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Commands using ps from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using ps - 232 results
ps -ef | grep [t]clsh
echo COMMAND | xargs -ixxx ps -C xxx -o pid= | xargs -ixxx ls -l /proc/xxx/cwd
ps auxwww | grep outofcontrolprocess | awk '{print $9}' | xargs kill -9
ps aux | awk '/name/ {print $2}'
2009-02-20 21:35:52
User: evil_otto
Functions: awk ps

This finds a process id by name, but without the extra grep that you usually see. Remember, awk can grep too!

ps -eo stat,pid,user,command | egrep "^STAT|^D|^R"
2009-02-20 19:00:17
User: jyoder
Functions: egrep ps

Want to know why your load average is so high? Run this command to see what processes are on the run queue. Runnable processes have a status of "R", and commands waiting on I/O have a status of "D".

On some older versions of Linux may require -emo instead of -eo.

On Solaris: ps -aefL -o s -o user -o comm | egrep "^O|^R|COMMAND"

ps auxw |egrep "PID|process_to_look_at"
2009-02-20 00:17:43
User: tsaavik
Functions: ps


root 1828 0.0 0.0 5396 476 ? Ss 2008 0:00 /usr/sbin/sshd

x11vnc -display :0 -auth $(ps -ef|awk '/xauth/ {print $15}'|head -1) -forever -bg &
2009-02-19 18:55:54
User: nottings
Functions: ps

the $15 may change for you depending on your distro, etc...

ps aux | grep -i firefox | grep -v grep | awk '{print $2}' | xargs -t -i kill -9 {}
2009-02-19 18:50:00
User: blackdude
Functions: awk grep kill ps xargs

This is a nice way to kill processes.. the example here is for firefox!!! substitute firefox for whatever the process name is...

ps -o ppid= <given pid> | xargs ps -p
psg () { ps auxwww | egrep "$1|PID" | grep -v grep }
2009-02-18 23:37:35
User: mulad
Functions: egrep grep ps

Yet another ps grep function, but this one includes the column headings.

psg() { if [ -z "$2" ]; then psargs="aux"; greparg="$1"; else psargs="$1"; greparg="$2"; fi; ps $psargs | grep -i "$(echo $greparg | sed -e 's/^\(.\)/[\1]/')\|^$(ps $psargs | head -1)" ; }
2009-02-18 20:57:17
User: DEinspanjer
Functions: grep ps

My variant on this common function. Some highlights:

Allows you to override the default ps args of "aux"

Uses bracket trick to omit the grep process itself without having to use a second grep

Always prints the correct header row of ps output

Limitations: Ugly ps error output if you forget to quote your multi word grep argument

ps -C thisdaemon || { thisdaemon & }
2009-02-18 14:12:17
User: sil
Functions: ps

This comes in handy if you have daemons/programs that have potential issues and stop/disappear, etc., can be run in cron to ensure that a program remains up no matter what. Be advised though, if a program did core out, you'd likely want to know why (gdb) so use with caution on production machines.

ps -e
ps -ef | grep $USERNAME | awk {'print $2'} | xargs kill [-9]
2009-02-17 20:35:35
User: TheNomad
Functions: awk grep kill ps xargs

This is a 'killall' command equivalent where it is not available.

Prior to executing it, set the environment variable USERNAME to the username, whose processes you want to kill or replace the username with the $USERNAME on the command above.

Side effect: If any processes from other users, are running with a parameter of $USERNAME, they will be killed as well (assuming you are running this as root user)

[-9] in square brackets at the end of the command is optional and strongly suggested to be your last resort. I do not like to use it as the killed process leaves a lot of mess behind.

ps aux | grep "[s]ome_text"
2009-02-17 02:10:50
User: SiegeX
Functions: grep ps

The trick here is to use the brackets [ ] around any one of the characters of the grep string. This uses the fact that [?] is a character class of one letter and will be removed when parsed by the shell. This is useful when you want to parse the output of grep or use the return value in an if-statement without having its own process causing it to erroneously return TRUE.

ps -eo pcpu,pid,args | sort -n
2009-02-16 14:23:03
Functions: ps sort

Useful to detect which process is causing system loads. It shows process PID so as we can take further actions.

ps aux | awk '{sum+=$6} END {print sum/1024}'
xprop | awk '/PID/ {print $3}' | xargs ps h -o pid,cmd
2009-02-16 07:55:19
User: jackhab
Functions: awk ps xargs

This command is useful when you want to know what process is responsible for a certain GUI application and what command you need to issue to launch it in terminal.

ps gv [pid] | head -2
2009-02-12 05:04:55
User: ren
Functions: head ps

sh as:

#! /bin/sh

while [ 1 -ne 6 ]; do

pid=`ps -ef | grep -v "grep" | grep "trans_gzdy" | cut -c10-17`

ps gv $pid | head -2

sleep 1


check changes of RSS.

ps aux | grep [h]ttpd
2009-02-10 02:59:20
User: abcde
Functions: grep ps

Surround the first letter of what you are grepping with square brackets and you won't have to spawn a second instance of grep -v. You could also use an alias like this (albeit with sed):

alias psgrep='ps aux | grep $(echo $1 | sed "s/^\(.\)/[\1]/g")'

kill -HUP ` ps -aef | grep -i firefox | sort -k 2 -r | sed 1d | awk ' { print $2 } ' `
pidof () { ps acx | egrep -i $@ | awk '{print $1}'; }
ps awwux|awk '{print $1}'|sort|uniq
ps aux | awk '{ print $8 " " $2 " " $11}' | grep -w Z
ps auxf
2009-02-05 18:07:16
User: systemj
Functions: ps

Shows a tree view of parent to child processes in the output of ps (linux). Similar output can be achieved with pstree (also linux) or ptree (Solaris).