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One command line web server on port 80 using nc (netcat)
Very simple web server listening on port 80 will serve index.html file or whatever file you like pointing your browser at http://your-IP-address/index.html for example. If your web server is down for maintenance and you'd like to inform your visitors about it, quickly and easily, you just have to put into the index.html file the right HTML code and you are done! Of course you need to be root to run the command using port 80.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Print a list of standard error codes and descriptions.
Written by jmcnamara Taken from http://www.perlmonks.org/?node_id=274896

Include a remote file (in vim)
Like vim scp://yourhost//your/file but in vim cmds.

check open ports without netstat or lsof

Join a folder full of split files
If you use newsgroups then you'll have come across split files before. Joining together a whole batch of them can be a pain so this will do the whole folder in one.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Programmatic way to find and set your timezone
1. it find your public ip via ifconfig.io 2. than use this IP to request your timezone via worldtimeapi.org 3. and send it to the command timedatectl set-timezone

Find all Mac Address
Is the better option on a Open SuSE Box

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }


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