (carriage returns). Most Unix programs expect lines separated by NLs (newlines). This little command makes it trivial to convert them.

perl -e 'print scalar localtime $ARGV[0],"\n" ' epoch
du -hS / | perl -ne '(m/\d{3,}M\s+\S/ || m/G\s+\S/) && print'
2009-03-25 18:06:53
User: Alioth
Functions: du perl
6

Finds all directories containing more than 99MB of files, and prints them in human readable format. The directories sizes do not include their subdirectories, so it is very useful for finding any single directory with a lot of large files.

perl -e 'print "Hello World!", "\n";'
history | perl -lane '$lsize{$_} = scalar(@F); if($longest<$lsize{$_}) { $longest = $lsize{$_}; print "$_"; };' | tail -n1
perl -e 'print map { $_ . "\n" } @INC;'
perl -0777 -ne 'print "$1\n" while /word-a(.*?)word-b/gs' filename.txt
2009-03-08 11:47:18
User: eleffie
Functions: perl
3

This command will display all lines between 2 patterns: word-a and word-b

useful for grepping command outputs from file

find $HOME -type f -print | perl -wnlaF'/' -e 'BEGIN{ print "#EXTM3U"; } /.+\.wmv$|.+\.mpg$|.+\.vob$/i and print "#EXTINF:$F[-1]\nfile://$&";' > movies.m3u
perl -pi -e's/<what to find>/<what to replace it with>/g' `grep -Rl <what to find> /<dir>/*`
2009-02-26 19:14:39
User: adampbell
Functions: perl
2

Finds the string in every file in an entire directory and all its subdirectories and replaces it with a new string. Especially useful when changing a machine's IP address or hostname - run it on /etc.

find . -type d | perl -nle 'print s,/,/,g," $_"' | sort -n | tail
du -b --max-depth 1 | sort -nr | perl -pe 's{([0-9]+)}{sprintf "%.1f%s", $1>=2**30? ($1/2**30, "G"): $1>=2**20? ($1/2**20, "M"): $1>=2**10? ($1/2**10, "K"): ($1, "")}e'
nmap -sS -O -oX /tmp/nmap.xml 10.1.1.0/24 -v -v && perl nmap2nagios.pl -v -r /tmp/10net.xml -o /etc/nagios/10net.cfg
perl -e 'print 1, 2, 3' > /dev/full
2009-02-19 17:08:13
User: mkc
Functions: perl
8

The Linux /dev/full file simulates a "disk full" condition, and can be used to verify how a program handles this situation.

In particular, several programming language implementations do not print error diagnostics (nor exit with error status) when I/O errors like this occur, unless the programmer has taken additional steps. That is, simple code in these languages does not fail safely. In addition to Perl, C, C++, Tcl, and Lua (for some functions) also appear not to fail safely.

perl -e 'use MIME::Base64; print encode_base64("encode me plz");'
2009-02-18 22:49:18
User: therek
Functions: perl
1

MIME::Base64 is a part of Perl5 distribution. You can also use decode_base64 for oposite result.

perl -lpe'1 while s/^([-+]?\d+)(\d{3})/$1.$2/'
perl -pe '$_=reverse;s/\d{3}(?=\d)(?!.*?\.)/$&,/g;$_=reverse'
2009-02-18 16:34:18
User: sil
Functions: perl
2

Insert a comma where necessary when counting large numbers. I needed to separate huge amounts of packets and after 12+ hours of looking in a terminal, I wanted it in readable form.