What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again.

Delete that bloated snippets file you've been using and share your personal repository with the world. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

If you have a new feature suggestion or find a bug, please get in touch via http://commandlinefu.uservoice.com/

Get involved!

You can sign-in using OpenID credentials, or register a traditional username and password.

First-time OpenID users will be automatically assigned a username which can be changed after signing in.

Universal configuration monitoring and system of record for IT.

Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for:



May 19, 2015 - A Look At The New Commandlinefu
I've put together a short writeup on what kind of newness you can expect from the next iteration of clfu. Check it out here.
March 2, 2015 - New Management
I'm Jon, I'll be maintaining and improving clfu. Thanks to David for building such a great resource!

Top Tags





Commands using sed from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using sed - 1,136 results
psql -h <SERVER NAME HERE> -c 'SELECT version();' | grep -v 'version\|---\|row\|^ *$' | sed 's/^\s*//'
2014-03-17 18:36:40
User: pnelsonsr
Functions: grep sed

In a multiple PostgreSQL server environment knowing the servers version can be important. Note that psql --version returns just the local psql apps version which may not be what you want. This command dumps the PostgreSQL servers version out to one line. You may need to add more command line options to the psql command for your connection environment.

for i in `sudo /sbin/fdisk -l |grep Disk |grep dev |awk '{ print $2 }' |sed s/://g` ; do sudo /usr/bin/dd if=/dev/urandom of=$i bs=8M & done
2014-03-16 12:04:59
User: aimana007
Functions: awk grep sed sudo
Tags: bash Linux

This command will use the fdisk utility to find all block devices on your system, and overwrite them with data from the /dev/urandom non-blocking random number generator.

CAUTION: This will irrevocably erase EVERY SINGLE physical block storage device visible to the fdisk utility, including plugged USB devices, RAID sets, LVM, etc.

netstat -tn 2>/dev/null | grep ':80 ' | awk '{print $5}' |sed -e 's/::ffff://' | cut -f1 -d: | sort | uniq -c | sort -rn | head
2014-03-12 12:43:07
User: copocaneta
Functions: awk cut grep netstat sed sort uniq

IP addresses and number of connections connected to port 80.

/usr/bin/lynx -dump -width 500 | awk 'BEGIN { FS = " " } ; { print $12 }' | sed '/^$/d' | sort | uniq -c | sort -n
cat skype_log | sed -s 's/\(\[.*\]\) \(.*\): \(.*\)/<\2> \3/'
inotifywait -mr -e CREATE $HOME/bin/ | while read i; do chmod +x $(echo "$i" | sed 's/ \S* //'); done
grep -o -P '[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\:[0-9]{1,5}\s->\s{5}[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\:[0-9]{1,5}' <capture file> | tr -d ' ' | sed 's/:.....//g' | sort -n | uniq -c | sort -nr
2014-03-05 21:34:42
User: santizo
Functions: grep sed sort tr uniq

Sort netflow packet capture by unique connections excluding source port.

bashrc-reload() { builtin unalias -a; builtin unset -f $(builtin declare -F | sed 's/^.*declare[[:blank:]]\+-f[[:blank:]]\+//'); . ~/.bashrc; }
2014-03-02 14:24:18
User: Xk2c
Functions: sed unalias unset

Simply sourcing .bashrc does not function correctly when you edit it and change an alias for a function or the other way round with the *same name*.

I therefor use this function. Prior to re-sourcing .bashrc it unsets all aliases and functions.

lspci -vv | grep 'Ethernet\|Serial' | awk 'NR == 1{ printf $1 } NR == 2 { print " mac " $7 }' | sed ?e 's/-/:/g' -e 's/:f[ef]:f[ef]//g' -e 's/01:00.0/eth0/g' -e 's/01:00.1/eth1/g' -e 's/01:00.2/eth2/g' -e 's/01:00.3/eth3/g' > /etc/iftab && ifrename
2014-03-01 20:07:18
Functions: awk grep lspci printf sed

for redhat systems works sometimes :S tested on dell poweredge r7+ systems

cat /proc/cpuinfo | grep BogoMIPS | uniq | sed 's/^.*://g' | awk '{print($1 / 4) }'
sed -i '1iI am a new line' file.txt
2014-02-22 14:36:57
User: bbates
Functions: sed

You can use \n in your inserted data to insert multiple lines.

The leading number is the position in the file where you want the insert, so in this case a '1' indicates the top of the file.

unzip -p doc.odt content.xml | sed 's|<[^>]*>| |g' | wc -l
ps -eo etime,pid,pcpu,ppid,args | sed -e '/\[.\+\]/d' -e '/^[ \t]*[0-9]\{2\}:[0-9]\{2\} /d' | sort -k1r
2014-02-14 00:22:31
User: neurodrone
Functions: ps sed sort

If you have ever been trying to look for a list of processes based on their elapsed time you don't need to look any further.

This command lets you find the list of processes ordered in a reversed order (oldest at the top) that have been running for over an hour on your system. Any system processes are filtered out, leaving only user initiated ones in. I find it extremely useful for debugging and performance analysis.

any command | sed "s/^/\[`date +"%Y%m%d%H%M%S"`]/"
quickscript () { filename="$1"; history | cut -c 8- | sed -e '/^###/{h;d};H;$!d;x' | sed '$d' > ${filename:?No filename given} }
2014-02-09 12:19:29
User: joedhon
Functions: cut sed

In order to write bash-scripts, I often do the task manually to see how it works. I type ### at the start of my session.

The function fetches the commands from the last occurrence of '###', excluding the function call. You could prefix this with a here-document to have a proper script-header.

Delete some lines, add a few variables and a loop, and you're ready to go.

This function could probably be much shorter...

sed -ru 's/(.)\1{4,}/\1/g'
2014-02-03 12:26:05
User: kryptylomese
Functions: sed

Piping a repeated character through the command will result in a single character only if there are more than 4 of them e.g.

echo "aaaaaa bbbbb cccc ddd" | sed -ru 's/(.)\1{4,}/\1/g'

the output will be "a b cccc ddd"

sed -ru 's/(..)\1{2,}/\1/g'
2014-02-03 12:18:31
User: kryptylomese
Functions: sed

This will remove repeated characters e.g.

echo "xtxtxtxt" | sed -ru 's/(..)\1{2,}/\1/g'

the output will just be "xt"

for i in xxxx*.mp4; do j=`echo $i | sed 's/ - \([0-9][0-9]\). / S1E\1 - /g'`; mv "$i" "$j"; done
2014-02-01 21:17:33
User: tomtom99
Functions: mv sed

Renames all files in the following format

xxxxxx - 34. yyyyy.mp4

to the following format

xxxxxx S1E34 - yyyyy.mp4

find . -name "*.URL" | while read file ; do cat "$file" | sed 's/InternetShortcut/Desktop Entry/' | sed '/^\(URL\|\[\)/!d' > "$file".desktop && echo "Type=Link" >> "$file".desktop ; done
sed -n 's/.*\(\(\(^\| \)[0-9]\{1,3\}\.\)\{1\}\([0-9]\{1,3\}\.\)\{2\}[0-9]\{1,3\}\) .*/\1/gp'
2014-01-29 23:18:14
User: smkr
Functions: sed
Tags: sed ip address

looks for IPs at the beginning of the line or prefixed by a space

phpunit --log-json php://stdout | awk '$NF ~ '/,/' && $1 ~ /"(test|time)"/' | cut -d: -f2- | sed "N;s/\n/--/" | sed "s/,//"| awk 'BEGIN{FS="--"}; {print $2 $1}' | sort -r | head -n 5
iconv -f $(file -bi filename.ext | sed -e 's/.*[ ]charset=//') -t utf8 filename.ext > filename.ext
ls --color=never -1| grep -E "[0-9]{4}"|sed -re "s/^(.*)([0-9]{4})(.*)$/\2 \1\2\3/" | sort -r
finfo() { [[ -f "$(cygpath "$@")" ]] || { echo "bad-file";return 1;}; echo "$(wmic datafile where name=\""$(echo "$(cygpath -wa "$@")"|sed 's/\\/\\\\/g')"\" get /value)"|sed 's/\r//g;s/^M$//;/^$/d'|awk -F"=" '{print $1"=""\033[1m"$2"\033[0m"}';}
2013-12-30 07:47:41
User: lowjax
Functions: awk echo return sed

Pass the files path to finfo(), can be unix path, dos path, relative or absolute. The file is converted into an absolute nix path, then checked to see if it is in-fact a regular/existing file. Then converted into an absolute windows path and sent to "wmic". Then magic, you have windows file details right in the terminal. Uses: cygwin, cygpath, sed, and awk. Needs Windows WMI "wmic.exe" to be operational. The output is corrected for easy...

finfo notepad.exe finfo "C:\windows\system32\notepad.exe" finfo /cygdrive/c/Windows/System32/notepad.exe finfo "/cygdrive/c/Program Files/notepad.exe" finfo ../notepad.exe
bind -P | grep -v "is not" | sed -e 's/can be found on/:/' | column -s: -t
2013-12-19 12:30:19
User: leni536
Functions: column grep sed

Shows all available keyboard bindings in bash. Pretty printing.