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May 19, 2015 - A Look At The New Commandlinefu
I've put together a short writeup on what kind of newness you can expect from the next iteration of clfu. Check it out here.
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Commands using ps from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using ps - 235 results
ps -o euid,egid --ppid `netstat --inet --inet6 -pln|awk '/:80 / { split($7,tmp, "/"); print tmp[1]; }'`|sort |uniq|grep -v EUID
2010-11-18 21:22:29
User: chx
Functions: awk grep ps sort

This command allows you to find the effective uid and gid of the Apache process regardless of process name (which can be apache2 or httpd depending on distro).

ps -e -orss=,args= | sort -b -k1,1n | pr -TW$COLUMNS
ps ax -L -o pid,tid,psr,pcpu,args | sort -nr -k4| head -15 | cut -c 1-90
ps uw --ppid $PID
ps axo pid,ppid | awk "{ if ( \$2 == $PID ) { print \$1 }}")
set $(ps -e o command= | grep "^/usr/bin/X "); while [ x"$1" != x"-auth" ]; do shift; done; sudo x11vnc -display :0 -auth "$2"
ps -u $USER -lf | grep -vE "\-bash|sshd|ps|grep|PPID" > .tmpkill; if (( $(cat .tmpkill | wc -l) > 0 )); then echo "# KILL EM ALL"; cat .tmpkill; cat .tmpkill | awk '{print $4}' | xargs kill -9; else echo "# NOTHING TO KILL"; fi; cat .tmpkill; rm .tmpkill;
2010-11-04 04:16:50
User: zsugiart
Functions: awk cat echo grep kill ps rm wc xargs

Kills all process that belongs to the user that runs it - excluding bash, sshd (so putty/ssh session will be spared). The bit that says grep -vE "..." can be extended to include ps line patterns that you want to spare.

If no process can be found on the hitlist, it will print # NOTHING TO KILL. Otherwise, it will print # KILL EM ALL, with the cull list.

ps -o lstart <pid>
for p in `ps L|cut -d' ' -f1`;do echo -e "`tput clear;read -p$p -n1 p`";ps wwo pid:6,user:8,comm:10,$p kpid -A;done

While going through the source code for the well known ps command, I read about some interesting things.. Namely, that there are a bunch of different fields that ps can try and enumerate for you. These are fields I was not able to find in the man pages, documentation, only in the source.

Here is a longer function that goes through each of the formats recognized by the ps on your machine, executes it, and then prompts you whether you would like to add it or not. Adding it simply adds it to an array that is then printed when you ctrl-c or at the end of the function run. This lets you save your favorite ones and then see the command to put in your .bash_profile like mine at : http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html

Note that I had to do the exec method below in order to pause with read.

t ()


local r l a P f=/tmp/ps c='command ps wwo pid:6,user:8,vsize:8,comm:20' IFS=' ';

trap 'exec 66

exec 66 $f && command ps L | tr -s ' ' >&$f;

while read -u66 l >&/dev/null; do

a=${l/% */};

$c,$a k -${a//%/} -A;

yn "Add $a" && P[$SECONDS]=$a;



ps -ef | grep [j]boss | awk '{print $2}'|xargs kill -9
2010-09-30 15:55:41
User: utoxin
Functions: awk grep kill ps xargs
Tags: kill

Removed unneeded grep -v by making the initial grep unable to match itself.

ps ax | grep -c [c]at
2010-09-23 20:18:29
User: utoxin
Functions: grep ps

'ps ax' provides the fill list of running processes.

'grep -c [c]at' will find all processes that match 'cat' without matching itself....

ps -cx cat
ps -a | grep -c cat
ps -a |grep cat |wc -l
ps ax --format=pid,eip,esp,user,command
2010-09-02 12:40:41
User: cicatriz
Functions: ps

'ps' let you specify the format that you want to see on the output.

ps -axgu | cut -f1 -d' ' | sort -u
ps -eo user | sort -u
2010-07-07 12:28:44
User: dfaulkner
Functions: ps sort

Shows a list of users that currently running processes are executing as.

YMMV regarding ps and it's many variants. For example, you might need:

ps -axgu | cut -f1 -d' ' | sort -u
wmctrl -l -p | while read line; do ps -o cmd= "$(echo "$line" | awk '$0=$3')"; done > ~/.windows
2010-07-04 22:11:24
User: matthewbauer
Functions: ps read

This will save your open windows to a file (~/.windows).

To start those applications:

cat ~/.windows | while read line; do $line &; done

Should work on any EWMH/NetWM compatible X Window Manager.

If you use DWM or another Window Manager not using EWMH or NetWM try this:

xwininfo -root -children | grep '^ ' | grep -v children | grep -v '<unknown>' | sed -n 's/^ *\(0x[0-9a-f]*\) .*/\1/p' | uniq | while read line; do xprop -id $line _NET_WM_PID | sed -n 's/.* = \([0-9]*\)$/\1/p'; done | uniq -u | grep -v '^$' | while read line; do ps -o cmd= $line; done > ~/.windows
ps auxwww | grep outofcontrolprocess | awk '{print $2}' | xargs kill -9
ps ux|grep <process name>|awk '{print $2}'|xargs -n 1 kill
ps h -o pid,command | grep 'TEXT' | sed 's/^ \+//' | cut -d ' ' -f 1 | xargs -n 1 kill
ps -o comm,%mem,args -u www-data
command ps wwo pid,user,group,vsize:8,size:8,sz:6,rss:6,pmem:7,pcpu:7,time:7,wchan,sched=,stat,flags,comm,args k -vsz -A|sed -u '/^ *PID/d;10q'

I've wanted this for a long time, finally just sat down and came up with it. This shows you the sorted output of ps in a pretty format perfect for cron or startup scripts. You can sort by changing the k -vsz to k -pmem for example to sort by memory instead.

If you want a function, here's one from my http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html

aa_top_ps(){ local T N=${1:-10};T=${2:-vsz}; ps wwo pid,user,group,vsize:8,size:8,sz:6,rss:6,pmem:7,pcpu:7,time:7,wchan,sched=,stat,flags,comm,args k -${T} -A|sed -u "/^ *PID/d;${N}q"; }
ps hax -o user | sort | uniq -c
ps aux |awk '{$1} {++P[$1]} END {for(a in P) if (a !="USER") print a,P[a]}'
2010-04-28 15:25:18
User: benyounes
Functions: awk ps

enumerates the number of processes for each user.

ps BSD format is used here , for standard Unix format use : ps -eLf |awk '{$1} {++P[$1]} END {for(a in P) if (a !="UID") print a,P[a]}'