All commands (12,987)

  • Uses logger in a while loop to log memory statistics frequently into the local syslog server.


    3
    while true; do { $(which logger) -p local4.notice `free -m | grep Mem`; sleep 60; } done &
    Neo23x0 · 2009-06-22 00:29:53 0
  • Command binds a set of commands to the F12 key. Feel free to alter the dashboard according to your own needs. How to find the key codes? Type read Then press the desired key (example: F5) ^[[15~ Try bind '"\e[15~"':"\"ssh su@ip-address\C-m""" or bind '"\e[16~"':"\"apachectl -k restart\C-m""" Show Sample Output


    17
    bind '"\e[24~"':"\"ps -elF;df -h;free -mt;netstat -lnpt;who -a\C-m"""
    Neo23x0 · 2009-06-21 23:57:20 5
  • !* is all of the arguments to the previous command rather than just the last one. This is useful in many situations. Here's a simple example: vi cd /stuff oops! [exit vi, twice] !* expands to: cd /stuff


    86
    !*
    Neo23x0 · 2009-06-21 17:58:01 6
  • This command securely erases all the unused blocks on a partition. The unused blocks are the "free space" on the partition. Some of these blocks will contain data from previously deleted files. You might want to use this if you are given access to an old computer and you do not know its provenance. The command could be used while booted from a LiveCD to clear freespace space on old HD. On modern Linux LiveCDs, the "ntfs-3g" system provides ReadWrite access to NTFS partitions thus enabling this method to also be used on Wind'ohs drives. NB depending on the size of the partition, this command could take a while to complete. Show Sample Output


    8
    # cd $partition; dd if=/dev/zero of=ShredUnusedBlocks bs=512M; shred -vzu ShredUnusedBlocks
    mpb · 2009-06-21 14:17:22 6

  • 3
    sudo sed 's/\o0/\n/g' "/proc/$(pidof -x firefox)/environ" ;# replace firefox
    plasticdoc · 2009-06-21 09:47:02 3
  • This command displays a clock on your terminal which updates the time every second. Press Ctrl-C to exit. A couple of variants: A little bit bigger text: watch -t -n1 "date +%T|figlet -f big" You can try other figlet fonts, too. Big sideways characters: watch -n 1 -t '/usr/games/banner -w 30 $(date +%M:%S)' This requires a particular version of banner and a 40-line terminal or you can adjust the width ("30" here). Show Sample Output


    45
    watch -t -n1 "date +%T|figlet"
    dennisw · 2009-06-21 01:02:37 9
  • sudo pmset -a hibernatemode 1 sets hiberate on. sudo pmset -a hibernatemode 0 sets hibernate off. from the pmset man page: 0001 (bit 0) enables hibernation; causes OS X to write memory state to hibernation image at sleep time. On wake (without bit 1 set) OS X will resume from the hibernation image. Bit 0 set (without bit 1 set) causes OS X to write memory state and immediately hibernate at sleep time. I often change my MacBook's sleep state. So I created a function for bash to make it a little easier. Usage: hibernate (on | off) "hibernate on" will set your laptop to hibernate if the lid is closed. "hibernate off" will set your laptop to sleep if the lid is closed. ### note : "proper" indentation isn't preserved on the website function hibernate() { case "${1}" in on) sudo pmset -a hibernatemode 1 echo Hibernate mode on. ;; off) sudo pmset -a hibernatemode 0 echo Hiberate mode off. ;; *) echo "I'm sorry Dave, but I can't do that." ;; esac } To make things easier, add the proper line in your /etc/sudoers file so that your user may invoke pmset without a password. Here's how mine looks: bwayne luna = NOPASSWD: /usr/bin/pmset Don't forget that you must edit sudoers with `sudo visudo` from Terminal.app, and not by another text editor. Sorry this is so Mac OS specific. Show Sample Output


    -1
    sudo pmset -a hibernatemode 1
    thebillywayne · 2009-06-20 22:52:10 0

  • 2
    svn status | grep '!' | sed 's/!/ /' | xargs svn del --force
    tarzantiger · 2009-06-20 13:01:07 0

  • 3
    mplayer dvdnav:// -dvd-device foo.img -mouse-movements
    dezza · 2009-06-19 23:03:04 0

  • 5
    unrar p -inul foo.rar|mplayer -
    dezza · 2009-06-19 22:40:01 0
  • The option -an disables audio recording, -f forces the use of video4linux for the input, -s sets the video to the size 320x240, -b sets the recording bitrate, -r sets the frame rate to 15fps, -i gives the input device, -vcodec sets the output format. Press Q to stop recording or you can specify the recording time with the -t option like -t 00:1:30


    3
    ffmpeg -an -f video4linux -s 320x240 -b 800k -r 15 -i /dev/v4l/video0 -vcodec mpeg4 myvideo.avi
    dcabanis · 2009-06-19 17:41:43 2
  • Encode video.avi into newvideo.avi using the libav codec to produce an MPEG4 file with a bitrate of 800


    1
    mencoder video.avi lavc -lavcopts vcodec=mpeg4:vbitrate=800 newvideo.avi
    dcabanis · 2009-06-19 17:30:46 1
  • video.avi is the resulting file. Press Ctrl+c to stop the recording. You can change the OVC option to another to record into a different format.


    1
    mencoder -tv device=/dev/video1 tv:// -ovc copy -o video.avi
    dcabanis · 2009-06-19 17:21:33 0
  • GNU Sed can 'address' between two regex, but it continues parsing through to the end of the file. This slight alteration causes it to terminate reading the input file once the STOP match is made. In my example I have included an extra '/START/d' as my 'start' marker line contains the 'stop' string (I'm extracting data between 'resets' and using the time stamp as the 'start'). My previous coding using grep is slightly faster near the end of the file, but overall (extracting all the reset cycles in turn) the new SED method is quicker and a lot neater. Show Sample Output


    3
    sed -n '/START/,${/STOP/q;p}'
    mungewell · 2009-06-19 15:27:36 1

  • -5
    ga
    miccaman · 2009-06-19 12:20:10 0
  • insert filename Normal mode: "%p Insert mode: %


    1
    :r! echo %
    miccaman · 2009-06-19 12:17:28 3
  • src: daily vim blog


    3
    :source ~/.vimrc
    miccaman · 2009-06-19 12:14:55 0

  • 2
    :set nomore :argdo %s/foo/bar/g | update
    miccaman · 2009-06-19 12:12:33 0
  • will show: installed linux headers, image, or modules: /^ii/!d avoiding current kernel: /'"$(uname -r | sed "s/\(.*\)-\([^0-9]\+\)/\1/")"'/d only application names: s/^[^ ]* [^ ]* \([^ ]*\).*/\1/ avoiding stuff without a version number: /[0-9]/!d Show Sample Output


    4
    dpkg -l 'linux-*' | sed '/^ii/!d;/'"$(uname -r | sed "s/\(.*\)-\([^0-9]\+\)/\1/")"'/d;s/^[^ ]* [^ ]* \([^ ]*\).*/\1/;/[0-9]/!d'
    plasticdoc · 2009-06-19 10:23:38 1
  • will purge: only installed apps: /^ii/!d avoiding current kernel stuff: /'"$(uname -r | sed "s/\(.*\)-\([^0-9]\+\)/\1/")"'/d using app names: s/^[^ ]* [^ ]* \([^ ]*\).*/\1/ avoiding stuff without a version number: /[0-9]/!d


    7
    dpkg -l 'linux-*' | sed '/^ii/!d;/'"$(uname -r | sed "s/\(.*\)-\([^0-9]\+\)/\1/")"'/d;s/^[^ ]* [^ ]* \([^ ]*\).*/\1/;/[0-9]/!d' | xargs sudo apt-get -y purge
    plasticdoc · 2009-06-19 10:11:00 0
  • This commands will make it easier to select only common items between two files being compared. If your lines start with things other than lowercase a-z, adjust this Regex appropriately. Number of lines in the output has been set to no more than 10000, and should be adjusted as needed.


    -1
    gdiff --unified=10000 input.file1 inpute.file2 | egrep -v "(^\+[a-z]|^\-[a-z])"| sort > outputfile.sorted
    slashdot · 2009-06-18 20:35:00 3
  • Stuck behind a restrictive firewall at work, but really jonesing to putty home to your linux box for some colossal cave? Goodness knows I was...but the firewall at work blocked all outbound connections except for ports 80 and 443. (Those were wide open for outbound connections.) So now I putty over port 443 and have my linux box redirect it to port 22 (the SSH port) before it routes it internally. So, my specific command would be: iptables -t nat -A PREROUTING -p tcp --dport 443 -j REDIRECT --to-ports 22 Note that I use -A to append this command to the end of the chain. You could replace that with -I to insert it at the beginning (or at a specific rulenum). My linux box is running slackware, with a kernel from circa 2001. Hopefully the mechanics of iptables haven't changed since then. The command is untested under any other distros or less outdated kernels. Of course, the command should be easy enough to adapt to whatever service on your linux box you're trying to reach by changing the numbers (and possibly changing tcp to udp, or whatever). Between putty and psftp, however, I'm good to go for hours of time-killing.


    9
    iptables -t nat -A PREROUTING -p tcp --dport [port of your choosing] -j REDIRECT --to-ports 22
    brizznown · 2009-06-18 17:38:59 3
  • additionally use "find /etc/cron*" for cronscripts Show Sample Output


    1
    cut -d: -f1 /etc/passwd | grep -vE "#" | xargs -i{} crontab -u {} -l
    hoberion · 2009-06-18 16:49:52 2
  • Sometimes you're trying to read through an xml file to determine whats wrong with it and a tool had removed all the linebreaks. xmllint will go ahead and make it pretty for you.


    4
    xmllint --format <filename> > <output file>
    topperge · 2009-06-18 15:00:30 0

  • 0
    shred -vzu /tmp/junk-file-to-be-shredded
    mpb · 2009-06-18 12:00:19 2
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