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Check reverse DNS

Binary clock
Like 7171, but fixed typo, uses fewer variables, and even more cryptic!

Open the current project on Github by typing gh
Written for Mac OSX. When you are working in a project and want to open it on Github.com, just type "gh" and your default browser will open with the repo you are in. Works for submodules, and repo's that you don't own. You'll need to copy / paste this command into a gh.sh file, then create an alias in your bash or zsh profile to the gh.sh script. Detailed instructions here if you still need help: http://gist.github.com/1917716

Generate a Change Log with git
Generate a changelog between the v1 and v2 tags

Grep all non-ascii character in file
It will highlight non-ascii character in a file. those character can cause problem for some application parsing ascii file.

prevent large files from being cached in memory (backups!)
We all know... $ nice -n19 for low CPU priority.   $ ionice -c3 for low I/O priority.   nocache can be useful in related scenarios, when we operate on very large files just a single time, e.g. a backup job. It advises the kernel that no caching is required for the involved files, so our current file cache is not erased, potentially decreasing performance on other, more typical file I/O, e.g. on a desktop.   http://askubuntu.com/questions/122857 https://github.com/Feh/nocache http://packages.debian.org/search?keywords=nocache http://packages.ubuntu.com/search?keywords=nocache   To undo caching of a single file in hindsight, you can do $ cachedel   To check the cache status of a file, do $ cachestats

Count all files in directories recursively with find
Counts the files present in the different directories recursively. One only has to change maxdepth to have further insight in the directory hierarchy. Found at unix.stackexchange.com: http://unix.stackexchange.com/questions/4105/how-do-i-count-all-the-files-recursively-through-directories

Start a terminal with three open tabs
If you launch gnome-terminal manually, you can start with three open tabs

Create user add lines from partial passwd file
Handy if you are installing a new server or recovering an old one and you have a passwd file with the accounts you want to add to the server. If you edit the file so that only the accounts that you want to add are left this line will spit out the correct useradd lines. The uid, gecos and shell will be preserved.

how many pages will my text files print on?
This gives a very rough estimate of how many pages your text files will print on. Assumes 60 lines per page, and does not take long lines into account.


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