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Remote copy directories and files through an SSH tunnel host
If you have lots of remote hosts sitting "behind" an ssh proxy host, then there is a special-case use of "rsynch" that allows one to easily copy directories and files across the ssh proxy host, without having to do two explicit copies: the '-e' option allows for a replacement "rsh" command. We use this option to specify an "ssh" tunnel command, with the '-A' option that causes authentication agent requests to be forwarded back to the local host. If you have ssh set up correctly, the above command can be done without any passwords being entered.

In (any) vi, add a keystroke to format the current paragraph.
That goes into your $HOME/.exrc file. " Nice macro to reformat lines: map ^A !}fmt Note that the ^A has to be input by typing ^V^A.

list files recursively by size

Do a command but skip recording it in the bash command history
Note the extra space before the command (I had to put it as an underscore since the website eats up preceding spaces). That's all it takes. Now if you check your history with "$ history", it wont show up.

Remove \r (carriage return) in a file

Sort files in folders alphabetically
Creates one letter folders in the current directory and moves files with corresponding initial in the folder.

Download an Entire website with wget

Inverted cowsay
It's quite fun to invert text using "flip.pl" (ref: http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2078323 ). Slightly more challenging is to flip a whole "cowsay". :-)

chmod - change file permissions of a file to be similar of another

Join lines
This command turns a multi-line file into a single line joined with <SOMETEXT>. To skip blank lines, use: $ perl -pe '(eof()||s/^\s*$//)||s/\n//g' file.txt


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