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Commands using sort from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using sort - 639 results
netstat -atn | awk ' /tcp/ {printf("%s\n",substr($4,index($4,":")+1,length($4) )) }' | sed -e "s/://g" | sort -rnu | awk '{array [$1] = $1} END {i=32768; again=1; while (again == 1) {if (array[i] == i) {i=i+1} else {print i; again=0}}}'
2009-03-27 20:38:43
User: mpb
Functions: awk netstat sed sort
4

Some commands (such as netcat) have a port option but how can you know which ports are unused?

cat file.txt | sort | uniq -dc
2009-03-21 18:15:14
User: Vadi
Functions: cat sort uniq
1

Displays the duplicated lines in a file and their occuring frequency.

ls -l | sort -nk5
rpm -qa --qf '%{SIZE} %{NAME}\n' | sort -nr | nl | head -6 # six largest RPMs
2009-03-15 22:18:17
User: mpb
Functions: head nl rpm sort
2

Low on disk space? Check the largest installed RPMs for delete canditates.

sort file1.txt | uniq > file2.txt
ls -l|awk '{print $6,$8}'|sort -d
2009-03-13 19:00:18
User: archlich
Functions: awk ls sort
-4

Can pipe to tail or change the awk for for file size, groups, users, etc.

grep Mar/2009 /var/log/apache2/access.log | awk '{ print $1 }' | sort -n | uniq -c | sort -rn | head
cat $(ls -tr | tail -1) | awk '{ a[$1] += 1; } END { for(i in a) printf("%d, %s\n", a[i], i ); }' | sort -n | tail -25
2009-03-06 17:50:29
User: oremj
Functions: awk cat ls sort tail
7

This command is much quicker than the alternative of "sort | uniq -c | sort -n".

find . -type f -print0 | xargs -r0 stat -c %Y\ %n | sort -rn | gawk '{sub(/.\//,"",$2); print $2}' > /tmp/playlist.m3u
2009-03-04 16:41:02
User: microft
Functions: find gawk sort stat xargs
3

I use this to generate a playlist with all the podcasts I listen to.

Ordered from most recent to older.

du | sort -n | tail -11 | head
2009-03-04 16:06:34
User: phage
Functions: du sort tail
-3

The pipe to head removes the listing of . as the largest directory.

zgrep "Failed password" /var/log/auth.log* | awk '{print $9}' | sort | uniq -c | sort -nr | less
2009-03-03 13:45:56
User: dbart
Functions: awk sort uniq zgrep
8

This command checks for the number of times when someone has tried to login to your server and failed. If there are a lot, then that user is being targeted on your system and you might want to make sure that user either has remote logins disabled, or has a strong password, or both. If your output has an "invalid" line, it is a summary of all logins from users that don't exist on your system.

gunzip -c /var/log/auth.log.*.gz | cat - /var/log/auth.log /var/log/auth.log.0 | grep "Invalid user" | awk '{print $8;}' | sort | uniq -c | less
du -cs * .[^\.]* | sort -n
2009-03-02 18:43:48
User: cemsbr
Functions: du sort
9

Very useful when you need disk space. It calculates the disk usage of all files and dirs (descending them) located at the current directory (including hidden ones). Then sort puts them in order.

sort -nt . -k 1,1 -k 2,2 -k 3,3 -k 4,4
2009-02-26 20:22:57
User: sysadmn
Functions: sort
14

Sort a list of IPV4 addresses in numerical order. Great as a filter, or within vim using !}

sort -bdf
2009-02-26 19:55:41
User: sysadmn
Functions: sort
2

Often, when sorting you want the sort to ignore extraneous characters. The b, d, and f tell sort to ignore leading blanks, use 'dictionary order' (ignore punctuation), and ignore (fold) case. Add a "u" if you only want one copy of duplicate lines.

This is a great command to use within vim to sort lines of text, using !}sort -bdf

du --max-depth=1 | sort -r -n | awk '{split("k m g",v); s=1; while($1>1024){$1/=1024; s++} print int($1)" "v[s]"\t"$2}'
2009-02-24 11:03:08
User: hans
Functions: awk du sort
16

I use this on debian testing, works like the other sorted du variants, but i like small numbers and suffixes :)

find . -type d | perl -nle 'print s,/,/,g," $_"' | sort -n | tail
find . -type f -name "*.java" -print0 | xargs -0 -n 1 svn blame | sed -n 's/^[^a-z]*\([a-z]*\).*$/\1/p' | sort | uniq -c | sort -n
sed -e "s/| /\n/g" ~/.bash_history | cut -d ' ' -f 1 | sort | uniq -c | sort -nr | head
"some line input" | sort | uniq -c | sort -nr
sed 's/[ \t]*$//' < emails.txt | tr 'A-Z' 'a-z' | sort | uniq > emails_sorted.txt
du -b --max-depth 1 | sort -nr | perl -pe 's{([0-9]+)}{sprintf "%.1f%s", $1>=2**30? ($1/2**30, "G"): $1>=2**20? ($1/2**20, "M"): $1>=2**10? ($1/2**10, "K"): ($1, "")}e'
comm -1 -2 <(sort file1) <(sort file2)
cat foo.csv bar.csv | sort -t "," -k 2 | uniq
2009-02-19 20:23:03
User: rafeco
Functions: cat sort
2

The value for the sort command's -k argument is the column in the CSV file to sort on. In this example, it sorts on the second column. You must use some form of the sort command in order for uniq to work properly.