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May 19, 2015 - A Look At The New Commandlinefu
I've put together a short writeup on what kind of newness you can expect from the next iteration of clfu. Check it out here.
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Psst. Open beta.

Wow, didn't really expect you to read this far down. The latest iteration of the site is in open beta. It's a gentle open beta-- not in prime-time just yet. It's being hosted over at UpGuard (link) and you are more than welcome to give it a shot. Couple things:

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Your feedback is appreciated via the form on the beta page. Thanks! -Jon & CLFU Team

Commands using sort from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using sort - 668 results
find . -type d | while read dir ; do num=`ls -l $dir | grep '^-' | wc -l` ; echo "$num $dir" ; done | sort -rnk1 | head
find . -type f -printf "%T@ %Tc %p\n" |sort -n |cut -d' ' -f2- |tail -n20
du . | sort -nr | awk '{split("KB MB GB TB", arr); idx=1; while ( $1 > 1024 ) { $1/=1024; idx++} printf "%10.2f",$1; print " " arr[idx] "\t" $2}' | head -25
2012-12-03 02:59:13
User: agas
Functions: awk du head printf sort
0

Lists the size in human readable form and lists the top 25 biggest directories/files

tail -1000 `ls -ltr /var/log/CF* |tail -1|awk '{print $9}'`|cut -d "," -f 17|sort|uniq -c |sort -k2
2012-11-30 16:30:41
User: raindylong
Functions: awk cut sort tail uniq
0

count & sort one field of the log files , such as nginx/apache access log files .

du -hd1 |sort -h
pacman -Qi | grep 'Name\|Size\|Description' | cut -d: -f2 | paste - - - | awk -F'\t' '{ print $2, "\t", $1, "\t", $3 }' | sort -rn
2012-11-20 03:40:55
Functions: awk cut grep paste sort
0

This, like the other commands listed here, displays installed arch packages. Unlike the other ones this also displays the short description so you can see what that package does without having to go to google. It also shows the largest packages on top. You can optionally pipe this through head to display an arbitrary number of the largest packages installed (e.g. ... | head -30 # for the largest 30 packages installed)

find . -type f |egrep '^./.*\.' |sed -e "s/\(^.*\.\)\(.*$\)/\2/" |sort |uniq
2012-11-12 17:17:55
User: dvst
Functions: egrep find sed sort
0

find files recursively from the current directory, and list the extensions of files uniquely

find . -type f -print | awk -F'.' '{print $NF}' | sort | uniq -c
MP3TAG_DECODE_UTF8=0 mp3info2 -p "%a - %l\n" -R . | sort | uniq
for k in `git branch -r|awk '{print $1}'`;do echo -e `git show --pretty=format:"%Cgreen%ci_%C(blue)%c r_%Cred%cn_%Creset" $k|head -n 1`$k;done|sort -r|awk -F"_" '{printf("%s %17s %-22s %s\n",$1,$2,$3,$4)}'
ls /var/log/sa/sa[0-9]*|xargs -I '{}' sar -u -f {}|awk '/^[0-9]/&&!/^12:00:01|RESTART|CPU/{print "%user: "$4" %system: "$6" %iowait: "$7" %nice: "$5" %idle: "$9}'|sort -nk10|head
for i in $(ps -eo pid|grep -v PID);do echo ""; echo -n "==$i== ";awk '/^read|^write/{ORS=" "; print}' /proc/$i/io 2>/dev/null; echo -n " ==$i=="; done|sort -nrk5|awk '{printf "%s\n%s %s\n%s %s\n%s\n\n",$1,$2,$3,$4,$5,$6}'
find /test -type f -printf "%AY%Aj%AH%AM%AS---%h/%f\n" | sort -n
tshark -qr [cap] -z conv,tcp | awk '{printf("%s:%s:%s\n",$1,$3,$10)}' | awk -F: '{printf("%s %s %s\n",$1,$3,substr($5,1,length($5)-10))}' | sort | uniq -c | sort -nr
ps axo %mem,pid,euser,cmd | sort -nr | head -n 10
du -sm /home/* | sort -n | tail -10
for i in $(seq 1 100 | sort -R); do echo $i; sleep 5; done
2012-09-25 17:47:32
Functions: echo seq sleep sort
3

Random choose numbers from 1 to 100 with 5 seconds interval without duplicates.

find . \( -iname '*.cpp' -o -iname '*.h' \) -exec wc -l {} \; | sort -n | cut --delimiter=. -f 1 | awk '{s+=$1} END {print s}'
2012-09-19 15:21:01
User: jecxjoopenid
Functions: awk cut find sort wc
0

Searches for *.cpp and *.h in directory structure, counts the number of lines for each matching file and adds the counts together.

sudo -s du -sm /Users/* | sort -nr | head -n 10
2012-09-13 10:15:23
User: mematron
Functions: du head sort sudo
1

In OSX you would have to make sure that you "sudo -s" your way to happiness since it will give a few "Permission denied" errors before finally spitting out the results. In OSX the directory structure has to start with the "Users" Directory then it will recursively perform the operation.

Your Lord and master,

Mematron

du -sh /home/*|sort -rh|head -n 10
2012-09-12 11:54:06
User: toaster
Functions: du head sort
0

the -h option of du and sort (on appropriate distrib) makes output "Human" readable and still sorted by "reversed size" (sort -rh)

sudo lastb | awk '{if ($3 ~ /([[:digit:]]{1,3}\.){3}[[:digit:]]{1,3}/)a[$3] = a[$3]+1} END {for (i in a){print i " : " a[i]}}' | sort -nk 3
2012-09-11 14:51:10
User: sgowie
Functions: awk lastb sort sudo
1

The lastb command presents you with the history of failed login attempts (stored in /var/log/btmp). The reference file is read/write by root only by default. This can be quite an exhaustive list with lots of bots hammering away at your machine. Sometimes it is more important to see the scale of things, or in this case the volume of failed logins tied to each source IP.

The awk statement determines if the 3rd element is an IP address, and if so increments the running count of failed login attempts associated with it. When done it prints the IP and count.

The sort statement sorts numerically (-n) by column 3 (-k 3), so you can see the most aggressive sources of login attempts. Note that the ':' character is the 2nd column, and that the -n and -k can be combined to -nk.

Please be aware that the btmp file will contain every instance of a failed login unless explicitly rolled over. It should be safe to delete/archive this file after you've processed it.

du -sm /home/* | sort -nr | head -n 10
cut -c23-37 /var/log/squid3/access.log | cut -d' ' -f1 | sort | uniq
2012-09-07 14:57:26
User: dan
Functions: cut sort
Tags: squid webproxy
3

Generates the list of clients (IPs addresses) that have used the Squid webproxy according to the most recent log. Every IP appears only once in the list.

sed -n -e "/^\[/h; /priority *=/{ G; s/\n/ /; s/ity=/ity = /; p }" /etc/yum.repos.d/*.repo | sort -k3n
2012-09-06 00:09:09
User: eddieb
Functions: sed sort
0

This probably only works without modifications in RHEL/CentOS/Fedora.

grep -H voluntary_ctxt /proc/*/status |gawk '{ split($1,proc,"/"); if ( $2 > 10000000 ) { printf $2 " - Process : "; system("ps h -o cmd -p "proc[3]) } }' | sort -nk1,1 | sed 's/^/Context Switches: /g'
2012-09-01 19:43:47
User: jperkster
Functions: gawk grep printf sed sort
0

This command will find the highest context switches on a server and give you the process listing.