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gpg decrypt a file
gpg command to decrypt a previously encrypted file on the command line. Can be optionally made into an alias: alias decrypt='gpg --output foo.txt --decrypt foo.txt.pgp'

Schedule a script or command in x num hours, silently run in the background even if logged out
doesn't require "at", change the "2h" to whatever you want... (deafult unit for sleep is seconds)

Delete all files by extension
This is a correction to https://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/22134 Use `-name` instead of `-iname`, because case-sensitivity is probably important when we're dealing with filenames. It's true that extensions are often capitalised (e.g., "something.JPG"), so choose whatever's appropriate. However, what is appropriate is the quoting of the name pattern, so the shell doesn't expand it incorrectly. Finally, `-delete` is clearer.

update you web
in fact, I want to know, how to only get the modified files.

Pipe a textfile to vim and move the cursor to a certain line
This command is more for demonstrating piping to vim and jumping to a specific line than anything else. Exit vim with :q! +23 jumps to line 23 - make vim receive the data from the pipe

show ALL iptable rules
show your current iptable rules from every available iptable table

Search command history on bash
Very handy and time-saving. Do a 'ctrl+ r' on command prompt. You will see a "(reverse-i-search)`':" mark. Just type any sub-string of the command you want to search(provided you have used it sometime in the same session). Keep on searching by repeatedly pressing ctrl+r. Press enter once you get the desired command string.

Convert CSV to JSON
Replace 'csv_file.csv' with your filename.

Check Ram Speed and Type in Linux
from http://maysayadkaba.blogspot.com/2008/08/linux-check-ram-speed-and-type.html

validate the syntax of a perl-compatible regular expression
Place the regular expression you want to validate between the forward slashes in the eval block.


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