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Commands using xargs from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using xargs - 617 results
find -type f | xargs file | grep ".*: .* text" | sed "s;\(.*\): .* text.*;\1;"
heroku manager:apps --org org-name | xargs -I {} heroku apps:delete {} --confirm {}
exipick -zi | xargs --max-args=1000 exim -Mrm
2012-12-12 20:46:22
User: jasen
Functions: xargs
Tags: bash awk exim
0

do 1000 at a time so that if your doodoo is deep you can avoid avoid "command-line too big" error

find . | xargs perl -p -i.bak -e 's/oldString/newString/;'
2012-11-28 17:11:18
User: RedFox
Functions: find perl xargs
0

find . = will set up your recursive search. You can narrow your search to certain file by adding -name "*.ext" or limit buy using the same but add prune like -name "*.ext" -prune

xargs =sets it up like a command line for each file find finds and will invoke the next command which is perl.

perl = invoke perl

-p sets up a while loop

-i in place and the .bak will create a backup file like filename.ext.bak

-e execute the following....

's/ / /;' your basic substitute and replace.

grep -l <string-to-match> * | xargs grep -c <string-not-to-match> | grep '\:0'
find . \( -name \*.cgi -o -name \*.txt -o -name \*.htm -o -name \*.html -o -name \*.shtml \) -print | xargs grep -s pattern
find . -name "*" -print | xargs grep -s pattern
find / -xdev \( -perm -4000 \) -type f -print0 | xargs -0 ls -l
grep -rl string_to_find public_html/css/ | xargs -I '{}' vim +/string_to_find {} -c ":s/string_to_find/string_replaced"
2012-11-07 14:44:51
User: algol
Functions: grep vim xargs
-1

Open all files which have some string go directly to the first line where that string is and run command on it.

Other examples:

Run vim only once with multiple files (and just go to string in the first one):

grep -rl string_to_find public_html/css/ | xargs vim +/string_to_find

Run vim for each file, go to string in every one and run command (to delete line):

grep -rl string_to_find public_html/css/ | xargs -I '{}' vim +/string_to_find {} -c ":delete"
ls /var/log/sa/sa[0-9]*|xargs -I '{}' sar -u -f {}|awk '/^[0-9]/&&!/^12:00:01|RESTART|CPU/{print "%user: "$4" %system: "$6" %iowait: "$7" %nice: "$5" %idle: "$9}'|sort -nk10|head
ls /var/log/sa/sa[0-9]*|xargs -I '{}' sar -q -f {}| awk '/Average/'|awk '{runq+=$2;plist+=$3}END{print "average runq-sz:",runq/NR; print "average plist-sz: "plist/NR}'
diff ../source-dir.orig/ ../source-dir.post/ | grep "Only in" | sed -e 's/^.*\:.\(\<.*\>\)/\1/g' | xargs rm -r
2012-10-17 14:12:32
User: bigc00p
Functions: diff grep rm sed xargs
0

Good for when your working on building a clean source install for RPM packaging or what have you. After testing, run this command to compare the original extracted source to your working source directory and it will remove the differences that are created when running './configure' and 'make'.

find /var/cache/apt -not -mtime -7 | sudo xargs rm
ls /dev/disk* | xargs -n 1 -t sudo zdb -l | grep GPTE_
2012-10-06 20:19:45
User: grahamperrin
Functions: grep ls sudo xargs
1

Show the UUID-based alternate device names of ZEVO-related partitions on Darwin/OS X. Adapted from the lines by dbrady at http://zevo.getgreenbytes.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=700#p700 and following the disk device naming scheme at http://zevo.getgreenbytes.com/wiki/pmwiki.php?n=Site.DiskDeviceNames

find . -type d -maxdepth 1 | xargs du -sh
find site/ -type d | xargs sudo chmod 755
find ./ -type f | xargs sudo chmod 644
find /var/cache/pacman/pkg -not -mtime -7 | sudo xargs rm
2012-09-20 12:36:44
User: brejktru
Functions: find sudo xargs
1

Sometimes my /var/cache/pacman/pkg directory gets quite big in size. If that happens I run this command to remove old package files. Packages that we're upgraded in last N days are kept in case you are forced to downgrade a specific package. The command is obviously Arch Linux related.

<cmd> | xargs -0 <cmd>
find . -type f -size -80k -print0|xargs -0 rm
2012-09-19 12:15:32
User: DeepThought
Functions: find xargs
0

Probably neither faster nor better than -delete in find. It's just that I generally dislike teaching find builtin actions.

lpstat -p | cut -d' ' -f2 | xargs -I{} lpadmin -x {}
2012-09-18 02:11:53
User: bmeehan
Functions: cut lpadmin lpstat xargs
0

This is the closest you can get to "reset printing system" from the command line. Giving credit back to J D McIninch from an apple forum back in 2009.

git status --porcelain | awk '{print $2}' | xargs git add
2012-09-05 18:07:26
User: brandizzi
Functions: awk xargs
0

Uses the --porcelain option, which is garanteed to be stable among git versions and configurations - also, is way easier to parse.

lsmod | tail -n +2 | cut -d' ' -f1 | xargs modinfo | egrep '^file|^desc|^dep' | sed -e'/^dep/s/$/\n/g'
sudo find . -name "*.csv" | xargs /bin/rm
2012-08-29 11:38:37
User: defc0n1
Functions: find sudo xargs
0

In case you ever got to many arguments using rm to delete multiple files matching a pattern this will help you