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Commands using read from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using read - 303 results
yes "$(seq 1 255)" | while read i; do printf "\x1b[48;5;${i}m\n"; sleep .01; done
du -a --max-depth=1 | sort -n | cut -d/ -f2 | sed '$d' | while read i; do if [ -f $i ]; then du -h "$i"; else echo "$(du -h --max-depth=0 "$i")/"; fi; done
2009-09-03 20:43:43
User: nickwe
Functions: cut du echo read sed sort
3

Based on the MrMerry one, just add some visuals to differentiate files and directories

find . -maxdepth 1 -type d|xargs du -a --max-depth=0|sort -rn|cut -d/ -f2|sed '1d'|while read i;do echo "$(du -h --max-depth=0 "$i")/";done;find . -maxdepth 1 -type f|xargs du -a|sort -rn|cut -d/ -f2|sed '$d'|while read i;do du -h "$i";done
2009-09-03 20:33:21
User: nickwe
Functions: cut du echo find read sed sort xargs
2

Based on the MrMerry one, just add some visuals and sort directory and files

while read server; do ssh -n user@$server "command"; done < servers.txt
2009-08-29 06:52:34
User: sharfah
Functions: read ssh
10

The important thing to note in this command, is the "-n" flag.

ls *.c | while read F; do gcc -Wall -o `echo $F | cut -d . -f 1 - ` $F; done
2009-08-28 13:01:56
User: pichinep
Functions: cut gcc ls read
-7

Compile *.c files with "gcc -Wall" in actual directory, using as output file the file name without extension.

ls | while read f; do mv "$f" "${f// /_}";done
find /dir | awk '{print length, $0}' | sort -nr | sed 's/^[[:digit:]]* //' | while read dirfile; do outfile="$(echo "$(basename "$dirfile")" | unaccent UTF-8)"; mv "$dirfile" "$(dirname "$dirfile")/$outfile"; done
2009-08-24 21:24:18
User: Patola
Functions: awk basename find mv read sed sort
2

This command changes all filename and directories within a directory tree to unaccented ones. I had to do this to 'sanitize' some samba-exported trees. The reason it works might seem a little difficult to see at first - it first reverses-sort by pathname length, then it renames only the basename of the path. This way it'll always go in the right order to rename everything.

Some notes:

1. You'll have to have the 'unaccent' command. On Ubuntu, just aptitude install unaccent.

2. In this case, the encoding of the tree was UTF-8 - but you might be using another one, just adjust the command to your encoding.

3. The program might spit a few harmless errors saying the files are the same - not to fear.

pgrep -u `id -u` firefox-bin || find ~/.mozilla/firefox -name '*.sqlite'|(while read -e f; do echo 'vacuum;'|sqlite3 "$f" ; done)
2009-08-22 10:36:05
User: kamathln
Functions: echo find read
11

Sqlite database keeps collecting cruft as time passes, which can be cleaned by the 'vacuum;' command. This command cleans up the cruft in all sqlite files relating to the user you have logged in as. This command has to be run when firefox is not running, or it will exit displaying the pid of the firefox running.

ls -1 *.jpg | while read fn; do export pa=`exiv2 "$fn" | grep timestamp | awk '{ print $4 " " $5 ".jpg"}' | tr ":" "-"`; mv "$fn" "$pa"; done
2009-08-10 00:52:22
User: axanc
Functions: awk export grep ls mv read tr
0

Renames all the jpg files as their timestamps with ".jpg" extension.

md5sum * | sed 's/^\(\w*\)\s*\(.*\)/\2 \1/' | while read LINE; do mv $LINE; done
find . -iname '*filename*.doc' | { while read line; do antiword "$line"; done; } | grep -C4 search_term;
2009-07-28 15:49:58
User: Ben
Functions: find grep read
3

Find Word docs by filename in the current directory, convert each of them to plain text using antiword (taking care of spaces in filenames), then grep for a search term in the particular file.

(Of course, it's better to save your data as plain text to make for easier grepping, but that's not always possible.)

Requires antiword. Or you can modify it to use catdoc instead.

while true ; do IFS="" read i; echo "$i"; sleep .01; done < <(tr -c "[:digit:]" " " < /dev/urandom | dd cbs=$COLUMNS conv=unblock | GREP_COLOR="1;32" grep --color "[^ ]")
2009-07-22 03:59:07
Functions: dd echo grep read sleep tr true
Tags: color
2

Same as above but slooooow it down

dpkg -S `which nm` | cut -d':' -f1 | (read PACKAGE; echo "[${PACKAGE}]"; dpkg -s "${PACKAGE}"; dpkg -L "${PACKAGE}") | less
2009-07-14 20:21:48
User: mohan43u
Functions: cut echo read
Tags: which dpkg
2

In Debian based distros, this command will list 'binutils' package details which contains 'nm' command. You can replace 'nm' to any other command.

ssh [email protected] 'tail --max-unchanged-stats=10 -n0 -F /var/log/auth.log ' | grep Accepted | while read l ; do kdialog --title "SSH monitor" --passivepopup "$l" 3; done
yes "$(seq 232 255;seq 254 -1 233)" | while read i; do printf "\x1b[48;5;${i}m\n"; sleep .01; done
function duf { du -sk "$@" | sort -n | while read size fname; do for unit in k M G T P E Z Y; do if [ $size -lt 1024 ]; then echo -e "${size}${unit}\t${fname}"; break; fi; size=$((size/1024)); done; done; }
find `echo "${PATH}" | tr ':' ' '` -type f | while read COMMAND; do man -f "${COMMAND##*/}"; done
2009-06-13 19:56:24
User: mohan43u
Functions: find man read tr
Tags: man find read while tr
3

Obviously, you can replace 'man' command with any command in this command line to do useful things. I just want to mention that there is a way to list all the commands which you can execute directly without giving fullpath.

Normally all important commands will be placed in your PATH directories. This commandline uses that variable to get commands. Works in Ubuntu, will work in all 'manpage' configured *nix systems.

function my_irc { tmp=`mktemp`; cat > $tmp; { echo -e "USER $username x x :$ircname\nNICK $nick\nJOIN $target"; while read line; do echo -e "PRIVMSG $target :$line"; done < $tmp; } | nc $server > /dev/null ; rm $tmp; }
2009-06-11 22:14:48
User: Josay
Functions: cat echo read rm
Tags: netcat irc nc
1
command | my_irc

Pipe whatever you want to this function, it will, if everything goes well, be redirected to a channel or a user on an IRC server.

Please note that :

- I am not responsible of flood excesses you might provoke.

- that function does not reply to PINGs from the server. That's the reason why I first write in a temporary file. Indeed, I don't want to wait for inputs while being connected to the server. However, according to the configuration of the server and the length of your file, you may timeout before finishing.

- Concerning the server, the variable content must be on the form "irc.server.org 6667" (or any other port). If you want to make some tests, you can also create a fake IRC server on "localhost 55555" by using

netcat -l -p 55555

- Concerning the target, you can choose a channel (beginning with a '#' like "#chan") or a user (like "user")

- The other variables have obvious names.

kill_daemon() { echo "Daemon?"; read dm; kill -15 $(netstat -atulpe | grep $dm | cut -d '/' -f1 | awk '{print $9}') }; alias kd='kill_daemon
2009-05-26 20:39:56
User: P17
-5

Just find out the daemon with $ netstat -atulpe. Then type in his name and he gets the SIGTERM.

F="$HOME/.moz*/fire*/*/session*.js" ; grep -Go 'entries:\[[^]]*' $F | cut -d[ -f2 | while read A ; do echo $A | sed s/url:/\n/g | tail -1 | cut -d\" -f2; done
2009-05-21 21:58:42
User: b2e
Functions: cut echo grep read sed tail
2

Tuned for short command line - you can set the path to sessionstore.js more reliable instead of use asterixes etc.

Usable when you are not at home and really need to get your actual opened tabs on your home computer (via SSH). I am using it from my work if I forgot to bookmark some new interesting webpage, which I have visited at home. Also other way to list tabs when your firefox has crashed (restoring of tabs doesn't work always).

This script includes also tabs which has been closed short time before.

find . -name "*.jar" | while read file; do echo "Processing ${file}"; jar -tvf $file | grep "Foo.class"; done
VARNAMES='ID FORENAME LASTNAME ADDRESS CITY PHONE MOBILE MAIL' ; cat customer.csv | while read LINE ; do COUNT=1 ; for VAR in $VARNAMES ; do eval "${VAR}=`echo $LINE | /usr/bin/awk {'print $'$COUNT''}`" ; let COUNT=COUNT+1 ; done ; done
2009-05-19 11:23:00
User: GeckoDH
Functions: cat eval read
-1

VARNAMES='ID FORENAME LASTNAME ADDRESS CITY PHONE MOBILE MAIL ...'

cat customer.csv | while read LINE ; do

COUNT=1

for VAR in $VARNAMES ; do

eval "${VAR}=`echo $LINE | /usr/bin/awk {'print $'$COUNT''}`"

let COUNT=COUNT+1

done

done

Maybe you have a CSV-File with addresses, where you have to process each contact (one per line, write each value to own variable). Of course you can define every variable, but this way is more simple and faster (to write).

VARNAMES includes the variable names. Pay attention: the number of names in VARNAMES have to be the same than in the CSV-file the fields. If the CSV is not seperated with ";", you can set the seperator after the awk-binary with -F"_" for example.

read -p "Which station? "; mplayer --reallyquiet -vo none -ao sdl http://somafm.com/startstream=${REPLY}.pls
2009-05-04 00:26:19
User: denzuko
Functions: read
11

This command asks for the station name and then connects to somafm, Great for those who have linux home entertainment boxes and ssh enabled on them, just for the CLI fiends out there ( I know I'm one of them ;)

Also, don't forget to add this as alias(ie alias somafm="read -p 'Which Station? "; mplayer --reallyquite -vo none -ao sdl

screen -ls | grep pts | gawk '{ split($1, x, "."); print x[1] }' | while read i; do gnome-terminal -e screen\ -dx\ $i; done
2009-04-22 10:36:39
User: microft
Functions: gawk grep read screen
3

connects to all the screen instances running.

echo "12345,12346" |sed -e's/ //'|tr "," "\n"| while read line; do echo -n $line" "; svn log -vr $line https://url/to/svn/repository/|grep "/"|head -1|cut -d"/" -f2; done