Commands by 1nF1D3L (1)

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Adding formatting to an xml document for easier reading
This will indent the input to be more readable. Warnings and messages are not send to STDOUT so you can just use a pipe to create the formatted outputfile, like: $ tidy -i -xml in.xml > out.xml

geoip information
A function that takes a domain name as an argument

How many Linux and Windows devices are on your network?
Shows how many Windows and Linux devices are on your network. May add support for others, but that's all that are on my network right now.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

ping MAC ADDRESS
# first install arp-scan if not have it arp-scan 10.1.1.0/24 .... show ip+mac in localnet awk '/00:1b:11:dc:a9:65/ {print $1}' .... get ip associated with MAC ` backtick make do command substitution passing ip to command ping

sqlite3 cmd to extract Firefox bookmarks from places.sqlite
Found this useful query at http://id.motd.org/pivot/entry.php?id=22. The b.parent=2 in the command refers to the bookmarks folder to extract. See the source webpage for additional info.

Send remote command output to your local clipboard
This command will copy command's output into your local clipboard

Watching Command
If you need to keep an eye on a command whose output is changing, use the watch command. For example, to keep an eye on your load average

Switch 2 characters on a command line.
If you typed 'sl', put the cursor on the 'l' and hit ctrl-t to get 'ls'.

Place the argument of the most recent command on the shell
When typing out long arguments, such as: $ cp file.txt /var/www/wp-content/uploads/2009/03/ You can put that argument on your command line by holding down the ALT key and pressing the period '.' or by pressing <ESC> then the period '.'. For example: $ cd 'ALT+.' would put '/var/www/wp-content/uploads/2009/03/ as my argument. Keeping pressing 'ALT+.' to cycle through arguments of your commands starting from most recent to oldest. This can save a ton of typing.


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