Hide

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again.

Delete that bloated snippets file you've been using and share your personal repository with the world. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.


Get involved!

You can sign-in using OpenID credentials, or register a traditional username and password.

First-time OpenID users will be automatically assigned a username which can be changed after signing in.

Universal configuration monitoring and system of record for IT.
Hide

Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for:

Hide

News

May 19, 2015 - A Look At The New Commandlinefu
I've put together a short writeup on what kind of newness you can expect from the next iteration of clfu. Check it out here.
March 2, 2015 - New Management
I'm Jon, I'll be maintaining and improving clfu. Thanks to David for building such a great resource!
Hide

Top Tags

Hide

Functions

Psst. Open beta.

Wow, didn't really expect you to read this far down. The latest iteration of the site is in open beta. It's a gentle open beta-- not in prime-time just yet. It's being hosted over at UpGuard (link) and you are more than welcome to give it a shot. Couple things:

  • » The open beta is running a copy of the database that will not carry over to the final version. Don't post anything you don't mind losing.
  • » If you wish to use your user account, you will probably need to reset your password.
Your feedback is appreciated via the form on the beta page. Thanks! -Jon & CLFU Team

Commands using sed from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using sed - 1,155 results
git reflog show | grep '}: commit' | nl | sort -nr | nl | sort -nr | cut --fields=1,3 | sed s/commit://g | sed -e 's/HEAD*@{[0-9]*}://g'
detectlanguage(){ curl -s "http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/services/language/detect?v=1.0&q=$@" | sed 's/{"responseData": {"language":"\([^"]*\)".*/\1\n/'; }
2010-03-08 03:24:56
User: matthewbauer
Functions: sed
Tags: language
5

Usage:

detectlanguage <phrase>

Example:

detectlanguage hola
translate(){ wget -qO- "http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/services/language/translate?v=1.0&q=$1&langpair=$2|${3:-en}" | sed 's/.*"translatedText":"\([^"]*\)".*}/\1\n/'; }
2010-03-08 03:15:48
User: matthewbauer
Functions: sed wget
64

Usage:

translate <phrase> <source-language> <output-language>

Example:

translate hello en es

See this for a list of language codes:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_ISO_639-1_codes

libquery=/lib32/libgcc_s.so.1; if [ `nm -D $libquery | sed -n '/[0-9A-Fa-f]\{8,\}/ {p; q;}' | grep "[0-9A-Fa-f]\{16\}" | wc -l` == 1 ]; then echo "$libquery is a 64 bit library"; else echo "$libquery is a 32 bit library"; fi;
2010-03-07 04:24:08
User: birnam
Functions: echo grep sed wc
Tags: bash nm
2

Determines the flavor of a shared library by looking at the addresses of its exposed functions and seeing if they are 16 bytes or 8 bytes long. The command is written so the library you are querying is passed to a variable up font -- it would be simple to convert this to a bash function or script using this format.

2end () ( export LC_ALL=C; nl -n rz $1 > $1.tmp; ${EDITOR:-vi} $1.tmp; sort $1.tmp | sed -r 's/^.*[0-9]+\t+//' > $1; rm $1.tmp; )
2010-03-06 23:02:28
User: bartonski
Functions: export nl rm sed sort
0

This function is used to sort selected lines of a text file to the end of that file. Especially useful in cases where human intervention is necessary to sort out parts of a file. Let's say that you have a text file which contains the words

rough

slimy

red

fluff

dough

For whatever reason, you want to sort all words rhyming with 'tough' to the bottom of the file, and all words denoting colors to the top, while keeping the order of the rest of the file intact.

'$EDITOR' will open, showing all of the lines in the given file, numbered with '0' padding. Adding a '~' to the beginning of the line will cause the line to sort to the end of the file, adding '!' will cause it to sort to the beginning.

ifconfig | awk '/inet addr/ {print $2 }' | sed 's/.*://g'
2010-03-04 08:15:08
User: Guyverix
Functions: awk ifconfig sed
-2

Easy way to grab the IP address of a machine for easy script use. If needed a "| grep -v 127.0.0.1" at the end will suppress localhost.

curl -sL xkcd.com | grep '<img [^>]*/><br/>' | sed -r 's|<img src="(.*)" title="(.*)" alt="(.*)" /><br/>|\1\t\2\t\3|' > /tmp/a; curl -s $(cat /tmp/a | cut -f1) | convert - -gravity south -draw "text 0,0 \"$(cat /tmp/a | cut -f2)\"" pdf:- > xkcd.pdf
2010-03-03 03:41:31
User: matthewbauer
Functions: cat cut grep sed
Tags: pdf xkcd caption
6

Saves to a PDF with title and alt text of comic.

As asked for on http://bbs.archlinux.org/viewtopic.php?id=91100

Change xkcd.com to dynamic.xkcd.com/comics/random for a random comic.

ls -d */* | sed -e 's/^/\"/g' -e 's/$/\"/g' | xargs mv -t $(pwd)
2010-03-01 23:43:26
User: leovailati
Functions: ls mv sed xargs
-1

You WILL have problems if the files have the same name.

Use cases: consolidate music library and unify photos (especially if your camera separates images by dates).

After running the command and verifying if there was no name issues, you can use

ls -d */ | sed -e 's/^/\"/g' -e 's/$/\"/g' | xargs rm -r

to remove now empty subdirectories.

find . -type f -exec sed -i 's/gw10./gw17./g' {} \;
sed 's+href="\([^"]*\)"+\n\1\n+g' bookmarks.html | grep '^http' |clive
2010-03-01 20:17:22
Functions: grep sed
0

Parses your exported bookmarks to generate a clean list of http lines and passes it on to clive to try to download the video file from various sites.

while true; do xdotool getmouselocation | sed 's/x:\(.*\) y:\(.*\) screen:.*/\1, \2/' >> ./mouse-tracking; sleep 10; done
2010-02-27 04:00:13
User: matthewbauer
Functions: sed sleep
4

Will track your mouse and save it to a file.

You can use gnuplot to graph it:

gnuplot -persist <(echo "unset key;unset border;unset yzeroaxis;unset xtics;unset ytics;unset ztics;plot './mouse-tracking' with points lt 1 pt 6 ps variable")
find . -iname "FILENAME" -exec sed -i 's/SEARCH_STRING/REPLACE_STRING/g' {} \;
2010-02-24 19:52:22
User: nanopino
Functions: find sed
1

using find's exec option instead of a for loop and using sed's -i option for inplace replacement. no need to do the file swap.

sed -i -e 's/SEARCH_STRING/REPLACE_STRING/g' `find . -iname 'FILENAME'`
for file in `find . -iname "FILENAME"`; do cat $file | sed "s/SEARCH_STRING/REPLACE_STRING/" > $file.tmp; mv $file.tmp $file; done
function skreemplay() { lynx -dump "http://skreemr.com/results.jsp?q=$*" | grep mp3$ | sed 's/^.* //' | xargs mplayer }
2010-02-24 08:44:01
User: thelan
Functions: grep sed xargs
1

This use the Screemr search engine to play mp3 songs

ls -RAx | grep "svn:$" | sed -e "s/svn:/svn/" | xargs rm -fr
cat authorized_keys_with_broken_lines | sed 's,^ssh,%ssh,' | tr '\n' '\0' | tr '%' '\n' | sed '1d' | sed "/^$/d" > authorized_keys
2010-02-19 08:32:35
User: pepin
Functions: cat sed tr
0

when someone mail you his ssh public key, and the lines are broken with '\n', you can reconstruct a new file with one key by line with this command.

sed -i [email protected][email protected]/g' `grep [email protected] -rl .`
2010-02-18 18:26:09
User: and3k
Functions: sed
0

Do a recursive (-r) search with grep for all files where your old mail address is mentioned (-l shows only the file names) and use sed to replace it with your new address. Works with other search/replacement patterns too.

find . -type f |sed "s#.*/##g" |sort |uniq -c -d
2010-02-17 11:59:54
User: shadycraig
Functions: find sed sort uniq
0

Useful for C projects where header file names must be unique (e.g. when using autoconf/automake), or when diagnosing if the wrong header file is being used (due to dupe file names)

spellcheck(){ typeset y=$@;curl -sd "<spellrequest><text>$y</text></spellrequest>" https://www.google.com/tbproxy/spell|sed -n '/s="[0-9]"/{s/<[^>]*>/ /g;s/\t/ /g;s/ *\(.*\)/Suggestions: \1\n/g;p}'|tee >(grep -Eq '.*'||echo -e "OK");}
2010-02-17 08:20:48
User: eightmillion
Functions: echo grep sed tee
5

I took matthewbauer's cool one-liner and rewrote it as a shell function that returns all the suggestions or outputs "OK" if it doesn't find anything wrong. It should work on ksh, zsh, and bash. Users that don't have tee can leave that part off like this:

spellcheck(){ typeset y=$@;curl -sd "<spellrequest><text>$y</text></spellrequest>" https://google.com/tbproxy/spell|sed -n '/s="[1-9]"/{s/<[^>]*>/ /g;s/\t/ /g;s/ *\(.*\)/Suggestions: \1\n/g;p}';}
spellcheck(){ curl -sd "<spellrequest><text>$1</text></spellrequest>" https://www.google.com/tbproxy/spell | sed 's/.*<spellresult [^>]*>\(.*\)<\/spellresult>/\1/;s/<c \([^>]*\)>\([^<]*\)<\/c>/\1;\2\n/g' | grep 's="1"' | sed 's/^.*;\([^\t]*\).*$/\1/'; }
ls *.jpg | grep -n "" | sed 's,.*,0000&,' | sed 's,0*\(...\):\(.*\).jpg,mv "\2.jpg" "image-\1.jpg",' | sh
curl -s -u $username:$password http://192.168.1.1/DHCPTable.htm | grep '<td>.* </td>' | sed 's|\t<td>\(.*\) </td>\r|\1|' | tr '\n' ';' | sed 's/\([^;]*\);\([^;]*\);/\2\t\1\n/g'
2010-02-16 02:27:11
User: matthewbauer
Functions: grep sed tr
0

Will create a sample etc host file based on your router's dhcp list.

Now I know this won't work on most routers, so please don't downvote it just because it doesn't work for you.

xmms2 list | sed -n -e '1i\0' -e 's/^.*(\([0-9]*\):\([0-9]*\))$/\1 60*\2++/gp' -e '$a\60op' | dc | sed -e 's/^ *//' -e 's/ /:/g'
xmms2 info $(xmms2 mlib search '<query>' | sed -ne 's/^00*\([1-9][0-9]*\).*$/\1/p') | awk -F' = ' '$1~/ url$/{print$2}'