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Commands using stat from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using stat - 41 results
package=$1; list=/var/lib/dpkg/info/${package}.list; inst=$(stat "$list" -c %X); cat $list | (while read file; do if [ -f "$file" ];then acc=$(stat "$file" -c %X); if [ $inst -lt $acc ]; then echo used $file; exit 0; fi; fi; done; exit 1)
2010-09-20 18:10:19
User: pipeliner
Functions: cat echo exit read stat
Tags: apt dpkg date stat
1

This script compares the modification date of /var/lib/dpkg/info/${package}.list and all the files mentioned there.

It could be wrong on noatime partitions.

Here is non-oneliner:

#!/bin/sh

package=$1;

list=/var/lib/dpkg/info/${package}.list;

inst=$(stat "$list" -c %X);

cat $list |

(

while read file; do

if [ -f "$file" ]; then

acc=$(stat "$file" -c %X);

if [ $inst -lt $acc ]; then

echo used $file

exit 0

fi;

fi;

done

exit 1

)

find /path/to/archive/?/??/??? -mtime -7 -name "*.pdf" | xargs stat -c "%s"| awk '{sum +=$1}END{printf("%0.0f\n",sum)}'|sed -r ':Label;s=\b([0-9]+)([0-9]{3})\b=\1,\2=g;t Label'
2010-08-23 15:55:30
Functions: awk find sed stat xargs
0

The find command isn't the important bit, here: it's just what feeds the rest of the pipe (this one looks for all PDFs less than 7 days old, in an archive directory, whose structure is defined by a wildcard pattern: modify this find, to suit your real needs).

I consider the next bit the useful part. xargs stats out the byte-size of each file, and this is passed to awk, which adds them all together, and prints the grand total. I use printf, in order to override awk's tendency to swtich to exponential output above a certain threshold, and, specifically "%0.0f\n", because it was all I can find to force things back to digital on Redhat systems.

This is then passed to an optional sed, which formats them in a US/UK number format, to make large numbers easier to read. Change the comma in the sed, for your preferred separator character (e.g. sed -r ':L;s=\b([0-9]+)([0-9]{3})\b=\1 \2=g;t L' for most European countries).

(This sed is credited to user name 'archtoad6', on the Linuxquestions forum.)

This is useful for monitoring changes in the storage use within large and growing archives of files, and appears to execute much more quickly than some options I have seen (use of a 'for SIZE in find-command -exec du' style approach, instead, for instance). I just ran it on a not particularly spectacular server, where a directory tree with over three thousand subdirectories, containing around 4000 files, of about 4 Gigs, total, responded in under a second.

for f in $(qlist -IC); do stat /usr/portage/"$f" > /dev/null; done
2010-08-09 11:29:55
User: homoludens
Functions: stat
0

Problem arises when ebuild gets removed from portage and you end up with old and unmaintained package that you cannot find standard way. This oneliner will give you list of those packages.

function rrm(){ for i in $*; do; if [ -f $i ]; then; echo "rrm - Processing $i"; shred --force --remove --zero --verbose $i; else; echo "Can't process $i"; type=$(stat "$1" -c %F); echo "File $i is $type"; fi; done;}
2010-06-10 22:40:27
User: thelan
Functions: echo shred stat
Tags: shred
1

This command remove a file from your filesystem like the normal rm command

but instead of deleting only the inode information this also delete the data that was stored on blocks

/!\ warning this may be long for large files

for i in somefiles*.png ; do echo "$i" ; N=$(stat -c %Y $i); mv -i $i $N.png; done
2010-06-01 19:28:05
User: sufoo
Functions: echo mv stat
0

This renames a pattern matched bunch of files by their last modified time.

rename by timestamp

rename by time created

rename by time modified

find -type f -print0 | xargs -r0 stat -c %y\ %n | sort
2010-05-29 13:40:18
User: dooblem
Functions: find stat xargs
2

Works with files containing spaces and for very large directories.

find -name `egrep -s '.' * | awk -F":" '{print $1}' | sort -u` -exec stat {} \;
2010-04-26 20:01:44
Functions: awk find sort stat
1

This will run stat on each file in the directory.

dd if=file1 of=file2 seek=1 bs=$(stat -c%s file2)
svn stat -u | sort | sed -e "s/^M.*/\o033[31m&\o033[0m/" -e "s/^A.*/\o033[34m&\o033[0m/" -e "s/^D.*/\o033[35m&\o033[0m/"
2010-03-26 15:44:04
Functions: sed sort stat
Tags: bash svn sed
1

Use color escape sequences and sed to colorize the output of svn stat -u.

Colors: http://www.faqs.org/docs/abs/HTML/colorizing.html

svn stat characters: http://svnbook.red-bean.com/en/1.4/svn-book.html#svn.ref.svn.c.status

GNU Extensions for Escapes in Regular Expressions: http://www.gnu.org/software/sed/manual/html_node/Escapes.html

find . -type f -exec stat \{\} \; | grep Modify: | awk '{a[$2]++}END{for(i in a){print i " : " a[i] }}' | sort
i=0; for f in $(find ./ -size -10M -exec stat -c %s {} \; ); do i=$(($i + $f)); done; echo $i
svn ci `svn stat |awk '/^A/{printf $2" "}'`
stat -f '%Sp %p %N' * | rev | sed -E 's/^([^[:space:]]+)[[:space:]]([[:digit:]]{4})[^[:space:]]*[[:space:]]([^[:space:]]+)/\1 \2 \3/' | rev
2009-08-04 08:45:20
User: vwal
Functions: rev sed stat
2

Since the original command (#1873) didn't work on FreeBSD whose stat lacks the "-c" switch, I wrote an alternative that does. This command shows also the fourth digit of octal format permissions which yields the sticky bit information.

stat -c '%A %a %n' *
2009-04-09 10:44:56
Functions: stat
22

Nicely display permissions in octal format and filename for a given directory

find . -type f -print0 | xargs -r0 stat -c %Y\ %n | sort -rn | gawk '{sub(/.\//,"",$2); print $2}' > /tmp/playlist.m3u
2009-03-04 16:41:02
User: microft
Functions: find gawk sort stat xargs
3

I use this to generate a playlist with all the podcasts I listen to.

Ordered from most recent to older.

accurev stat -M -fl | awk '{print "\"" $0 "\""}' | xargs accurev pop