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Find usb device in realtime
Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.

preserve disk; keep OS clean
if you use disk-based swap then it can defeat the purpose of this function.

Check hashes of files installed by Debian packages, reporting only errors.

Monitor RAID IO Usage
Shows the IO of the raid sync

Google text-to-speech in mp3 format
same but redirecting to player and putting whaever text line.. works on my ubuntu machine ...

Connect-back shell using Bash built-ins
Connect-back shell using Bash built-ins. Useful in a web app penetration test, if it's the case of a locked down environment, without the need for file uploads or a writable directory. -- /dev/tcp and /dev/udb redirects must be enabled at compile time in Bash. Most Linux distros enable this feature by default but at least Debian is known to disable it. -- http://labs.neohapsis.com/2008/04/17/connect-back-shell-literally/

Fast, built-in pipe-based data sink
This is shorter and actually much faster than >/dev/null (see sample output for timings) Plus, it looks like a disappointed face emoticon.

Use file(1) to view device information
file(1) can print details about certain devices in the /dev/ directory (block devices in this example). This helped me to know at a glance the location and revision of my bootloader, UUIDs, filesystem status, which partitions were primaries / logicals, etc.. without running several commands. See also: $ file -s /dev/dm-* $ file -s /dev/cciss/* etc..

Convert file type to unix utf-8
converts encoding of a file to unix utf-8 useful for data files that contain what would be usable ascii text but are encoded as mpeg or some other encoding that prevents you from doing common manipulations like 'sed'


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