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Commands using tr from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using tr - 274 results
cat WAR_AND_PEACE_By_LeoTolstoi.txt | tr -cs "[:alnum:]" "\n"| tr "[:lower:]" "[:upper:]" | awk '{h[$1]++}END{for (i in h){print h[i]" "i}}'|sort -nr | cat -n | head -n 30
2010-07-05 06:39:20
User: cp
Functions: awk cat head sort tr
11

using

cat WAR_AND_PEACE_By_LeoTolstoi.txt | tr -cs "[:alnum:]" "\n"| tr "[:lower:]" "[:upper:]" | sort -S16M | uniq -c |sort -nr | cat -n | head -n 30

("sort -S1G" - Linux/GNU sort only) will also do the job but as some drawbacks (caused by space/time complexity of sorting) for bigger files...

goclf() { type "$1" | sed '1d' | tr -d "\n" | tr -s '[:space:]'; echo }
2010-06-26 21:44:17
User: meathive
Functions: echo sed tr type
5

This command will format your alias or function to a single line, trimming duplicate white space and newlines and inserting delimiter semi-colons, so it continues to work on a single line.

ifconfig eth0 | grep 'HWaddr' | awk '{print $5}' | tr 'a-z' 'A-Z' | sed -e 's/://g'
2010-06-26 05:35:03
User: minigeek
Functions: awk grep ifconfig sed tr
-3

This will get the mac address of the eth0 and change lowercase to uppercase.

The sed command removed the colons.

for n in * ; do mv $n `echo $n | tr '[:lower:]' '[:upper:]'`; done
2010-06-25 19:20:04
User: max_allan
Functions: mv tr
1

Simple bash/ksh/sh command to rename all files from lower to upper case. If you want to do other stuff you can change the tr command to a sed or awk... and/or change mv to cp....

</dev/urandom tr -dc '12345!@#$%qwertQWERTasdfgASDFGzxcvbZXCVB' | head -c8; echo ""
2010-06-17 19:30:36
User: TexasDex
Functions: echo head tr
6

Generates a random 8-character password that can be typed using only the left hand on a QWERTY keyboard. Useful to avoid taking your hand off of the mouse, especially if your username is left-handed. Change the 8 to your length of choice, add or remove characters from the list based on your preferences or kezboard layout, etc.

echo $(($(tr '\n' '+')0))
2010-06-01 18:42:39
User: whiskybar
Functions: echo tr
1

add integers from the stdin and print out the result

usually, cat /tmp/file | echo $(($(tr '\n' '+')0))

logfile=/var/log/gputemp.log; timestamp=$( date +%T );temps=$(nvidia-smi -lsa | grep Temperature | awk -F: ' { print $2 } '| cut -c2-4 | tr "\n" " ");echo "${timestamp} ${temps}" >> ${logfile}
find . -type f | sed 's,.*,stat "&" | egrep "File|Modify" | tr "\\n" " " ; echo ,' | sh | sed 's,[^/]*/\(.*\). Modify: \(....-..-.. ..:..:..\).*,\2 \1,' | sort
$grep -hIr -m 1 em:name ~/.mozilla/firefox/*.default/extensions|sed 's#\s*##'|tr '<>=' '"""'|cut -f3 -d'"'|sort -u
2010-05-24 08:03:53
User: raj77_in
Functions: sed sort tr
-1

with grep for em:name rather than name, you will get much better result.

grep -hIr -m 1 :name ~/.mozilla/firefox/*.$USER/extensions | tr '<>=' '"""' | cut -f3 -d'"' | sort -u
2010-05-18 14:49:44
User: new_user
Functions: grep sort tr
-1

1.) my profile ends with $USER not with .default

2.) only grep for the first occurrence because some extensions have the translated name also inside the install.rdf

grep -hIr :name ~/.mozilla/firefox/*.default/extensions | tr '<>=' '"""' | cut -f3 -d'"' | sort -u
tr '[A-Za-z]' '[N-ZA-Mn-za-m]'
2010-04-30 10:07:27
User: hackerb9
Functions: tr
1

I noticed some spammer posted an advertisement here for "not bad" encryption. Unfortunately, their software only runs under Microsoft Windows and fails to work from the commandline. My shell script improves upon those two aspects, with no loss in security, using the exact same "military-grade" encryption technology, which has the ultra-cool codename "ROT-13". For extra security, I recommend running ROT-13 twice.

echo "$1" | xxd -p | tr '0-9' '5-90-6'; echo "$1" | tr '0-9' '5-90-6' | xxd -r -p
2010-04-27 03:08:47
User: IsraelTorres
Functions: echo tr
2

This is N5 sorta like rot13 but with numbers only.

Encrypt

echo "$1" | xxd -p | tr '0-9' '5-90-6'

Decrypt

echo "$1" | tr '0-9' '5-90-6' | xxd -r -p

echo StrinG | tr '[:upper:]' '[:lower:]'
tr -d "\n\r" | grep -ioEm1 "<title[^>]*>[^<]*</title" | cut -f2 -d\> | cut -f1 -d\<
cat /etc/apache2/sites-enabled/* | egrep 'ServerAlias|ServerName' | tr -s ' ' | sed 's/^\s//' | cut -d ' ' -f 2 | sed 's/www.//' | sort | uniq
2010-04-08 15:50:34
User: chronosMark
Functions: cat cut egrep sed sort tr
2

Get a list of all the unique hostnames from the apache configuration files. Handy to see what sites are running on a server. A slightly shorter version.

cat /etc/apache2/sites-enabled/* | egrep 'ServerAlias|ServerName' | tr -s " " | sed 's/^[ ]//g' | uniq | cut -d ' ' -f 2 | sed 's/www.//g' | sort | uniq
2010-04-08 08:51:17
User: chronosMark
Functions: cat cut egrep sed sort tr uniq
0

Get a list of all the unique hostnames from the apache configuration files. Handy to see what sites are running on a server.

printf "%`tput cols`s"|tr ' ' '#'
function wherepath () { for DIR in `echo $PATH | tr ":" "\n" | awk '!x[$0]++ {print $0}'`; do ls ${DIR}/$1 2>/dev/null; done }
2010-04-02 20:32:36
User: mscar
Functions: awk ls tr
Tags: find locate PATH
0

The wherepath function will search all the directories in your PATH and print a unique list of locations in the order they are first found in the PATH. (PATH often has redundant entries.) It will automatically use your 'ls' alias if you have one or you can hardcode your favorite 'ls' options in the function to get a long listing or color output for example.

Alternatives:

'whereis' only searches certain fixed locations.

'which -a' searches all the directories in your path but prints duplicates.

'locate' is great but isn't installed everywhere (and it's often too verbose).

seq -s'#' 0 $(tput cols) | tr -d '[:digit:]'
2010-04-01 09:06:44
User: jgc
Functions: seq tput tr
Tags: seq tr tput
6

Print a row of characters across the terminal. Uses tput to establish the current terminal width, and generates a line of characters just long enough to cross it. In the example '#' is used.

It's possible to use a repeating sequence by dividing the columns by the number of characters in the sequence like this:

seq -s'~-' 0 $(( $(tput cols) /2 )) | tr -d '[:digit:]'

or

seq -s'-~?' 0 $(( $(tput cols) /3 )) | tr -d '[:digit:]'

You will lose chararacters at the end if the length isn't cleanly divisible.

printf "%.50d" 0 | tr 0 -
seq -s" " -50 -1 | tr -dc -
2010-03-25 06:00:24
Functions: seq tr
5

Get there by going backwards and forgetting the numbers.

tr '\n' '\t' < inputfile
tr '\t' '\n' < inputfile
grep current_state= /var/log/nagios/status.dat|sort|uniq -c|sed -e "s/[\t ]*\([0-9]*\).*current_state=\([0-9]*\)/\2:\1/"|tr "\n" " "