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Commands using tar from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using tar - 193 results
tar cpof - src |( cd des; tar xpof -)
2009-09-20 20:43:30
Functions: cd tar
-2

Using tape archive create a tar file in Stdout (-) and pipe that into a compound command to extract the tar file from Stdin at the destination. This similar to "Copy via tar pipe ...", but copies across file systems boundaries. I prefer to use cp -pr for copying within the same file system.

tar -cvf /dev/null . | while read i; do ls -l $i; done
2009-09-16 16:59:15
User: lbonanomi
Functions: ls read tar
-8

I find the ouput of ls -lR to be un-satisfying (why is the path data up there?) and find syntax to be awkward. Running 'du -a' means you will have likely to trim-off filesize data before feeding filenames to the next step in the pipe.

tar cvfz dir_name.tgz dir/
2009-09-15 10:20:20
Functions: tar
Tags: tar
0

This command creates tar zip of a directory and its sub-directories.

tar czf /path/archive_of_foo.`date -I`.tgz /path/foo
2009-09-07 05:45:33
Functions: tar
Tags: backup tar
1

creates a compressed tar archive of files in /path/foo and writes to a timestamped filename in /path.

tar --create --file /path/$HOSTNAME-my_name_file-$(date -I).tar.gz --atime-preserve -p -P --same-owner -z /path/
2009-09-07 04:52:12
User: Odin_sv
Functions: date tar
Tags: backup tar
1

Use tar command for a backup info with a date of creation

tar -cf - /home/user/test | gzip -c | ssh user@sshServer 'cd /tmp; tar xfz -'
2009-08-24 18:35:38
User: esplinter
Functions: gzip ssh tar
Tags: ssh file move
11

Useful to move many files (thousands or millions files) over ssh. Faster than scp because this way you save a lot of tcp connection establishments (syn/ack packets).

If using a fast lan (I have just tested gigabyte ethernet) it is faster to not compress the data so the command would be:

tar -cf - /home/user/test | ssh user@sshServer 'cd /tmp; tar xf -'

tar dfz horde-webmail-1.2.3.tar.gz
tar -C /oldirectory -cvpf - . | tar -C /newdirector -xvf -
2009-08-22 20:05:49
User: Cowboy
Functions: tar
0

It's the same like 'cp -p' if available. It's faster over networks than scp. If you have to copy gigs of data you could also use netcat and the tar -z option in conjunction -- on the receiving end do:

# nc -l 7000 | tar -xzvpf -

...and on the sending end do:

# tar -czf - * | nc otherhost 7000

cat files.txt | xargs tar -cv | tar -x -c $DIR/
2009-08-06 22:55:21
User: lingo
Functions: cat tar xargs
0

If you want certain files out of a directory hierarchy, this will copy just the listed files, but will create the directory hierarchy in the new location ($DIR/)

tar cf - dir_to_cp/ | (cd path_to_put/ && tar xvf -)
2009-08-04 16:51:31
User: jsiei97
Functions: cd tar
1

Just a copy of a big dir when you wan't things like ownership and date etc etc to be untouched.

Note: Updated with the ideas from "mpb".

sudo wget -c "http://nmap.org/dist/nmap-5.00.tar.bz2" && bzip2 -cd nmap-5.00.tar.bz2 | tar xvf - && cd nmap-5.00 && ./configure && make && sudo make install
2009-07-26 11:36:53
User: hemanth
Functions: bzip2 cd make sudo tar wget
-6

Just copy and paste the code in your terminal.

Note : sudo apt-get for debian versions , change as per your requirement .

Source : www.h3manth.com

tar c folder_to_encrypt | openssl enc -aes-256-cbc -e > secret.tar.enc
2009-07-23 06:03:39
User: recursiverse
Functions: c++ tar
5

command to decrypt:

openssl enc -aes-256-cbc -d < secret.tar.enc | tar x

Of course, don't forget to rm the original files ;) You may also want to look at the openssl docs for more options.

(cd /source/dir ; tar cv .)|(cd /dest/dir ; tar xv)
2009-07-19 10:31:13
User: marssi
Functions: cd tar
-11

the f is for file and - stdout, This way little shorter.

I Like copy-directory function It does the job but looks like SH**, and this doesn't understand folders with whitespaces and can only handle full path, but otherwise fine,

function copy-directory () { ; FrDir="$(echo $1 | sed 's:/: :g' | awk '/ / {print $NF}')" ; SiZe="$(du -sb $1 | awk '{print $1}')" ; (cd $1 ; cd .. ; tar c $FrDir/ )|pv -s $SiZe|(cd $2 ; tar x ) ; }

tar -pczf archive_name.tar.gz /path/to/dir/or/file
2009-07-17 19:53:02
User: ryuslash
Functions: tar
Tags: bash tar gzip
-2

Create a single tar.gz archive

I know it's a very basic one, but it's one I keep forgetting.

7z x -so testfile.tar.7z | tar tvf -
2009-07-15 21:00:58
User: slashdot
Functions: tar
2

Sometimes it is handy to be able to list contents of a tar file within a compressed archive, such as 7Zip in this instance, without having to extract the archive first. This is especially helpful when dealing with larger sized files.

(cd /source/dir ; tar cvf - .)|(cd /dest/dir ; tar xvpf -)
tar cf - /path/to/data | 7z a -si archivename.tar.7z
2009-07-14 14:21:30
User: slashdot
Functions: tar
8

Using 7z to create archives is OK, but when you use tar, you preserve all file-specific information such as ownership, perms, etc. If that's important to you, this is a better way to do it.

tar cvfz changes.tar.gz --exclude-vcs `svn diff -rM:N --summarize . | grep . | awk '{print $2}' | grep -E -v '^\.$'`
2009-07-13 19:39:10
User: jaysee
Functions: awk diff grep tar
2

Handy when you need to create a list of files to be updated when subversion is not available on the remote host. You can take this tar file, and upload and extract it where you need it. Replace M and N with the revisions specific to yours. Make sure you do this from an updated (svn up) working directory.

tar -C <source> -cf - . | tar -C <destination> -xf -
ls *tgz | xargs -n1 tar xzf
tar -C <source_dir> -cf . | tar -C <dest_dir> -xf -
tar -C <source_dir> -cf . | tar -C <dest_dir> -xf
tar -tf <file.tar.gz> | xargs rm -r
for i in $(tar -tf <file.tar.gz>); do rm $i; done;
2009-07-06 19:57:23
User: din7
Functions: rm tar
-4

Remove annoying improperly packaged files that untar into the incorrect directory.

Example, When you untar and it extracts hundreds of files into the current directory.... bleh.

tar -cj /backup | cstream -t 777k | ssh host 'tar -xj -C /backup'
2009-07-02 10:05:53
User: wires
Functions: host ssh tar
24

this bzips a folder and transfers it over the network to "host" at 777k bit/s.

cstream can do a lot more, have a look http://www.cons.org/cracauer/cstream.html#usage

for example:

echo w00t, i'm 733+ | cstream -b1 -t2

hehe :)