Hide

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again.

Delete that bloated snippets file you've been using and share your personal repository with the world. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.


If you have a new feature suggestion or find a bug, please get in touch via http://commandlinefu.uservoice.com/

Get involved!

You can sign-in using OpenID credentials, or register a traditional username and password.

First-time OpenID users will be automatically assigned a username which can be changed after signing in.

Universal configuration monitoring and system of record for IT.
Hide

Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for:

Hide

News

May 19, 2015 - A Look At The New Commandlinefu
I've put together a short writeup on what kind of newness you can expect from the next iteration of clfu. Check it out here.
March 2, 2015 - New Management
I'm Jon, I'll be maintaining and improving clfu. Thanks to David for building such a great resource!
Hide

Top Tags

Hide

Functions

Hide

Credits

Commands using sort from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using sort - 651 results
du -cs * .[^\.]* | sort -n
2009-03-02 18:43:48
User: cemsbr
Functions: du sort
9

Very useful when you need disk space. It calculates the disk usage of all files and dirs (descending them) located at the current directory (including hidden ones). Then sort puts them in order.

sort -nt . -k 1,1 -k 2,2 -k 3,3 -k 4,4
2009-02-26 20:22:57
User: sysadmn
Functions: sort
14

Sort a list of IPV4 addresses in numerical order. Great as a filter, or within vim using !}

sort -bdf
2009-02-26 19:55:41
User: sysadmn
Functions: sort
2

Often, when sorting you want the sort to ignore extraneous characters. The b, d, and f tell sort to ignore leading blanks, use 'dictionary order' (ignore punctuation), and ignore (fold) case. Add a "u" if you only want one copy of duplicate lines.

This is a great command to use within vim to sort lines of text, using !}sort -bdf

du --max-depth=1 | sort -r -n | awk '{split("k m g",v); s=1; while($1>1024){$1/=1024; s++} print int($1)" "v[s]"\t"$2}'
2009-02-24 11:03:08
User: hans
Functions: awk du sort
16

I use this on debian testing, works like the other sorted du variants, but i like small numbers and suffixes :)

find . -type d | perl -nle 'print s,/,/,g," $_"' | sort -n | tail
find . -type f -name "*.java" -print0 | xargs -0 -n 1 svn blame | sed -n 's/^[^a-z]*\([a-z]*\).*$/\1/p' | sort | uniq -c | sort -n
sed -e "s/| /\n/g" ~/.bash_history | cut -d ' ' -f 1 | sort | uniq -c | sort -nr | head
"some line input" | sort | uniq -c | sort -nr
sed 's/[ \t]*$//' < emails.txt | tr 'A-Z' 'a-z' | sort | uniq > emails_sorted.txt
du -b --max-depth 1 | sort -nr | perl -pe 's{([0-9]+)}{sprintf "%.1f%s", $1>=2**30? ($1/2**30, "G"): $1>=2**20? ($1/2**20, "M"): $1>=2**10? ($1/2**10, "K"): ($1, "")}e'
comm -1 -2 <(sort file1) <(sort file2)
cat foo.csv bar.csv | sort -t "," -k 2 | uniq
2009-02-19 20:23:03
User: rafeco
Functions: cat sort
2

The value for the sort command's -k argument is the column in the CSV file to sort on. In this example, it sorts on the second column. You must use some form of the sort command in order for uniq to work properly.

lsof | awk '{print $1}' | sort | uniq -c | sort -rn | head
sed -n -e '/postfix\/smtp\[.*status=sent/s/^.*to=<\([^>]*\).*$/\1/p' /var/log/mail.log | sort -u
netstat -alpn | grep :80 | awk '{print $4}' |awk -F: '{print $(NF-1)}' |sort | uniq -c | sort -n
last | grep -v "^$" | awk '{ print $1 }' | sort -nr | uniq -c
2009-02-18 16:38:59
User: hkyeakley
Functions: awk grep last sort uniq
15

This command takes the output of the 'last' command, removes empty lines, gets just the first field ($USERNAME), sort the $USERNAMES in reverse order and then gives a summary count of unique matches.

diff <(sort file1.txt) <(sort file2.txt)
2009-02-18 15:17:59
Functions: diff sort
4

Sees if two records differ in their entries, irrespective of order.

history | awk '{print $2}' | sort | uniq -c | sort -rn | head
egrep -o '\b[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\b' access.log | sort -u
find path/to/folder/ -type f -print0 | xargs -0 -n 1 md5sum | awk '{print $1}' | sort | md5sum | awk '{print $1}'
2009-02-16 19:39:37
User: mcover
Functions: awk find md5sum sort xargs
-2

For quick validation of folder's file-contents (structure not taken into account) - I use it mostly to check if two folders' contents are the same.

netstat -ntu | awk '{print $5}' | cut -d: -f1 | sort | uniq -c | sort -n | tail
2009-02-16 15:48:27
User: TuxOtaku
Functions: awk cut netstat sort uniq
2

This command does a tally of concurrent active connections from single IPs and prints out those IPs that have the most active concurrent connections. VERY useful in determining the source of a DoS or DDoS attack.

ps -eo pcpu,pid,args | sort -n
2009-02-16 14:23:03
Functions: ps sort
3

Useful to detect which process is causing system loads. It shows process PID so as we can take further actions.

du -ks * | sort -n
2009-02-16 14:18:52
Functions: du sort
-1

Very useful for finding the largest files and subdirectories at any given point. Any user can run it from current location just when need to know their largest files and subtdirectories from a certain point down as well.

netstat -anl | grep :80 | awk '{print $5}' | cut -d ":" -f 1 | uniq -c | sort -n | grep -c IPHERE
2009-02-16 08:54:08
User: nullrouter
Functions: awk cut grep netstat sort uniq
3

This will tell you who has the most Apache connections by IP (replace IPHERE with the actual IP you wish to check). Or if you wish, remove | grep -c IPHERE for the full list.

netstat -pant 2> /dev/null | grep SYN_ | awk '{print $5;}' | cut -d: -f1 | sort | uniq -c | sort -n | tail -20
2009-02-16 08:49:38
3

List top 20 IP from which TCP connection is in SYN_RECV state.

Useful on web servers to detect a syn flood attack.

Replace SYN_ with ESTA to find established connections