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Functions

Commands using tr from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using tr - 286 results
seq -w 50 | sort -R | head -6 |fmt|tr " " "-"
head -100000 /dev/urandom | strings|tr '[A-Z]' '[a-z]'|sort >temp.txt && wget -q http://www.mavi1.org/web_security/wordlists/webster-dictionary.txt -O-|tr '[A-Z]' '[a-z]'|sort >temp2.txt&&comm -12 temp.txt temp2.txt
/usr/bin/lynx -dump http://www.netins.net/dialup/tools/my_ip.shtml | grep -A2 "Your current IP Address is:" | tail -n1 | tr -d ' '|sed '/^$/d'| sed 's/^ *//g'
sitepass2() {salt="this_salt";pass=`echo -n "$@"`;for i in {1..500};do pass=`echo -n $pass$salt|sha512sum`;done;echo$pass|gzip -|strings -n 1|tr -d "[:space:]"|tr -s '[:print:]' |tr '!-~' 'P-~!-O'|rev|cut -b 2-15;history -d $(($HISTCMD-1));}
2010-12-09 08:42:24
User: Soubsoub
Functions: cut gzip strings tr
Tags: Security
-4

This is a safest variation for "sitepass function" that includes a SALT over a long loop for sha512sum hash

tr "\n" " " < file
2010-12-08 16:13:54
User: randy909
Functions: tr
7

Even shorter. Stolen from comment posted by eightmillion.

echo `cat /dev/urandom | base64 | tr -dc "[:alnum:]" | head -c64`
2010-12-06 21:04:57
User: Dereckson
Functions: echo head tr
0

The same command, but with a base64 filter, more forgiving for special characters than tr.

echo `cat /dev/urandom |tr -dc "[:alnum:]" | head -c64`
cat file | tr -d "\n"
2010-12-02 09:22:02
User: uzsolt
Functions: cat file tr
-1

This command deletes the "newline" chars, so its output maybe unusable :)

cat file | tr "\n" " "
2010-12-02 09:21:02
User: uzsolt
Functions: cat file tr
8

It's works only when you replace '\n' to ONE character.

ps -eo args,%cpu | grep -m1 PROCESS | tr 'a-z-' ' ' | awk '{print $1}'
echo "10 i 2 o $(date +"%H%M"|cut -b 1,2,3,4 --output-delimiter=' ') f"|dc|tac|xargs printf "%04d\n"|tr "01" ".*"
2010-11-24 23:49:21
User: unefunge
Functions: echo printf tr xargs
3

displays current time in "binary clock" format

(loosely) inspired by: http://www.thinkgeek.com/homeoffice/lights/59e0/

"Decoding":

8421

.... - 1st hour digit: 0

*..* - 2nd hour digit: 9 (8+1)

.*.. - 1st minutes digit: 4

*..* - 2nd minutes digit: 9 (8+1)

Prompt-command version:

PROMPT_COMMAND='echo "10 i 2 o $(date +"%H%M"|cut -b 1,2,3,4 --output-delimiter=" ") f"|dc|tac|xargs printf "%04d\n"|tr "01" ".*"'

mailq | grep MAILER-DAEMON | awk '{print $1}' | tr -d '*' | postsuper -d -
for i in ./*.$1; do mv "$i" `echo $i | tr ' ' '_'`; done for i in ./*.$1; do mv "$i" `echo $i | tr '[A-Z]' '[a-z]'`; done for i in ./*.$1; do mv "$i" `echo $i | tr '-' '_'`; done for i in ./*.$1; do mv "$i" `echo $i | tr -s '_' `; done
echo `lcg-infosites --vo lhcb ce | cut -f 1| grep [[:digit:]]| tr '\n' '+' |sed -e 's/\ //g' -e 's/+$//'`|bc -l
2010-11-10 15:06:00
User: kbat
Functions: bc cut echo grep sed tr
-2

Of course, this command must be executed at a GRID User Interface

lhcb - name of your VO, substitute it with the one you are interested it.

od -N 4 -t uL -An /dev/random | tr -d " "
2010-11-09 07:57:16
User: hfs
Functions: od tr
Tags: random
2

Reads 4 bytes from the random device and formats them as unsigned integer between 0 and 2^32-1.

for f in * ; do mv "$f" $( echo $f | tr ' ' '-' ) ; done
tr -cs A-Za-z '\n' | sort | uniq -ci
2010-10-20 04:12:58
Functions: sort tr uniq
Tags: sort uniq tr
0

Gives the same results as the command by putnamhill using nine less characters.

tr A-Z a-z | tr -cs a-z '\n' | sort | uniq -c
tr A-Z a-z | tr -d "[[:punct:]][[:digit:]]" | tr ' /_' '\n' | sort | uniq -c
tr A-Z a-z | tr -d 0-9\[\],\*-.?\:\"\(\)#\;\<\>\@ | tr ' /_' '\n' | sort | uniq -c
curl -s $dellurl$1 | tr "\"" "\n" | grep "</td></tr><tr><td class=" -m 2 | grep -v "Service Tag" | sed 's/>//g' | sed 's/<\/td<\/tr<tr<td class=//g'
du --max-depth=1|sort -n|cut -f2|tr '\n' '\0'|xargs -0 du -sh 2>/dev/null
wget -qO - http://i18n.counter.li.org/ | grep 'users registered' | sed 's/.*\<font size=7\>//g' | tr '\>' ' ' | sed 's/<br.*//g' | tr ' ' '\0'
tr -cd '[:alnum:]' < /dev/urandom | fold -w30 | head -n1
netstat -n | grep '^tcp.*<IP>:<PORT>' | tr " " | awk 'BEGIN{FS="( |:)"}{print $6}' | sort | uniq -c | sort -n -k1 | awk '{if ($1 >= 10){print $2}}'
2010-09-16 21:06:30
User: guptavi
Functions: awk grep netstat sort tr uniq
1

This command is primarily going to work on linux boxes.

and needs to be changed, for example

IP=10\.194\.194\.2

PORT=389