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Commands using sed from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using sed - 1,069 results
for i in ~/Desktop/Personal/Wallpapers/*.jpg ; { size=$((`identify -format "%wx%h" $i | sed 's/x/*/'`)) ; if [[ $size -lt 800001 ]] then ; rm -f "$i" ; fi; }
2009-10-16 00:21:21
User: cbrinker
Functions: rm sed
0

For all of the jpgs in a directory, determine their size and if below a threshold remove them forcefully.

seq -w 100 | sed 's/^/login/'
2009-10-15 13:56:56
User: lawrence
Functions: sed seq
-4

This command generates a sequential login list. Good to be used as a source of new logins.

sed -n 5p <file>
2009-10-15 11:00:48
User: Waldirio
Functions: sed
37

You can get one specific line during any procedure. Very interesting to be used when you know what line you want.

seq 4|xargs -n1 -i bash -c "echo -n 164.85.216.{} - ; nslookup 164.85.216.{} |grep name"|tr -s ' ' ' '|awk '{print $1" - "$5}'|sed 's/.$//'
sed -e "$ ! s/$/,/"
2009-10-13 10:13:52
User: jgc
Functions: sed
4

In this simple example the command will add a comma to the end of every line except the last. I found this really useful when programatically constructing sql scripts. See sample output for example.

dpkg --get-selections | cut -f1 | while read pkg; do dpkg -L $pkg | xargs -I'{}' bash -c 'if [ ! -d "{}" ]; then echo "{}"; fi' | tr '\n' '\000' | du -c --files0-from - | tail -1 | sed "s/total/$pkg/"; done
2009-10-12 14:57:54
User: pykler
Functions: bash cut du echo read sed tail tr xargs
Tags: Debian wajig
4

Calculates the size on disk for each package installed on the filesystem (or removed but not purged). This is missing the

| sort -rn

which would put the biggest packges on top. That was purposely left out as the command is slightly on the slow side

Also you may need to run this as root as some files can only be checked by du if you can read them ;)

for f in *.html; do sed '$d' -i "$f"; done
2009-10-12 14:46:43
User: alperyilmaz
Functions: sed
1

sed can be used deleting the last line and with -i option, there's no need to for temp files, the change is made on the actual file

ifs () { echo -n "${IFS}"|hexdump -e '"" 10/1 "'\''%_c'\''\t" "\n"' -e '"" 10/1 "0x%02x\t" "\n\n"'|sed "s/''\|\t0x[^0-9]//g; $,/^$/d"
2009-10-10 22:41:35
User: dennisw
Functions: echo hexdump sed
2

You can display, save and restore the value of $IFS using conventional Bash commands, but these functions, which you can add to your ~/.bashrc file make it really easy.

To display $IFS use the function ifs shown above. In the sample output, you can see that it displays the characters and their hexadecimal equivalent.

This function saves it in a variable called $saveIFS:

sifs () { saveIFS=$IFS; }

Use this function to restore it

rifs () { IFS=$saveIFS; }

Add this line in your ~/.bashrc file to save a readonly copy of $IFS:

declare -r roIFS=$IFS

Use this function to restore that one to $IFS

rrifs () { IFS=$roIFS; }
find . -type d -print | sed -e 's;[^/]*/;..........;g'|awk '{print $0"-("NR-1")"}'
(printf "PERMISSIONS LINKS OWNER GROUP SIZE MONTH DAY HH:MM PROG-NAME\n" \ ; ls -l | sed 1d) | column -t
head -c4 /dev/urandom | od -N4 -tu4 | sed -ne '1s/.* //p'
sed -i '19375 s/^/#/' file
2009-10-07 17:50:40
User: TuxOtaku
Functions: sed
5

This will comment out a line, specified by line number, in a given file.

find . -iname ".project"| xargs -I {} dirname {} | LC_ALL=C xargs -I {} svn info {} | grep "Last Changed Rev\|Path" | sed "s/Last Changed Rev: /;/" | sed "s/Path: //" | sed '$!N;s/\n//'
2009-10-07 16:13:27
User: hurz
Functions: dirname find grep info sed xargs
0

Searches for all .project files in current folder and below and uses "svn info" to get the last changed revision. The last sed joins every two lines.

cvs -n update 2>null | grep -i "M " | sed s/"M "//
sqlite3 mydb.sqlite3 '.dump' | grep -vE '^(BEGIN|COMMIT|CREATE|DELETE)|"sqlite_sequence"' | sed -r 's/"([^"]+)"/`\1`/' | tee mydb.sql | mysql -p mydb
2009-10-02 14:40:51
User: mislav
Functions: grep sed tee
Tags: mysql sqlite dump
0

Filters out all non-insert SQL operations (we couldn't filter out only lines starting with "INSERT" because inserts can span multiple lines), quotes table names with backticks, saves dump to a file and pipes it straight to mysql.

This transfers only data--it expects your schema is already in place. In Ruby on Rails, you can easily recreate the schema in MySQL with "rake db:schema:load RAILS_ENV=production".

sh -c 'S=askapache R=htaccess; find . -mount -type f|xargs -P5 -iFF grep -l -m1 "$S" FF|xargs -P5 -iFF sed -i -e "s%${S}%${R}%g" FF'
9

I needed a way to search all files in a web directory that contained a certain string, and replace that string with another string. In the example, I am searching for "askapache" and replacing that string with "htaccess". I wanted this to happen as a cron job, and it was important that this happened as fast as possible while at the same time not hogging the CPU since the machine is a server.

So this script uses the nice command to run the sh shell with the command, which makes the whole thing run with priority 19, meaning it won't hog CPU processing. And the -P5 option to the xargs command means it will run 5 separate grep and sed processes simultaneously, so this is much much faster than running a single grep or sed. You may want to do -P0 which is unlimited if you aren't worried about too many processes or if you don't have to deal with process killers in the bg.

Also, the -m1 command to grep means stop grepping this file for matches after the first match, which also saves time.

s=124890; array=($(echo $s | sed 's/./& /g')); echo ${array[@]}; echo ${!array[@]}
2009-09-29 12:30:04
User: tatsu
Functions: echo sed
0

Convert string to array using echo and sed =)

dhclient -r && rm -f /var/lib/dhcp3/dhclient* && sed "s=$(hostname)=REPLACEME=g" -i /etc/hosts && hostname "$(echo $RANDOM | md5sum | cut -c 1-7 | tr a-z A-Z)" && sed "s=REPLACEME=$(hostname)=g" -i /etc/hosts && macchanger -e eth0 && dhclient
2009-09-28 22:07:31
User: syssyphus
Functions: hostname rm sed
Tags: privacy
7

this string of commands will release your dhcp address, change your mac address, generate a new random hostname and then get a new dhcp lease.

curl -s -c /tmp/cookie -k -u tivo:$MAK --digest "$(curl -s -c /tmp/cookie -k -u tivo:$MAK --digest https://$tivo/nowplaying/index.html | sed 's;.*<a href="\([^"]*\)">Download MPEG-PS</a>.*;\1;' | sed 's|\&amp;|\&|')" | tivodecode -m $MAK -- - > tivo.mpg
2009-09-26 03:00:46
User: matthewbauer
Functions: sed
0

Download the last show on your TiVo DVR.

Replace $MAK with your MAK see https://www3.tivo.com/tivo-mma/showmakey.do

Replace $tivo with your TiVo's IP

mysql -e 'show databases' | sed -n '2,$p' | xargs -I DB 'mysqldump DB > DB.sql'
2009-09-25 08:43:06
User: mislav
Functions: sed xargs
Tags: mysqldump
5

No need to loop when we have `xargs`. The sed command filters out the first line of `show databases` output, which is always "Database".

wget -q -O - 'http://wap.weather.gov.hk/' | sed -r 's/<[^>]+>//g;/^UV/q' | tail -n4
2009-09-25 02:36:46
User: dakunesu
Functions: sed tail wget
-1

"get Hong Kong weather infomation from HK Observatory

From Hong Kong Observatory wap site ;)"

other one showed alot of blank lines for me

wget -q -O - 'http://wap.weather.gov.hk/' | sed -r 's/<[^>]+>//g;/^UV/q' | grep -v '^$'
curl "http://www.house.gov/house/MemberWWW.shtml" 2>/dev/null | sed -e :a -e 's/<[^>]*>//g;/</N;//ba' | perl -nle 's/^\t\t(.*$)/ $1/ and print;'
2009-09-24 23:37:36
User: drewk
Functions: perl sed
Tags: perl sed curl
-1

Uses curl to download page of membership of US Congress. Use sed to strip HTML then perl to print a line starting with two tabs (a line with a representative)

find . -name "*.txt" -exec sed -i "s/old/new/" {} \;
sed '/^$/d' file >newfile