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Rebuild a Delimited File with a Unique Delimiter
Useful for CSV files. In the command, the file in question is comma delimited but contains double quoted fields containing commas and contains no @ symbols (as confirmed with http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/9998/delimiter-hunting). This command converts the delimiting commas to @s while preserving the commas in the fields using the "uniqueString" to mark the ends of lines.

Rename many files in directories and subdirectories
This is probably overkill, but I have some issues when the directories have spaces in their names. The $ find . -type d -print0 | while read -d $'\0' dir; do xxx; done loops over all the subdirectories in this place, ignoring the white spaces (to some extend). $ cd "$dir"; echo " process $dir"; cd -; goes to the directory and back. It also prints some info to check the progress. $ find . -maxdepth 1 -name "*.ogg.mp3" -exec rename 's/.ogg.mp3/.mp3/' {} \; renames the file within the current directory. The whole should work with directories and file names that include white spaces.

tar directory and compress it with showing progress and Disk IO limits
tar directory and compress it with showing progress and Disk IO limits. Pipe Viewer can be used to view the progress of the task, Besides, he can limit the disk IO, especially useful for running Servers.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

most used unix commands

Recursive find and replace file extension / suffix (mass rename files)
Find recursively all files in ~/Notes with the extension '.md' and pipe that via xargs to rename command, which will replace every '.md' to '.txt' in this example (existing files will not be overwritten).

Install pip with Proxy
Installs pip packages defining a proxy

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Search commandlinefu and view syntax-highlighted results in vim
Here is the full function (got trunctated), which is much better and works for multiple queries. function cmdfu () { local t=~/cmdfu; until [[ -z $1 ]]; do echo -e "\n# $1 {{{1" >> $t; curl -s "commandlinefu.com/commands/matching/$1/`echo -n $1|base64`/plaintext" | sed '1,2d;s/^#.*/& {{{2/g' | tee -a $t > $t.c; sed -i "s/^# $1 {/# $1 - `grep -c '^#' $t.c` {/" $t; shift; done; vim -u /dev/null -c "set ft=sh fdm=marker fdl=1 noswf" -M $t; rm $t $t.c } Searches commandlinefu for single/multiple queries and displays syntax-highlighted, folded, and numbered results in vim.

Remove multiple same rpm packages
If somehow if you get more than 1 same name rpm package install, then it cannot be removed by using simple rpm -e as it gives you more than one rpm matches error. The --matches will help to remove all the same name rpm packages.


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