All commands (13,793)

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands


Check These Out

Takes all file except file between !()
Go to tmp : cd /tmp; mkdir retmp; cd retmp Create 10 files : for i in {1..10}; do touch test$i; done Remove all files except test10 : rm !(test10)

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Copy files based on extension with recursive and keeping directory structure
Copy file theo phần mở rộng c? đệ quy v? giữ nguy?n cấu tr?c thư mục Replace "jar" by extension which you need.

Convert CSV to JSON
Replace 'csv_file.csv' with your filename.

Convert camelCase to underscores (camel_case)
Useful for switching over someone else's coding style who uses camelCase notation to your style using all lowercase with underscores.

Displays the version of the Adobe Flash plugin installed
This is for Debian, simply change the path if your Flash plugin is installed elsewhere.

Grep recursively for a pattern and open all files that match, in order, in Vim, landing on 1st match

STAT Function showing ALL info, stat options, and descriptions
This shows every bit of information that stat can get for any file, dir, fifo, etc. It's great because it also shows the format and explains it for each format option. If you just want stat help, create this handy alias 'stath' to display all format options with explanations. $ alias stath="stat --h|sed '/Th/,/NO/!d;/%/!d'" To display on 2 lines: $ ( F=/etc/screenrc N=c IFS=$'\n'; for L in $(sed 's/%Z./%Z\n/'

Get all possible problems from any log files
Using the grep command, retrieve all lines from any log files in /var/log/ that have one of the problem states

Insert a comment on command line for reminder
Comments can be used directly on the command line so I can save in the history a brief description of what command does.


Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: