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Shows physically connected drives (SCSI or SATA)
This will show all physically connected SATA (and SCSI) drives on your system. This is particularly useful when troubleshooting hard disks.... or when a mount point seems to be missing.

Find the fastest server to disable comcast's DNS hijacking
Comcast is an ISP in the United States that has started hijacking DNS requests as a "service" for its customers. For example, in Firefox, one used to be able to do a quick "I'm Feeling Lucky" Google search by typing a single word into the URL field, assuming the word is not an existing domain when surrounded by www.*.com. Comcast customers never receive the correct NX (non-existent domain) error from DNS. Instead, they are shown a page full of advertising. There is a way to "opt out" from their service, but that requires having the account password and the MAC address of your modem handy. For me, it was easier just to set static DNS servers. But the problem is, which ones to choose? That's what this command answers. It'll show you the three _non-hijacked_ Comcast DNS servers that are the shortest distance away. Perhaps you don't have Comcast (lucky you!), but hopefully this command can serve as an example of using netselect to find the fastest server from a list. Note that, although this example doesn't show it, netselect will actually perform the uniq and DNS resolution for you. Requires: netselect, curl, sort, uniq, grep

convert wav into mp3 using lame

monitor a tail -f command with multiple processes
when using named pipes only one reader is given the output by default. Also, most commands piped to by grep use a buffer which save output until tail -f finishes, which is not convenient. Here, using a combination of tee, sub-processes and the --line-buffered switch in grep we can workaround the problem.

Bring the word under the cursor on the :ex line in Vim
Very handy to bring the word currently under the cursor into a :s command in Vim. Example: If the cursor was on the word "eggs": :s/ ==> :s/eggs

View all new log messages in real time with color

The Hidden PS
While going through the source code for the well known ps command, I read about some interesting things.. Namely, that there are a bunch of different fields that ps can try and enumerate for you. These are fields I was not able to find in the man pages, documentation, only in the source. Here is a longer function that goes through each of the formats recognized by the ps on your machine, executes it, and then prompts you whether you would like to add it or not. Adding it simply adds it to an array that is then printed when you ctrl-c or at the end of the function run. This lets you save your favorite ones and then see the command to put in your .bash_profile like mine at : http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html Note that I had to do the exec method below in order to pause with read. t () { local r l a P f=/tmp/ps c='command ps wwo pid:6,user:8,vsize:8,comm:20' IFS=' '; trap 'exec 66

Making scripts runs on backgourd and logging output
Save all output to a log.

Recursively execute command on directories (.svn, permissions, etc)
The above command will set the GID bit on all directories named .svn in the current directory recursively. This makes the group ownership of all .svn folders be the group ownership for all files created in that folder, no matter the user. This is useful for me as the subversion working directory on my server is also the live website and needs to be auto committed to subversion every so often via cron as well as worked on by multiple users. Setting the GID bit on the .svn folders makes sure we don't have a mix of .svn metadata created by a slew of different users.

View and review the system process tree.
The "pstree" command uses special line-drawing characters. However, when piped into the "less" pager, these are normally disabled.


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