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Functions

Commands using printf from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using printf - 167 results
Split() { SENT=${*} ; sentarry=( ${SENT} ) ; while [[ ${#sentarry[@]} -gt 0 ]] ; do printf "%s\n" "${sentarry[0]}" ; sentarry=( ${sentarry[@]:1} ) ; done ; }
set-proxy () { P=webproxy:1234; DU="fred"; read -p "username[$DU]:" USER; printf "%b"; UN=${USER:-$DU}; read -s -p "password:" PASS; printf "%b" "\n"; export http_proxy="http://${UN}:${PASS}@$P/"; export ftp_proxy="http://${UN}:${PASS}@$P/"; }
2010-02-04 13:12:59
User: shadycraig
Functions: export printf read set
1

Prompts the user for username and password, that are then exported to http_proxy for use by wget, yum etc

Default user, webproxy and port are used.

Using this script prevent the cleartext user and pass being in your bash_history and on-screen

printf "%d\n" \0x64
printf "%50s\n"|tr ' ' -
2010-01-07 08:49:46
User: rodolfoap
Functions: printf tr
-2

Better -and faster- using bash printf.

printf "\e[8;70;180;t"
2010-01-07 05:58:16
User: jearsh
Functions: printf
4

Replace 70 with the desired height.

Replace 180 with the desired width.

I put it in my bashrc, because by default my terminal is too small.

p(){ printf "\033[%d;%dH\033[4%dm \033[m" $((RANDOM%LINES+1)) $((RANDOM%COLUMNS+1)) $((RANDOM%8)); }; clear;while :;do p; sleep .001;done
COL=$(( $(tput cols) / 2 )); clear; tput setaf 2; while :; do tput cup $((RANDOM%COL)) $((RANDOM%COL)); printf "%$((RANDOM%COL))s" $((RANDOM%2)); done
printf "%s\n" !(pattern) ## ksh, or bash with shopt -s extglob
2009-11-26 14:09:56
User: cfajohnson
Functions: bash printf
Tags: ls grep
-1

There's no need for ls or grep; printf is builtin to most modern shells

printf $(echo -n $1 | sed 's/\\/\\\\/g;s/\(%\)\([0-9a-fA-F][0-9a-fA-F]\)/\\x\2/g')
2009-11-25 04:27:39
User: infinull
Functions: echo printf sed
2

My version uses printf and command substitution ($()) instead of echo -e and xargs, this is a few less chars, but not real substantive difference.

Also supports lowercase hex letters and a backslash (\) will make it through unescaped

printf "%s\n" .*
2009-11-23 18:07:18
User: cfajohnson
Functions: printf
Tags: dotfiles
0

In most modern shells, printf is a builtin command.

printf "%s\n" ${PATH//:/\/* }
printf "%s\n" .*
cat *.c | { printf "se te du\nplot '-' t '' w dots\n"; tr '[[:upper:]]' '[[:lower:]]' | tr -s [[:punct:][:space:]] '\n' | sort | uniq -c | sort -nr | head -n 100 | awk '{print $1}END{print "e"}'; } | gnuplot
2009-11-20 14:53:26
User: taliver
Functions: awk cat head printf sort tr uniq
5

Uses the dumb terminal option in gnuplot to plot a graph of frequencies. In this case, we are looking at a frequency analysis of words in all of the .c files.

export I=$(date +%s); watch -t -n 1 'T=$(date +%s);E=$(($T-$I));hours=$((E / 3600)) ; seconds=$((E % 3600)) ; minutes=$((seconds / 60)) ; seconds=$((seconds % 60)) ; echo $(printf "%02d:%02d:%02d" $hours $minutes $seconds) | toilet -f shadow'
2009-10-23 07:56:30
User: m33600
Functions: date echo export printf watch
0

already described on the other two versions, this one uses ascii characters on game style to display elapsed time.

export I=$(date +%s); watch -t -n 1 'T=$(date +%s);E=$(($T-$I));hours=$((E / 3600)) ; seconds=$((E % 3600)) ; minutes=$((seconds / 60)) ; seconds=$((seconds % 60)) ; echo $(printf "%02d:%02d:%02d" $hours $minutes $seconds) | osd_cat -o 20 -d 1 -p bottom'
2009-10-23 07:47:11
User: m33600
Functions: date echo export printf watch
0

Variation of the theme, this one blinks in low profile on top level of X, ie, it is visible, indeed small.

Try changing fonts and sizes of osd_cat

export I=$(date +%s); watch -t -n 1 'T=$(date +%s);E=$(($T-$I));hours=$((E / 3600)) ; seconds=$((E % 3600)) ; minutes=$((seconds / 60)) ; seconds=$((seconds % 60)) ; echo $(printf "%02d:%02d:%02d" $hours $minutes $seconds)'
2009-10-23 07:31:44
User: m33600
Functions: date echo export printf watch
3

Works on real time clock, unix time based, decrementing the actual time from initial time saved in an environment variable exported to child process inside watch

Shows elapsed time from start of script in hh:mm:ss format

Non afected by system slow down due to the use of date.

ord() { printf "%d\n" "'$1"; }
2009-10-17 22:02:52
User: zude
Functions: printf
1

printf treats first char after single ' as numeric equivalent

printf "%d\n" "'A" "'B"
chr() { printf \\$(printf %o $1); }
chr () { printf \\$(($1/64*100+$1%64/8*10+$1%8)); }
2009-10-15 07:01:54
User: dennisw
Functions: printf
5

I've corrected the function. My octal conversion formula was completely wrong. Thanks to pgas at http://mywiki.wooledge.org/BashFAQ/071 for setting me straight. The new function is from pgas and is very fast.

(printf "PERMISSIONS LINKS OWNER GROUP SIZE MONTH DAY HH:MM PROG-NAME\n" \ ; ls -l | sed 1d) | column -t
cat file.txt | while read line; do printf "%7.2f -> %7.2f\n" $line; done
find -type f -name "*.avi" -print0 | xargs -0 mplayer -vo dummy -ao dummy -identify 2>/dev/null | perl -nle '/ID_LENGTH=([0-9\.]+)/ && ($t +=$1) && printf "%02d:%02d:%02d\n",$t/3600,$t/60%60,$t%60' | tail -n 1
2009-09-24 15:50:39
User: syssyphus
Functions: find perl printf tail xargs
10

change the *.avi to whatever you want to match, you can remove it altogether if you want to check all files.

printf "%02u " {3..20}; echo
2009-09-18 18:48:41
User: Escher
Functions: printf
Tags: bash strings
0

emulates bash4's "echo {03..20}"

Uses bash3 builtin function printf

yes "$(seq 1 255)" | while read i; do printf "\x1b[48;5;${i}m\n"; sleep .01; done