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Commands using tr from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using tr - 287 results
echo sortmeplease | grep -o . | sort | tr -d '\n'; echo
2009-09-03 00:52:49
User: MrMerry
Functions: echo grep sort tr
1

Sorts a character string, using common shell commands.

ZIP=48104; curl http://thefuckingweather.com/?zipcode=$ZIP 2>/dev/null|grep -A1 'div class="large"'|tr '\n' ' '|sed 's/^.*"large" >\(..\)/\1/;s/&d.* <br \/>/ - /;s/<br \/>//;s/<\/div.*$//'
2009-08-29 19:33:35
User: sleepynate
Functions: grep sed tr
1

grab the weather, with a little expletive fun. replace the 48104 with a US zipcode, or the name of your city (such as ZIP="oslo"), unless you want to know what the weather is like for me (and that's fine too)

tr : '\n' <<<$PATH
echo "aBcDeFgH123" | tr a-z A-Z
for i in `seq 1 255`; do ping -c 1 10.10.10.$i | tr \\n ' ' | awk '/1 received/ {print $2}'; done
2009-08-22 09:34:27
User: hemanth
Functions: awk ping tr
Tags: ping
2

Ping sweep without NMAP

cat filename | tr '\n' '\0' | du -hsc ?files0-from=-
2009-08-21 18:36:49
User: Diluted
Functions: cat du tr
0

du only accepts lines ending with a NUL, which can be a pain to create. This solves that issue.

yes | tr 'y' 'n'
printf '%*s\n' 20 | tr ' ' '#'
tr " " "\n" | nl
2009-08-13 14:36:18
User: dendoes
Functions: tr
1

translate and number lines is simpler and you use tr to choose your delimiter (eg for csv files)

find . -type f -printf '%20s %p\n' | sort -n | cut -b22- | tr '\n' '\000' | xargs -0 ls -laSr
2009-08-13 13:13:33
User: fsilveira
Functions: cut find ls sort tr xargs
Tags: sort find ls
10

This command will find the biggest files recursively under a certain directory, no matter if they are too many. If you try the regular commands ("find -type f -exec ls -laSr {} +" or "find -type f -print0 | xargs -0 ls -laSr") the sorting won't be correct because of command line arguments limit.

This command won't use command line arguments to sort the files and will display the sorted list correctly.

ls -1 *.jpg | while read fn; do export pa=`exiv2 "$fn" | grep timestamp | awk '{ print $4 " " $5 ".jpg"}' | tr ":" "-"`; mv "$fn" "$pa"; done
2009-08-10 00:52:22
User: axanc
Functions: awk export grep ls mv read tr
0

Renames all the jpg files as their timestamps with ".jpg" extension.

randpw(){ < /dev/urandom tr -dc _A-Z-a-z-0-9 | head -c${1:-16};echo;}
2009-08-07 07:30:57
User: frozenfire
Functions: head tr
3

Generates password consisting of alphanumeric characters, defaults to 16 characters unless argument given.

dd if=/dev/urandom count=200 bs=1 2>/dev/null | tr "\n" " " | sed 's/[^a-zA-Z0-9]//g' | cut -c-16
printf '\!:1\0\!:1\0\!:2' | mmencode | tr -d '\n' | sed 's/^/AUTH PLAIN /'
2009-08-04 05:04:50
User: vwal
Functions: printf sed tr
4

I use this as an alias:

alias authplain "printf '\!:1\0\!:1\0\!:2' | mmencode | tr -d '\n' | sed 's/^/AUTH PLAIN /'"

then..

# authplain [email protected] secretpassword

AUTH PLAIN c29tZXVzZXJAc29tZWRvbWFpbi5jb20Ac29tZXVzZXJAc29tZWRvbWFpbi5jb20Ac2VjcmV0cGFzc3dvcmQ=

#

DD=`cat /etc/my.cnf | sed "s/#.*//g;" | grep datadir | tr '=' ' ' | gawk '{print $2;}'` && ( cd $DD ; find . -mindepth 2 | grep -v db\.opt | sed 's/\.\///g; s/\....$//g; s/\//./;' | sort | uniq | tr '/' '.' | gawk '{print "CHECK TABLE","`"$1"`",";";}' )
2009-07-25 03:42:31
User: atcroft
Functions: cd find gawk grep sed sort tr uniq
-1

This command will generate "CHECK TABLE `db_name.table_name` ;" statements for all tables present in databases on a MySQL server, which can be piped into the mysql command. (Can also be altered to perform OPTIMIZE and REPAIR functions.)

Tested on MySQL 4.x and 5.x systems in a Linux environment under bash.

while true ; do IFS="" read i; echo "$i"; sleep .01; done < <(tr -c "[:digit:]" " " < /dev/urandom | dd cbs=$COLUMNS conv=unblock | GREP_COLOR="1;32" grep --color "[^ ]")
2009-07-22 03:59:07
Functions: dd echo grep read sleep tr true
Tags: color
2

Same as above but slooooow it down

find / | xargs ls -l | tr -s ' ' | cut -d ' ' -f 1,3,4,9
infile=$1 for i in $(cat $infile) do echo $i | tr "," "\n" | sort -n | tr "\n" "," | sed "s/,$//" echo done
2009-07-12 21:23:37
User: iframe
Functions: cat echo sed sort tr
Tags: cat bash sort sed tr
0

Save the script as: sort_file

Usage: sort_file < sort_me.csv > out_file.csv

This script was originally posted by Admiral Beotch in LinuxQuestions.org on the Linux-Software forum.

I modified this script to make it more portable.

tempo=33; slope=10; maxfreq=888; function sinus { echo "s($1/$slope)*$maxfreq"|bc -l|tr -d '-'; }; for((i=1;;i++)); do beep -l$tempo -f`sinus $i`; done
2009-07-10 21:24:11
User: 5z474n
Functions: bc echo tr
1

Infinitely plays beeps with sinusoidally changing sound frequency. Ideal for alarm on an event.

/originalInstall/gem list | tr -d '(),' | xargs -L 1 sudo ./gemInst.sh
2009-07-09 21:46:06
User: snakerdlk
Functions: sudo tr xargs
Tags: bash Linux
0

gemInst.sh:

#!/bin/bash

for i in $@; do

if [ "$1" != "$i" ]

then

echo /newInstall/gem install $1 -v=\"$i\"

/newInstall/gem install $1 -v="$i"

if [ "$?" != "0" ]

then

echo -e "\n\nGEM INSTALL ERROR: $1\n\n"

echo "$1" > gemInst.err

fi

fi

done

< <infile> tr ' \t' '\n' | tr -s '\n' > <outfile>
2009-07-07 01:17:47
User: qubyte
Functions: tr
Tags: shell tr
-1

Puts words on new lines, removing additional newlines.

tr ' \t' '\n' <INFILE >OUTFILE
2009-07-06 21:24:44
User: CharlieInCO
Functions: tr
Tags: shell
2

Simply translates whitespace to newlines. Could be enhanced to compress out extra newlines, but that might be better handled in the next tool down the pipe, with eg uniq(1).

LC_ALL=C tr -c "[:digit:]" " " < /dev/urandom | dd cbs=$COLUMNS conv=unblock | GREP_COLOR="1;32" grep --color "[^ ]"
2009-07-02 07:10:33
User: zzambia
Functions: dd grep tr
Tags: color
7

Solves "tr" issues with non C-locales under BSD-like systems (like OS X)

tr -c "[:digit:]" " " < /dev/urandom | dd cbs=$COLUMNS conv=unblock | GREP_COLOR="1;32" grep --color "[^ ]"
cat myfile.txt | tr -d '\n'