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Commands using tar from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using tar - 203 results
ssh user@host "(cd /path/to/remote/top/dir ; tar cvf - ./*)" | tar xvf -
2009-03-31 13:08:45
User: dopeman
Functions: ssh tar
Tags: copy files
1

This command will copy files and directories from a remote machine to the local one.

Ensure you are in the local directory you want to populate with the remote files before running the command.

To copy a directory and it's contents, you could:

ssh user@host "(cd /path/to/a/directory ; tar cvf - ./targetdir)" | tar xvf -

This is especially useful on *nix'es that don't have 'scp' installed by default.

on the listening side: sudo nc -lp 2022 | sudo tar -xvf - and on the sending side: tar -cvzf - ./*| nc -w 3 name_of_listening_host 2022
2009-03-27 09:59:33
User: smcpherson
Functions: sudo tar
Tags: netcat
-2

This is useful for sending data between 2 computers that you have shell access to. Uses tar compression during transfer. Files are compressed & uncompressed automatically. Note the trailing dash on the listening side that makes netcat listen to stdin for data.

on the listening side:

sudo nc -lp 2022 | sudo tar -xvf -

explanation: open netcat to -l listen on -p port 2022, take the data stream and pipe to tar -x extract, -v verbose, -f using file filename - means "stdin"

on the sending side:

tar -cvzf - ./*| nc -w 3 name_of_listening_host 2022

explanation: compress all files in current dir using tar -c create, -v verbose, -f using file, - filename - here means "stdout" because we're tar -c instead of tar -x, -w3 wait 3 seconds on stream termination and then end the connection to the listening host name_of_listening_host, on port 2022

tar -czf - * | ssh example.com "cat > files.tar.gz"
2009-03-24 17:02:02
User: migurski
Functions: ssh tar
5

I recently found myself with a filesystem I couldn't write to and a bunch of files I had to get the hell out of dodge, preferably not one at a time. This command makes it possible to pack a bunch of files into a single archive and write it to a remote server.

curl http://domain.com/file.tar.gz | tar zx
find -maxdepth 1 -type d -print0 | xargs -0 -I {} tar -cvzf {}.tar.gz {}
2009-03-17 11:12:53
User: piemme
Functions: find tar xargs
2

Create backup (.tar.gz) for all first-level directory from current dir.

find ~/project -mtime -1 -type f -print | tar jcvf myfiles.tar.bz2 -T -
2009-03-13 13:03:11
User: voyeg3r
Functions: find tar
0

create tar.bz2 package from files "-type f" modificated today "-mtime -1" in ~/project

tar cf - . | (cd /new/dir; tar xvf -)
2009-03-09 20:30:34
User: jauderho
Functions: cd tar
-1

Add z to the flags to enable compression.

alias wordpress='mkdir wordpress && cd wordpress && wget http://wordpress.org/latest.tar.gz && tar -xvzf latest.tar.gz && mv wordpress/* . && rm -rf latest.tar.gz wordpress && cp wp-config-sample.php wp-config.php'
tar cpfP - $(find <somedir> -type f -name *.png) | ssh user@host | tar xpfP -
2009-02-26 00:01:30
User: raphink
Functions: find ssh tar
7

Notes:

* Adjust the find command to your own filters.

* The -P flag forces to keep absolute paths in the tarball, so that you can be sure that the exact same file hierarchy will be created on the second machine.

tar ztf tar-lacking-subdirectory.tar.gz | xargs rm
2009-02-19 00:34:09
User: mulad
Functions: tar xargs
2

These days, most software distributed in tar files will just contain a directory at the top level, but some tar files don't have this and can leave you with a mess of files in the current folder if you blindly execute

tar zxvf something.tar.gz

This command can help you clean up after such a mistake. However, note that this has the potential to do bad things if someone has been *really* nasty with filenames.

tar -jcvf /folder/file.tar.bz2 --same-owner --same-permissions /folder/
tar zcpf backup.tgz --exclude=/proc --exclude=backup.tgz /
2009-02-18 19:31:27
User: starchox
Functions: tar
2

You can exclude more system folders or individual files which are not necessary for the backup and can be recreated after the restore procedure, like /lost+found, /mnt, /media, /tmp, /usr ...

Restoring the above backup procedure is as simple as becoming root and typing:

tar zxpf backup.tgz -C /

You can extract any file or directory out of the backup.tgz file for recovery, for instance, if you have a corrupt or mis-configured fstab file, you could simply issue the command:

tar zxpf backup.tgz /ect/fstab -C /

Other options:

v add verbose option to see files processed

A far safer solution is to restore the desired files under a different directory, and then compare, move, or update the files to their original locations afterward.

tar zcf - user | pv /bin/gzip > /tmp/backup.tar.gz
2009-02-18 14:50:45
User: nlinux
Functions: tar
4

This command tar?s up a directory and sends the output to gzip, showing a rate of 223MB/s.

This may require you installing the pv command.

For debian based users out there:

sudo aptitude install pv
curl http://example.com/foo.tar.gz | tar zxvf -
for i in *.tar.gz *.tgz; do tar -zxvf $i; done
2009-02-18 10:58:12
User: bohemicus
Functions: tar
-1

This is a little bash script that will take all files following the *gz pattern in the directory and apply the tar -zxvf command to them.

tar cvzf - /directory/ | ssh root@host "cat > /dev/nst0"
2009-02-18 07:12:54
User: Tuxmania
Functions: ssh tar
3

I use this all the time for taking manual backups of stuff i want to keep but not important enough to backup regularly.

find ~/bin/ -name "*sh" -print0 | xargs -0t tar -zcvf foofile.tar.gz
2009-02-17 08:48:34
User: lhb
Functions: find tar xargs
5

tar options may change ;)

c to compress into a tar file, z for gzip (j for bzip) man tar

-print0 and -0t are usefull for names with spaces, \, etc.

cd /source/directory; tar cf - . | tar xf - -C /destination/directory
(cd /orignl/path tar -cf - . ) | (cd /dst/dir;tar -xvf -)
2009-02-16 09:36:34
Functions: cd tar
1

uses tar to dump files from /orignl/path to /dst/dir. i find tar's out more readable than cp, and it doesn't mess with modified dates.

tar -zcps <dir> -X <(find <dir> -type f -mtime -<days>) |ssh user@backuphost tar -xzpsC /data/bkup
2009-02-12 22:31:58
User: zb
Functions: find tar
-3

due to bug can not comment

tar zcvf somedir-$(date +%Y%m%d-%H%M).tar.gz somedir/
2009-02-10 15:25:40
User: kmac
Functions: date tar
3

A useful bash function:

gztardir()

{

if [ $# -ne 1 ] ; then

echo "incorrect arguments: should be gztardir "

else

tar zcvf "${1%/}-$(date +%Y%m%d-%H%M).tar.gz" "$1"

fi

}

svn st | cut -c 8- | sed 's/^/\"/;s/$/\"/' | xargs tar -czvf ../backup.tgz
2009-02-09 11:24:31
User: chrisdrew
Functions: cut sed tar xargs
12

Create a tgz archive of all the files containing local changes relative to a subversion repository.

Add the '-q' option to only include files under version control:

svn st -q | cut -c 8- | sed 's/^/\"/;s/$/\"/' | xargs tar -czvf ../backup.tgz

Useful if you are not able to commit yet but want to create a quick backup of your work. Of course if you find yourself needing this it's probably a sign you should be using a branch, patches or distributed version control (git, mercurial, etc..)

wget -qO - "http://www.tarball.com/tarball.gz" | tar zxvf -
cd /some/directory \&\& tar cf - | cd /some/directory \&\& tar xvf - */
tar -cvzf - /source/path | ssh <targethostname> -l <username> dd of=/destination/path/backupfile.tgz
2009-02-06 15:52:09
User: smm
Functions: dd ssh tar
1

Creates a quick backup with tar to a remote host over ssh.