All commands (14,045)


  • 5
    ss -plunt
    symgryph · 2019-12-09 17:44:55 6
  • This assumes you are in the cwd of where you put your s3 scripts. Its useful if someone decides to create aws cloudformation scripts and doesn't add the 'yaml' or .yml extension. Show Sample Output


    1
    rg -l "AWSTemplateFormatVersion: '2010-09-09'" *
    symgryph · 2019-12-09 17:43:10 6
  • Python is installed on many boxes (in case you could not afford installing jq).


    0
    curl -s "https://api.github.com/users/<username>/repos?per_page=1000" | python <(echo "import json,sys;v=json.load(sys.stdin);for i in v:; print(i['git_url']);" | tr ';' '\n')
    grault · 2019-12-07 10:49:58 5
  • in case you could afford installing jq


    1
    curl -s "https://api.github.com/users/<username>/repos?per_page=1000" | jq '.[].git_url'
    grault · 2019-12-07 10:48:32 5
  • Using the csv tool `miller` you can transform a csv file into a json array of objects, where the properties are the values of the csv header line and the values are the values of the subsequent lines. Show Sample Output


    2
    mlr --c2j --jlistwrap cat file.csv
    pepa65 · 2019-12-06 07:16:58 5

  • 5
    watch -n1 "ps aux --sort=-%mem,-%cpu | head -n 50"
    jgleeson · 2019-12-03 20:51:03 6
  • Use flag "--" to stop switch parsing Show Sample Output


    1
    grep -- -
    knoppix5 · 2019-11-29 23:45:06 5

  • 14
    curl -s https://api.github.com/users/<username>/repos?per_page=1000 |grep git_url |awk '{print $2}'| sed 's/"\(.*\)",/\1/'
    wuziduzi · 2019-11-19 20:31:19 5
  • Shell function which takes a bash command as its input, and displays the following formatted output: EXAMPLE: command OUTPUT: output from command Show Sample Output


    8
    example() { echo "EXAMPLE:"; echo; echo " $@"; echo; echo "OUTPUT:"; echo ; eval "$@" | sed 's/^/ /'; }
    bartonski · 2019-11-10 19:08:23 7
  • Measure the cpu performance: In-case if the cpu is thermal throttling then you can find it using this command. Check the first line of the output. Example: Doing md5 for 3s on 16 size blocks: 11406892 md5's in 2.98s ? #(When cpu is not throttling) Doing md5 for 3s on 16 size blocks: 110692 md5's in 2.98s ?? #(When cpu is thermal throttling) Practical use case: Once we had cooling outage in data center which caused thermal throttling in some of the worker nodes. We used this tool to prove that some servers are not performing well because of the cpu thermal throttling. Show Sample Output


    10
    openssl speed md5
    kharthigeyan · 2019-11-07 16:30:30 10
  • Click window to change its opacity. Source: https://unix.stackexchange.com/a/494289


    1
    xprop -format _NET_WM_WINDOW_OPACITY 32c -set _NET_WM_WINDOW_OPACITY 0x7FFFFFFF
    yoyoyojomo · 2019-10-31 20:44:21 5
  • This command first determines whether a second screen is connected. If this is the case, it sets the screen's RGB gamma via xrandr. Useful for cheap or slightly defective monitors with a tint. In this example a yellowing/champagne color deviation is compensated for by decreasing the red and the green portion of the image.


    1
    secondscreen=$(xrandr -q | grep " connected" | sed -n '2 p' | cut -f 1 -d ' '); [ "$secondscreen" ] && xrandr --output $secondscreen --gamma 0.6:0.75:1
    lordtoran · 2019-10-28 13:12:08 6
  • Change the file extension in batch. Useful to create output file names with same input name but distinct extension by including logic inside the loop


    3
    for file in *.txt; do mv "$file" "${file%.txt}.xml"; done
    neomefistox · 2019-10-24 04:35:10 4

  • 5
    find /glftpd/site/archive -type f|grep '([0-9]\{1,9\})\.[^.]\+$'|parallel -n1 -j200% md5sum ::: |awk 'x[$1]++ { print $2 " :::"}'|sed 's/^/Dupe: /g'|sed 's,Dupe,\x1B[31m&\x1B[0m,'
    wuziduzi · 2019-10-22 16:02:15 5
  • I find the other timers are inaccurate. It takes some microseconds to perform the date function. Therefore, using date/time math to calculate the time for us results in millisecond accuracy. This is tailored to the BusyBox date function. May need to change things around for GNU date function. Show Sample Output


    -1
    let T=$(date +%s)+3*60;while [ $(date +%s) -le $T ]; do let i=$T-$(date +%s); echo -ne "\r$(date -d"0:0:$i" +%H:%M:%S)"; sleep 0.3; done
    davidk · 2019-10-22 15:04:21 5
  • Top 10 Memory Processes (reduced output to applications and %usage only) Show Sample Output


    2
    ps aux | sort -rk 4,4 | head -n 10 | awk '{print $4,$11}'
    n0a110w · 2019-10-20 22:52:55 4
  • You will see it on the corner of your running terminal. Show Sample Output


    6
    while sleep 1; do tput sc; tput cup 0 $(($(tput cols)-29)); date; tput rc; done &
    rakibfiha · 2019-10-19 20:50:48 9
  • Hides all Files and Folders on the MacOS Desktop. To show files and folders, type "true" instead of "false". "Finder" at the end is case sensitive, "finder" doesn’t work


    2
    defaults write com.apple.finder CreateDesktop -bool false;killall Finder
    vranx · 2019-10-18 12:13:56 9

  • 2
    for i in *; do sum=$(md5sum $i); mv -- "$i" "${sum%% *}"; done
    malsploit · 2019-10-17 08:46:22 6
  • Works for repos cloned via ssh or https. Show Sample Output


    1
    git remote -v | sed -n '/github.com.*push/{s/^[^[:space:]]\+[[:space:]]\+//;s|git@github.com:|https://github.com/|;s/\.git.*//;p}'
    bartonski · 2019-10-11 16:50:22 3
  • GNU grep's perl-compatible regular expression(PCRE).


    1
    binaries () { dpkg -L "$1" | grep -Po '.*/bin/\K.*'; }
    metropolis · 2019-10-05 10:52:15 3
  • This shell function displays a list of binaries contained in an installed package; works on Debian based Linux distributions. Show Sample Output


    1
    binaries () { for f in $(dpkg -L "$1" | grep "/bin/"); do basename "$f"; done; }
    lordtoran · 2019-10-05 10:37:51 7
  • With this command you can convert a tab separate file (TSV) into a JSON file with jq. For example, this input.tsv i-0b9adca882e5e6326 172.16.0.188 i-088dd69e5c3624888 172.16.0.102 i-0e70eac180537d4aa 172.16.0.85 will produce the showed output. Show Sample Output


    2
    cat input.tsv | jq --raw-input --slurp 'split("\n") | map(split("\t")) | .[0:-1] | map( { "id": .[0], "ip": .[1] } )'
    nordri · 2019-10-01 10:52:35 3
  • It displays the top 10 processes sorted by memory usage Show Sample Output


    3
    ps aux | sort -rk 4,4 | head -n 10
    x3mboy · 2019-09-26 16:37:33 5
  • Copy this function to command line, press 'Enter' 'f'' 'Enter' to execute (sentence on the left written only for newbies). Hint 'e|x|v|1..9' in front of displayed last modified file name means: "Press 'e' for edit,'x' for execute,'v' for view or a digit-key '1..9' to touch one file from the recent files list to be last modified" and suggested (hidden files are listed too, else remove 'a' from 'ls -tarp' statement if not intended). If you find this function useful you can then rename it if needed and append or include into your ~/.bashrc config script. With the command . ~/.bashrc the function then can be made immediately available. In the body of the function modifications can be made, i.e. replaced joe editor command or added new option into case statement, for example 'o) exo-open $h;;' command for opening file with default application - or something else (here could not be added since the function would exceed 255 chars). To cancel execution of function started is no need to press Ctrl-C - if the mind changed and want to leave simple Enter-press is enough. Once defined, this function can with typeset -f f command be displayed in easy readable form Show Sample Output


    2
    f() { ls -lart;e="ls -tarp|grep -v /|tail -9";j=${e/9/1};g=${e/9/9|nl -nln};h=$(eval $j);eval $g;read -p "e|x|v|1..9 $(eval $j)?" -n 1 -r;case $REPLY in e) joe $h;;v)cat $h;;x) eval $h;;[1-9]) s=$(eval $g|egrep ^$REPLY) && touch "${s:7}" && f;;esac ; }
    knoppix5 · 2019-09-26 11:58:37 3
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List the popular module namespaces on CPAN
Grabs the complete module list from CPAN, pulls the first column, ditches html lines, counts, ditches small namespaces.

Create an animated gif from a Youtube video
requires "youtube-dl" -- sure you can do this with wget and some more obscurity but why waste your time when this great tool is available? the guts consist of mplayer converting a video to a gif -- study this command and read the man page for more information $ mplayer video.flv -ss 00:23 -endpos 6 -vo gif89a:fps=5:output=output.gif -vf scale=400:300 -nosound generates a 6 second gif starting at 23 seconds of play time at 5 fps and a scale of 400x300 start time (-ss)/end time (-endpos) formats: 00:00:00.000 end time should be relative to start time, not absolute. i.e. -endpos 5 == seconds after 0:42 = 0:47 end point play with fps and scale for lower gif sizes the subshell is a solution for the -b flag on youtube-dl which downloads the best quality video, sometimes, which can be various video formats $(ls ${url##*=}*| tail -n1)

The top ten commands you use

Get list of servers with a specific port open
Change the -p argument for the port number. See "man nmap" for different ways to specify address ranges.

reverse order of file
awk reverse order of lines (emulates "tac")

generate random password (works on Mac OS X)
Prepending env LC_CTYPE=C fixes a problem with bad bytes in /dev/urandom on Mac OS X

Nicely display permissions in octal format with filename
Nicely display permissions in octal format and filename for a given directory

Mouse Tracking
Will track your mouse and save it to a file. You can use gnuplot to graph it: $ gnuplot -persist

Converts uppercase chars in a string to lowercase

Make vim open in tabs by default (save to .profile)
I always add this to my .profile rc so I can do things like: "vim *.c" and the files are opened in tabs.


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