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Commands using sed from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using sed - 1,081 results
sed '/MARKER/{N;s/THIS/THAT/}'
2009-06-12 02:29:50
User: mungewell
Functions: sed
Tags: sed gnuplot
5

I've been auto-generating some complex GnuPlots; with multiplots the first plot of each group needs to be a 'plot' whereas the others need to be 'replots' to allow overplotting/autoscaling/etc to work properly.

This is used to replace only the first instance of 'replot'.

ldapsearch -H ldap://localhost:389 -D cn=username,ou=users,dc=domain -x -W -b ou=groups,dc=domain '(member=cn=username,ou=users,dc=domain)' | grep ^dn | sed "s/dn\: cn=\([^,]*\),ou=\([^,]*\),.*/\2 \1/"
2009-06-11 14:50:11
User: nitehawk
Functions: grep sed
-2

This expression looks for groups inside of a GroupOfNames class element, that is itself inside one (or many) Organizational Unit (ou) nodes in the ldap tree. Give you a quick dump of all the groups the user belongs to. Handy for displaying on a webpage.

find . -iname '*.jar' | xargs du -ks | cut -f1 | xargs echo | sed "s/ /+/g" | bc
sed -n -e '1,/match/p'
find /var/log -type f -exec file {} \; | grep 'text' | cut -d' ' -f1 | sed -e's/:$//g' | grep -v '[0-9]$' | xargs tail -f
2009-06-03 09:47:08
User: mohan43u
Functions: cut file find grep sed tail xargs
Tags: tail
5

Works in Ubuntu, I hope it will work on all Linux machines. For Unixes, tail should be capable of handling more than one file with '-f' option.

This command line simply take log files which are text files, and not ending with a number, and it will continuously monitor those files.

Putting one alias in .profile will be more useful.

lynx -source http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/random | sed 's/<[^>]*>//g' | head -1037 | tail -10 | sed -e 's/^[ \t]*//' | sed '/^$/d' | head -2
for i in `svn status | egrep '^(M|A)' | sed -r 's/\+\s+//' | awk '{ print $2 }'` ; do if [ ! -d $i ] ; then php -l $i ; fi ; done
2009-05-29 23:59:28
Functions: awk egrep sed
Tags: svn Linux PHP
0

Really only valuable in a PHP-only project directory. This is using standard linux versions of the tools. On most older BSD variants of sed, use -E instead of -r. Or use: sed 's/\+[[:space:]]\{1,\}//' instead.

ioreg -lw0 | grep IODisplayEDID | sed "/[^<]*</s///" | xxd -p -r | strings -6
find ./ -type f -exec sed -i 's/\t/ /g' {} \;
grep -PL "\t" -r . | grep -v ".svn" | xargs sed -i 's/\t/ /g'
2009-05-28 08:52:14
User: root
Functions: grep sed xargs
3

Note that this assumes the application is an SVN checkout and so we have to throw away all the .svn files before making the substitution.

season=1; for file in $(ls) ; do dir=$(echo $file | sed 's/.*S0$season\(E[0-9]\{2\}\).*/\1/'); mkdir $dir ; mv $file $dir; done
2009-05-27 03:30:58
User: lonecat
Functions: echo file mkdir mv sed
-1

It happened to me that I got a season of a tv-show which had all files under the same folder like /home/blah/tv_show/season1/file{1,2,3,4,5,...}.avi

But I like to have them like this:

/home/blah/tv_show/season1/e{1,2,3,4,5,...}/file{1,2,3,4,5,...}.avi

So I can have both the srt and the avi on one folder without cluttering much. This command organizes everything assuming that the filename contains Exx where xx is the number of the episode.

You may need to set:

IFS=$'\n'

if your filenames have spaces.

cal -y | tr '\n' '|' | sed "s/^/ /;s/$/ /;s/ $(date +%e) / $(date +%e | sed 's/./#/g') /$(date +%m | sed s/^0//)" | tr '|' '\n'
sed -e's/%\([0-9A-F][0-9A-F]\)/\\\\\x\1/g' | xargs echo -e
2009-05-25 05:37:44
User: mohan43u
Functions: echo sed xargs
10
echo "http%3A%2F%2Fwww.google.com" | sed -e's/%\([0-9A-F][0-9A-F]\)/\\\\\x\1/g' | xargs echo -e

http://www.google.com

Works under bash on linux. just alter the '-e' option to its corresponding equivalence in your system to execute escape characters correctly.

F="$HOME/.moz*/fire*/*/session*.js" ; grep -Go 'entries:\[[^]]*' $F | cut -d[ -f2 | while read A ; do echo $A | sed s/url:/\n/g | tail -1 | cut -d\" -f2; done
2009-05-21 21:58:42
User: b2e
Functions: cut echo grep read sed tail
3

Tuned for short command line - you can set the path to sessionstore.js more reliable instead of use asterixes etc.

Usable when you are not at home and really need to get your actual opened tabs on your home computer (via SSH). I am using it from my work if I forgot to bookmark some new interesting webpage, which I have visited at home. Also other way to list tabs when your firefox has crashed (restoring of tabs doesn't work always).

This script includes also tabs which has been closed short time before.

sed -i 'your sed stuff here' file
chkconfig --list | fgrep :on | sed -e 's/\(^.*\)*0:off/\1:/g' -e 's/\(.\):on/\1/g' -e 's/.:off//g' | tr -d [:blank:] | awk -F: '{print$2,$1}' | ssh host 'cat > foo'
2009-05-13 21:17:39
User: catawampus
2

And then to complete the task:

Go to target host;

ssh host

Turn everything off:

for i in `chkconfig --list | fgrep :on | awk '{print $1}'` ; do chkconfig --level 12345 $i off; done

Create duplicate config:

while read line; do chkconfig --level $line on; done < foo
for i in `seq -w 1600` ; do links -dump http://www.robsjokes.com/$i/index.html | sed '/Random Joke/,/Next Joke/!d' | sed '/^$/,/^$/!d' >> ~/temp/Rob.jokes ; echo '%' >> ~/temp/Rob.jokes ; done
for files in $(ls -A directory_name); do sed 's/search/replaced/g' $files > $files.new && mv $files.new $files; done;
2009-05-07 20:13:07
User: bassu
Functions: ls mv sed
-3

Yeah, there are many ways to do that.

Doing with sed by using a for loop is my favourite, because these are two basic things in all *nix environments. Sed by default does not allow to save the output in the same files so we'll use mv to do that in batch along with the sed.

expanded_script=$(eval "echo \"$(cat ${sed_script_file})\"") && sed -e "${expanded_script}" your_input_file
2009-05-07 14:21:14
Functions: eval sed
-1

With this command you can use shell variables inside sed scripts.

This is useful if the script MUST remain in an external file, otherwise you can simply use an inline -e argument to sed.

curl -s http://bash.org/?random1|grep -oE "<p class=\"quote\">.*</p>.*</p>"|grep -oE "<p class=\"qt.*?</p>"|sed -e 's/<\/p>/\n/g' -e 's/<p class=\"qt\">//g' -e 's/<p class=\"qt\">//g'|perl -ne 'use HTML::Entities;print decode_entities($_),"\n"'|head -1
2009-05-07 13:13:21
User: Iftah
Functions: grep head perl sed
7

bash.org is a collection of funny quotes from IRC.

WARNING: some of the quotes contain "adult" jokes... may be embarrassing if your boss sees them...

Thanks to Chen for the idea and initial version!

This script downloads a page with random quotes, filters the html to retrieve just one liners quotes and outputs the first one.

Just barely under the required 255 chars :)

Improvment:

You can replace the head -1 at the end by:

awk 'length($0)>0 {printf( $0 "\n%%\n" )}' > bash_quotes.txt

which will separate the quotes with a "%" and place it in the file.

and then:

strfile bash_quotes.txt

which will make the file ready for the fortune command

and then you can:

fortune bash_quotes.txt

which will give you a random quote from those in the downloaded file.

I download a file periodically and then use the fortune in .bashrc so I see a funny quote every time I open a terminal.

sed -i '/Centos/d' VirtualBox.xml
2009-05-05 13:03:55
Functions: sed
-3

Simple but useful command, I use this for purge an hard disk entry in Virtualbox registry file (is in ~user/.Virtualbox) that persist if I erase a Virtual Machine, so I need to delete it manually.

lynx -dump randomfunfacts.com | grep -A 3 U | sed 1D
2009-05-05 07:52:10
User: xizdaqrian
Functions: grep sed
0

This is a working version, though probably clumsy, of the script submitted by felix001. This works on ubuntu and CygWin. This would be great as a bash function, defined in .bashrc. Additionally it would work as a script put in the path.

wget -q -O- http://www.gutenberg.org/dirs/etext96/cprfd10.txt | sed '1,419d' | tr "\n" " " | tr " " "\n" | perl -lpe 's/\W//g;$_=lc($_)' | grep "^[a-z]" | awk 'length > 1' | sort | uniq -c | awk '{print $2"\t"$1}'
2009-05-04 16:00:39
User: alperyilmaz
Functions: awk grep perl sed sort tr uniq wget
-4

This command might not be useful for most of us, I just wanted to share it to show power of command line.

Download simple text version of novel David Copperfield from Poject Gutenberg and then generate a single column of words after which occurences of each word is counted by sort | uniq -c combination.

This command removes numbers and single characters from count. I'm sure you can write a shorter version.

sed G
2009-05-02 12:11:40
Functions: sed
-1

G option cause a file to be spacing line by line.

p=$(netstat -nate 2>/dev/null | awk '/LISTEN/ {gsub (/.*:/, "", $4); if ($4 == "4444") {print $8}}'); for i in $(ls /proc/|grep "^[1-9]"); do [[ $(ls -l /proc/$i/fd/|grep socket|sed -e 's|.*\[\(.*\)\]|\1|'|grep $p) ]] && cat /proc/$i/cmdline && echo; done
2009-04-30 12:39:48
User: j0rn
Functions: awk cat grep ls netstat sed
-5

Ok so it's rellay useless line and I sorry for that, furthermore that's nothing optimized at all...

At the beginning I didn't managed by using netstat -p to print out which process was handling that open port 4444, I realize at the end I was not root and security restrictions applied ;p

It's nevertheless a (good ?) way to see how ps(tree) works, as it acts exactly the same way by reading in /proc

So for a specific port, this line returns the calling command line of every thread that handle the associated socket