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commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again.

Delete that bloated snippets file you've been using and share your personal repository with the world. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.


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May 19, 2015 - A Look At The New Commandlinefu
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Commands using xargs from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using xargs - 633 results
ls /usr/bin | xargs whatis | grep -v nothing | less
2010-01-26 12:59:47
User: michelsberg
Functions: grep ls whatis xargs
12

no loop, only one call of grep, scrollable ("less is more", more or less...)

find . -maxdepth 1 -type f| xargs sha1sum | sed 's/^\(\w*\)\s*\(.*\)/\2 \1/' | while read LINE; do mv $LINE; done
dpkg -l | grep ^rc | awk '{print $2}' | sudo xargs dpkg -P
echo $VARIABLE | xargs -d'\40' -n 6 echo
2010-01-20 15:12:53
User: SuperFly
Functions: echo xargs
1

Print out the contents of $VARIABLE, six words per line, ignoring any single or double quotes in the text. Useful when $VARIABLE contains a sentence that changes periodically, and may or may not contain quoted text.

find . -name "*.php" | xargs grep -il searchphrase
2010-01-14 22:42:36
User: refrax
Functions: find grep xargs
2

This command will find all files recursively containing the phrase entered, represented here by "searchphrase". This particular command searches in all php files, but you could change that to just be html files or just log files etc.

exipick -zi | xargs exim -Mrm
find /lib/modules/`uname -r`/ -type f -iname '*.o' -or -iname '*.ko' |grep -i -o '[a-z0-9]*[-|_]*[0-9a-z]*\.ko$' |xargs -I {} echo '# {}' >>/etc/modules.autoload.d/kernel-2.6
2010-01-13 02:12:08
User: paragao
Functions: echo find grep xargs
-1

Whenever you compile a new kernel, there are always new modules. The best way to make sure you have the correct modules loaded when you boot is to add all your modules in the modules.autoload file (they will be commented) and uncomment all those modules you need.

Also a good way to keep track of the available modules in your system.

For other distros you may have to change the name of the file to /etc/modprobe.conf

grep -e `date +%Y-%m-%d` /var/log/dpkg.log | awk '/install / {print $4}' | uniq | xargs apt-get -y remove
ifconfig -l | xargs -n1 ipconfig getifaddr 2> /dev/null
find dir -size -1024k -type f | xargs -d $'\n' -n1 ls -l | cut -d ' ' -f 5 | sed -e '2,$s/$/+/' -e '$ap' | dc
2009-12-28 04:23:01
User: zhangweiwu
Functions: cut dir find ls sed xargs
Tags: size sum
1

The command gives size of all files smaller than 1024k, this information, together with disk usage, can help determin file system parameter (e.g. block size) or storage device (e.g. SSD v.s. HDD).

Note if you use awk instead of "cut| dc", you easily breach maximum allowed number of records in awk.

find . -name '*png' -printf '%h\0' | xargs -0 ls -l --hide=*.png | grep -ZB1 ' 0$'
find | xargs chmod 777
find ./wp-content/themes/rotce2009/ -name '*.php' -type f | xargs sed -i 's/<? /<?php /g'
ls | xargs du -sh
find . -iname "*.jpg" -print0 | tr '[A-Z]' '[a-z]' | xargs -0 cp --backup=numbered -dp -u --target-directory {location} &
2009-12-10 08:47:04
User: oracular
Functions: cp find tr xargs
4

Use if you have pictures all over the place and you want to copy them to a central location

Synopsis:

Find jpg files

translate all file names to lowercase

backup existing, don't overwrite, preserve mode ownership and timestamps

copy to a central location

mkdir myicons && find /usr/share/icons/ -type f | xargs cp -t myicons
2009-12-09 17:43:28
User: rodolfoap
Functions: cp find mkdir xargs
Tags: icons
2

Today I needed to choose an icon for an app. My simpler way: put all of /usr/share/icons in myicons folder and brows'em with nautilus. Then rm -r 'ed the entire dir.

find . -iname '*.mp3' -type f -print0 | xargs -I{} -0 cp {} </path>
2009-12-08 20:50:48
User: sputnick
Functions: cp find xargs
5

No problem with word splitting. That should works on many Unix likes.

git clean -n | sed 's/Would remove //; /Would not remove/d;' | xargs mv -t stuff/
ps ax| awk '/[h]ttpd/{print $1}'| xargs kill -9
ps aux| grep -v grep| grep httpd| awk {'print $2'}| xargs kill -9
find . -type f | perl -lne 'print if -T;' | xargs egrep "somepattern"
\ls -1 | xargs -l readlink
2009-11-23 19:28:03
User: TeacherTiger
Functions: xargs
Tags: readlink
2

For those who don't have the symlinks command, you can use readlink. This command is not straightforward because readlink is very picky. The backslash in front of 'ls' means not to use an alias (e.g. color escape codes from an aliased 'ls' could mess up readlink), and the -1 (one) means to print the entries separated by newlines. xargs -l (the letter L) means to process each input separated by newlines as separate commands.

du | sort -nr | cut -f2- | xargs du -hs
find <dir> -printf '%p : %A@\n' | awk '{FS=" : " ; if($2 < <time in epoc> ) print $1 ;}' | xargs rm --verbose -fr ;
2009-11-20 16:31:58
User: angleto
Functions: awk find rm xargs
-2

remove files with access time older than a given date.

If you want to remove files with a given modification time replace %A@ with %T@. Use %C@ for the modification time.

The time is expressed in epoc but is easy to use any other format.

awk '{print $1}' "/proc/modules" | xargs modinfo | awk '/^(filename|desc|depends)/'