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Commands using ssh from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using ssh - 286 results
ssh [user]@[host] "ogg123 -" < [podcast].ogg
ssh [user]@[address] "mpg321 -" < [file].mp3
2010-07-30 00:23:13
User: leovailati
Functions: ssh
6

This one doesn't need to convert to wav.

sox Klaxon.mp3 -t wav - |ssh thelab@company.com paplay
2010-07-29 23:23:39
User: camocrazed
Functions: ssh
7

This will allow you to convert an audio file to wav format, and send it via ssh to a player on the other computer, which will open and play it there. Of course, substitute your information for the sound file and remote address

You do not have to use paplay on the remote end, as it is a PulseAudio thing. If the remote end uses ALSA, you should use aplay instead. If it uses OSS, you should berate them about having a lousy sound system. Also, you're not limited to transmitting encoded as wav either, it's just that AFAIK, most systems don't come with mp3 codecs, but will play wav files fine.

If you know SoX is installed on the remote end and has mp3 codecs, you can use the following instead:

cat Klaxon.mp3 |ssh thelab@company.com play -t mp3 -

this will transmit as mp3. Again, use your specific information. if you're not playing mp3s, use another type with the -t option

ssh -C -Y -l$USER xserver.mynet.xx 'Xnest -geometry 1900x1150 -query localhost'
ssh-keygen -f ~/.ssh/id_rsa -p
2010-07-19 12:53:35
User: darkfader
Functions: ssh ssh-keygen
3

Protects your secret identity with a passphrase.

OSX 10.6 automatically does key forwarding and can store the passphrase in the keychain.

For other OSes, use ssh -A or set ForwardAgent in ssh_config to enable forwarding. Then use ssh-agent/ssh-add.

for host in host1 host2 host3; do ssh -n user@$host <command> > $host.log & done; wait
2010-07-14 14:55:31
User: cout
Functions: host ssh
1

Ssh to host1, host2, and host3, executing on each host and saving the output in {host}.log.

I don't have the 'parallel' command installed, otherwise it sounds interesting and less cryptic.

ssh-keygen -R <the_offending_host>
2010-07-11 19:37:24
User: bunam
Functions: ssh ssh-keygen
Tags: sed
42

In this case it's better do to use the dedicated tool

dd if=/dev/zero bs=4096 count=1048576 | ssh user@host.tld 'cat > /dev/null'
2010-06-08 18:49:51
User: atoponce
Functions: dd ssh
Tags: ssh dd
5

The above command will send 4GB of data from one host to the next over the network, without consuming any unnecessary disk on either the client nor the host. This is a quick and dirty way to benchmark network speed without wasting any time or disk space.

Of course, change the byte size and count as necessary.

This command also doesn't rely on any extra 3rd party utilities, as dd, ssh, cat, /dev/zero and /dev/null are installed on all major Unix-like operating systems.

ssh host -l user $(<cmd.txt)
2010-06-04 17:47:00
User: recursiverse
Functions: host ssh
30

Much simpler method. More portable version: ssh host -l user "`cat cmd.txt`"

perl -e 'system @ARGV, <STDIN>' ssh host -l user < cmd.txt
2010-06-04 17:27:20
User: recursiverse
Functions: host perl ssh
0

I was tired of the endless quoting, unquoting, re-quoting, and escaping characters that left me with working, but barely comprehensible shell one-liners. It can be really frustrating, especially if the local and remote shells differ and have their own escaping and quoting rules. I decided to try a different approach and ended up with this.

ssh -fY user@REMOTESERVER firefox -no-remote
2010-06-03 07:24:07
User: KoRoVaMiLK
Functions: ssh
5

Actually 'firefox' is a script that then launches the 'firefox-bin' executable. You need to specify the 'no-remote' option in order to launch remote firefox instead of your local one (this drove me crazy time ago)

mysqldump -q --skip-opt --force --log-error=dbname_error.log -uroot -pmysqlpassword dbname | ssh -C user@sshserver 'cd /path/to/backup/dir; cat > dbname.sql'
2010-05-29 23:06:04
User: esplinter
Functions: cat ssh
9

backup big mysql db to remote machine over ssh. "--skip-opt" option is needed when you can?t allocate full database in ram.

echo 'Host or User@Host?:'; read newserver && ssh-keygen -N "" -t rsa -f ~/.ssh/id_rsa ; ssh $newserver cat <~/.ssh/id_rsa.pub ">>" ~/.ssh/authorized_keys ; ssh $newserver
2010-05-07 06:24:53
User: alf
Functions: cat echo read ssh ssh-keygen
Tags: ssh ssh-keygen
-2

Some servers don't have ssh-copy-id, this works in those cases.

It will ask for the destination server, this can be IP, hostname, or user@hostname if different from current user.

Ssh keygen will let you know if a pubkey already exists on your system and you can opt to not overwrite it.

xterm -display :12.0 -e ssh -X user@server &
2010-04-22 10:29:24
User: vishalce
Functions: ssh
8

First of all you need to run this command.

X :12.0 vt12 2>&1 >/dev/null &

This command will open a X session on 12th console. And it will show you blank screen. Now press Alt + Ctrl + F7. You will get your original screen.

Now run given command "xterm -display :12.0 -e ssh -X user@remotesystem &". After this press Alt + Ctrl + F12. You will get a screen which will ask you for password for remote linux system. And after it you are done. You can open any window based application of remote system on your desktop.

Press Alt + Ctrl + F7 for getting original screen.

ssh user@<source_host> -- tar cz <path> | ssh user@<destination_host> -- tar vxzC <path>
ssh root@host1 "cd /somedir/tocopy/ && tar -cf - ." | ssh root@host2 "cd /samedir/tocopyto/ && tar -xf -"
2010-04-16 06:48:47
User: peshay
Functions: ssh
15

Good if only you have access to host1 and host2, but they have no access to your host (so ncat won't work) and they have no direct access to each other.

ssh -o UserKnownHostsFile=/dev/null root@192.168.1.1
2010-04-08 14:55:58
User: oernii2
Functions: ssh
Tags: ssh
8

you may create an alias also, which I did ;-)

alias sshu="ssh -o UserKnownHostsFile=/dev/null "

ssh -t server 'cd /etc && $SHELL'
2010-04-02 19:34:09
User: dooblem
Functions: ssh
Tags: ssh
4

Useful to create an alias that sends you right in the directory you want :

alias server-etc="ssh -t server 'cd /etc && $SHELL'"

ssh -q user@server
2010-03-24 12:02:55
User: KoRoVaMiLK
Functions: ssh
0

This allows you to skip the banner (usually /etc/issue.net) on ssh connections.

Useful to avoid banners outputted to your mail by rsync cronjobs.

ssh user@host "cat /path/to/backup/backupfile.tar.bz2" |tar jpxf -
2010-03-24 01:35:28
User: mack
Functions: ssh tar
Tags: ssh tar
8

Here how to recover the remote backup over ssh

tar jcpf - [sourceDirs] |ssh user@host "cat > /path/to/backup/backupfile.tar.bz2"
2010-03-24 01:29:25
User: mack
Functions: ssh tar
Tags: ssh tar
13

Execute it from the source host, where the source files you wish backup resides. With the minus '-' the tar command deliver the compressed output to the standar output and, trough over the ssh session to the remote host. On the other hand the backup host will be receive the stream and read it from the standar input sending it to the /path/to/backup/backupfile.tar.bz2

for I in $(mysql -e 'show databases' -u root --password=root -s --skip-column-names); do mysqldump -u root --password=root $I | gzip -c | ssh user@server.com "cat > /remote/$I.sql.gz"; done
2010-03-07 15:03:12
User: juliend2
Functions: gzip ssh
6

It grabs all the database names granted for the $MYSQLUSER and gzip them to a remote host via SSH.

ssh -c 'tar cvzf - -C /path/to/src/*' | tar xzf -
2010-03-02 14:15:17
Functions: ssh tar
0

Create tarball on stdout which is piped to tar reading from stdin all over ssh

for x in `grep server /tmp/error.log | awk '{print $3}'`; do \ t=`date "+%d-%m-%H%M%S"` ; ssh -q -t admin@$x.domain.com 'pstree -auln' > ~/snapshots/$x-$t.out \ done
2010-02-26 19:50:41
User: jrparris
Functions: awk ssh
0

Required:

1) Systems that send out alert emails when errors, database locks, etc occur.

2) a system that:

a) has the ability to receive emails, and has procmail installed.

b) has ssh keys set up to machines that would send out alerts.

When procmail receives alert email, you can issue a command like this one (greps and awks may very - you're isolating the remote hostname that had the issue).

This will pull process trees from the alerting machines, which is always useful in later analysis.

arecord -f dat | ssh -C user@host aplay -f dat