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Commands using sort from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using sort - 608 results
compgen -c | sort -u > commands && less commands
for a in $(find . -xdev -type f -printf '%i\n'|sort|uniq -d);do find . -xdev -inum $a -printf '%s %i %m %n %U %G %AD %Ar %p\n';done|sort -n|awk '{if(x!=$2){print "---"};x=$2;print $0}'
2012-04-09 12:52:07
User: knoppix5
Functions: awk find sort uniq
0

The listing will be nice separated with dashes in chunks of identical files.

Output format:

Size Inode Mode Count_of_identical_files UID GID Date Time Path/Filename

for k in $(git branch | sed /\*/d); do echo "$(git log -1 --pretty=format:"%ct" $k) $k"; done | sort -r | awk '{print $2}'
2012-04-07 11:19:00
User: dahuie
Functions: awk echo sed sort
Tags: bash git sed awk
0

Simpler and without all of the coloring gimmicks. This just returns a list of branches with the most recent first. This should be useful for cleaning your remotes.

find . -type f -print0 | xargs -0 -n1 md5sum | sort -k 1,32 | uniq -w 32 -d --all-repeated=separate | sed -e 's/^[0-9a-f]*\ *//;'
history | awk '{print $2}' | awk 'BEGIN {FS="|"}{print $1}' | sort | uniq -c | sort -nr | head
find /some/path -type f -and -printf "%f\n" | egrep -io '\.[^.]*$' | sort | uniq -c | sort -rn
2012-04-02 19:25:35
User: kyle0r
Functions: egrep find sort uniq
Tags: uniq ls grep
0

the

find -printf "%f\n" prints just the file name from the given path. This means directory paths which contain extensions will not be considered.
for a in $(< FILENAME); do echo "$(bc <<< $(wc -m<<<$a)-1) $a";done|sort -n
find . -type f -print0 | xargs -0 du -h | sort -hr | head -20
2012-03-30 10:21:12
User: flatcap
Functions: du find head sort xargs
7

Search for files and list the 20 largest.

find . -type f

gives us a list of file, recursively, starting from here (.)

-print0 | xargs -0 du -h

separate the names of files with NULL characters, so we're not confused by spaces

then xargs run the du command to find their size (in human-readable form -- 64M not 64123456)

| sort -hr

use sort to arrange the list in size order. sort -h knows that 1M is bigger than 9K

| head -20

finally only select the top twenty out of the list

find . -mount -type f -printf "%k %p\n" | sort -rg | cut -d \ -f 2- | xargs -I {} du -sh {} | less
scanelf --nobanner --recursive --quiet --needed --format "+n#F" $1 | tr ',' '\n' | sort -u
2012-03-29 18:30:45
User: Flameeyes
Functions: sort tr
1

This works in combination with http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/10496/identify-exported-sonames-in-a-path as it reports the NEEDED entries present in the files within a given path. You can then compare it with the libraries that are exported to make sure that, when cross-building a firmware image, you're not bringing in dependencies from the build host.

The short version of it as can be seen in the same output is

scanelf -RBnq -F "+n#f" $1 | tr ',' '\n' | sort -u
ps aux | awk '$11!~/\[*\]/ {print $6/1024" Mb --> "$11,$12,$13,$14}' | sort -g
2012-03-23 20:59:33
User: dererk
Functions: awk ps sort
2

Works on most unixes, on OpenBSD replace the "-g" parameter at the sort with a "-n".

for w in $(tr 'A-Z ,."()?!;:' 'a-z\n' < sample.txt); do echo ${#w} $w; done | sort -u | sort -n
2012-03-15 14:14:11
User: flatcap
Functions: echo sort tr
Tags: bash sort tr
0

Take a file and ,."()?!;: give a list of all the words in order of increasing length.

First of all use tr to map all alphabetic characters to lower case and also strip out any puntuation.

A-Z become a-z

,."()?!;: all become \n (newline)

I've ignored - (hyphen) and ' (apostrophe) because they occur in words.

Next use bash to print the length ${#w} and the word

Finally sort the list numerically (sort -n) and remove any duplicates (sort -u).

Note: sort -nu performs strangely on this list. It outputs one word per length.

for a in $(cat sample.txt); do echo "${#a} $a";done|sort -n
du -s $(ls -l | grep '^d' | awk '{print $9}') | sort -nr
for a in $(cat sample.txt); do echo "$(wc -m<<<$a) $a";done|sort -n
2012-03-15 08:51:42
User: knoppix5
Functions: cat echo sort
0

optionally you can add

|cut -d' ' -f2|uniq

to the end of the command line.

ls | grep -i mp3 | sort -R | sed -e 's/.*/"&"/' | xargs mpg123
2012-03-10 20:51:36
User: retrodanny
Functions: grep ls sed sort xargs
2

* grep -i leaves only mp3 files (case insentitive)

* sort -R randomizes list (may use GNU 'shuf' instead).

* the sed command will add double quotes around each filename (needed if odd characters are present)

head -n1 nation.tbl | sed 's/\(.\)/\1\n/g' | sort | uniq -c | grep \| | awk '{ print $1 }'
find <directory> -type f -printf "%T@\t%p\n"|sort -n|cut -f2|xargs ls -lrt
ls -ltr --directory $(find . -regex "./.*[^/]*\'" -type f | xargs -n 1 dirname | sort | uniq)
2012-03-02 03:48:47
User: pdkl95
Functions: dirname find ls sort xargs
0

This let me find some a set of modifications that were made to a rather large tree of files, where the file-names themselves were not unique (actually: insanely redundant and useless. "1.dat 2.dat ..."). Pruning down to last-branch brough things back to the "project-name" scope, and it's then easy to see which branches of the tree have recently changed, or any other similar search.

Ideally, it should sort the directories by the mtime of the most recent *file* *inside* the directory, but that's probably outside the scope of a (sane...) command line.

cat z.log | cut -d ':' -f1 | sort | uniq | xargs -l1 -iFF echo 'echo FF $(cat z.log | grep -e "^FF" | grep -e Timeout | wc -l )' | bash
cat z.log | grep Timeout | cut -d ':' -f1 | sort | uniq -c
sed -e 's/[;|][[:space:]]*/\n/g' .bash_history | cut --delimiter=' ' --fields=1 | sort | uniq --count | sort --numeric-sort --reverse | head --lines=20
for i in $(ps -eo pid,pmem,pcpu| sort -k 3 -r|grep -v PID|head -10|awk '{print $1}');do diff -yw <(pidstat -p $i|grep -v Linux) <(ps -o euser,pri,psr,pmem,stat -p $i|tail);done
2012-02-16 20:54:32
Functions: awk diff grep head ps sort
0

It grabs the PID's top resource users with $(ps -eo pid,pmem,pcpu| sort -k 3 -r|grep -v PID|head -10)

The sort -k is sorting by the third field which would be CPU. Change this to 2 and it will sort accordingly.

The rest of the command is just using diff to display the output of 2 commands side-by-side (-y flag) I chose some good ones for ps.

pidstat comes with the sysstat package(sar, mpstat, iostat, pidstat) so if you don't have it, you should.

I might should take off the timestamp... :|

find . -size +10240k -exec stat -c%s" "%n {} \; | sort -rn
du -k | sort -n | perl -ne 'if ( /^(\d+)\s+(.*$)/){$l=log($1+.1);$m=int($l/log(1024)); printf ("%6.1f\t%s\t%25s %s\n",($1/(2**(10*$m))),(("K","M","G","T","P")[$m]),"*"x (1.5*$l),$2);}' | more
2012-02-07 15:49:19
User: Q_Element
Functions: du perl printf sort
0

This one line Perl script will display the smallest to the largest files sizes in all directories on a server.